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Viejas Band

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BUSINESS
August 11, 1995 | From Associated Press
Using money from its casino, a San Diego County Native American tribe agreed Thursday to buy controlling interest in a troubled bank for $2.4 million. If the deal is approved by state and federal regulators, the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians would own 60% of Borrego Springs Bank, said bank President Frank Riolo. It would be the first takeover of a bank by an Indian tribe in California, regulators said.
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NEWS
August 13, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two weeks after Gov. Pete Wilson rejected their gaming proposal, members of the Viejas Indian tribe approved a deal modeled after a compact struck between Wilson and the Pala tribe, also of San Diego County. The Viejas tribe, seeking to protect its lucrative video gaming machines, approved the compact by an overwhelming margin. An accord with the state is necessary to keep the federal government from confiscating video slot machines, which Wilson says are illegal.
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NEWS
August 13, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two weeks after Gov. Pete Wilson rejected their gaming proposal, members of the Viejas Indian tribe approved a deal modeled after a compact struck between Wilson and the Pala tribe, also of San Diego County. The Viejas tribe, seeking to protect its lucrative video gaming machines, approved the compact by an overwhelming margin. An accord with the state is necessary to keep the federal government from confiscating video slot machines, which Wilson says are illegal.
BUSINESS
August 11, 1995 | From Associated Press
Using money from its casino, a San Diego County Native American tribe agreed Thursday to buy controlling interest in a troubled bank for $2.4 million. If the deal is approved by state and federal regulators, the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians would own 60% of Borrego Springs Bank, said bank President Frank Riolo. It would be the first takeover of a bank by an Indian tribe in California, regulators said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1992 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first venture of its kind in the nation, the Viejas band of Mission Indians has approved the development of a $250-million amusement and water park on its East San Diego County reservation. The Indians hope the 120-acre project will piggyback on San Diego County's tourism industry and their own gambling casino and create 2,400 jobs during peak summers after its completion in 1996. The project was approved by 58% of tribal members in a vote taken Wednesday, said Anthony R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2003 | From Times Wire Reports
A judge has dismissed a lawsuit by the Viejas Indian band to prevent another tribe from building a casino on nearby land. In August, the Viejas sued the Southern Indian Health Council and six members of its board of directors. The suit alleged the board violated state laws on nonprofit corporations when it approved plans by the Ewiiaapaayp Indian band to build a casino and a new clinic on a 10-acre parcel in Alpine.
NEWS
October 9, 1992 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first venture of its kind in the nation, the Viejas band of Mission Indians has approved the development of a $250-million amusement and water park on its East San Diego County reservation. The Indians hope the 120-acre project will piggyback on San Diego County's tourism industry and their own gambling casino and create 2,400 jobs during peak summers after its completion in 1996. The project was approved by 58% of tribal members in a vote taken Wednesday, said Anthony R.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
The Manzanita Indian band and the Viejas band are developing an agreement that would establish an off-reservation casino in the border town of Calexico. Under the tentative agreement, Viejas would provide funds to help the Manzanita band purchase land in Calexico, build the facility and cover start-up operational costs. Manzanita would operate the casino, with 20 to 30 card tables and up to 2,000 slot machines. A golf course, hotel and RV park could follow, said Manzanita spokesman John
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 2003 | Jeffrey L. Rabin
Lt. Gov. Cruz Bustamante's 2002 reelection committee reported Wednesday the transfer of $250,000 from that fund to the lieutenant governor's anti-recall campaign committee, Californians for Stability. And the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians reported Wednesday an independent expenditure of $66,205 to create, construct and distribute yard signs supporting Bustamante's candidacy for governor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
A Viejas Indian tribe official, along with two alleged accomplices, was jailed without bail Sunday in the stabbing death of a man and the stabbing and wounding of another man after a concert by rap artist Nelly, police said. Viejas Tribal Chairman Steven TeSam, 42, and his 26-year-old nephew, Hank Banegas, both of Alpine, were jailed without bail for investigation of murder and attempted murder after the stabbings late Friday outside the Coors Amphitheater in Chula Vista.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 9, 1992 | JONATHAN GAW, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the first venture of its kind in the nation, the Viejas band of Mission Indians has approved the development of a $250-million amusement and water park on its East San Diego County reservation. The Indians hope the 120-acre project will piggyback on San Diego County's tourism industry and their own gambling casino and create 2,400 jobs during peak summers after its completion in 1996. The project was approved by 58% of tribal members in a vote taken Wednesday, said Anthony R.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2004 | E. Scott Reckard, Times Staff Writer
Directors of the Borrego Springs Bank, which specializes in financial services for Native Americans, have given the go-ahead for the bank's majority shareholder -- the Viejas Band of Kumeyaay Indians -- to buy out minority investors. The proposed deal would pay $23.7 million in cash to minority shareholders in the three-branch San Diego County bank, which had struggled for many years.
NEWS
March 30, 2000 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
An Indian tribe's plan to operate a gambling cruise ship between San Diego and Rosarito Beach was delayed Wednesday when the state Senate took the bill back from Gov. Gray Davis' desk rather than risk a veto. The legislation by Senate President Pro Tem John Burton was aimed at accommodating the Viejas band of Indians in San Diego County and its partner in the venture by making a seemingly minor change in the law that would have permitted their cruise ship to sail legally in California waters.
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