Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsViejas Indian Reservation
IN THE NEWS

Viejas Indian Reservation

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
August 1, 1992 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans to construct a $225-million, 180-acre amusement park, water slide park and resort complex at the Viejas Indian Reservation east of El Cajon were rejected by five votes, tribal leaders said Friday. The private company pitching the project had said it would employ 200 people full time--thousands during the summer--and generate millions of dollars for the Viejas band of Mission Indians.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 13, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two weeks after Gov. Pete Wilson rejected their gaming proposal, members of the Viejas Indian tribe approved a deal modeled after a compact struck between Wilson and the Pala tribe, also of San Diego County. The Viejas tribe, seeking to protect its lucrative video gaming machines, approved the compact by an overwhelming margin. An accord with the state is necessary to keep the federal government from confiscating video slot machines, which Wilson says are illegal.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1986
An El Cajon man was ordered Thursday to stand trial for murder in the death of a woman whose bound body was dumped on the Viejas Indian Reservation in Alpine in April. Jeffrey Antone Langnese, 37, was bound over to Superior Court in the April 10 slaying of 27-year-old Lisa Arnold of El Cajon.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1992 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans to construct a $225-million, 180-acre amusement theme park, water slide park and hotel resort complex on the Viejas Indian Reservation east of El Cajon were rejected by a margin of just five votes, tribal leaders said Friday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 1, 1992 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans to construct a $225-million, 180-acre amusement theme park, water slide park and hotel resort complex on the Viejas Indian Reservation east of El Cajon were rejected by a margin of just five votes, tribal leaders said Friday.
NEWS
May 8, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Like other American Indian communities nationwide, the impoverished Viejas band of Mission Indians has considerable land but is in dire need of jobs and development. At the same time, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service has lots of jobs and a large budget but needs more jail space to house some of the hundreds of thousands of illegal aliens it arrests every year in Southern California. A singular convergence of these two contrasting needs is unfolding in a scenic backcountry valley, home of the Viejas Indian Reservation in San Diego County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Like other native American communities nationwide, the impoverished Viejas band of Mission Indians has considerable land but is in dire need of jobs and development. The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service is a giant government bureaucracy that has lots of jobs and a large budget, but the agency urgently needs more jail space to house some of the hundreds of thousands of illegal aliens it arrests every year in Southern California. A singular convergence of these two broadly contrasting needs is unfolding in a scenic backcountry valley, home of the Viejas Indian Reservation and 30 miles inland from San Diego.
NEWS
August 13, 1998 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two weeks after Gov. Pete Wilson rejected their gaming proposal, members of the Viejas Indian tribe approved a deal modeled after a compact struck between Wilson and the Pala tribe, also of San Diego County. The Viejas tribe, seeking to protect its lucrative video gaming machines, approved the compact by an overwhelming margin. An accord with the state is necessary to keep the federal government from confiscating video slot machines, which Wilson says are illegal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1990
A San Diego County sheriff's deputy shot a man Monday evening on the Viejas Indian Reservation, deputies said. The officer had been called about 6:30 p.m. to a family disturbance on Viejas Grade Road on the reservation, about three miles east of Alpine and 30 miles east of downtown San Diego, deputies said. The wounded man, who was unidentified, was taken to Sharp Memorial Hospital with an abdominal wound, nursing supervisor Melanie Bruce said.
NEWS
August 1, 1992 | TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Plans to construct a $225-million, 180-acre amusement park, water slide park and resort complex at the Viejas Indian Reservation east of El Cajon were rejected by five votes, tribal leaders said Friday. The private company pitching the project had said it would employ 200 people full time--thousands during the summer--and generate millions of dollars for the Viejas band of Mission Indians.
NEWS
May 8, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Like other American Indian communities nationwide, the impoverished Viejas band of Mission Indians has considerable land but is in dire need of jobs and development. At the same time, the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service has lots of jobs and a large budget but needs more jail space to house some of the hundreds of thousands of illegal aliens it arrests every year in Southern California. A singular convergence of these two contrasting needs is unfolding in a scenic backcountry valley, home of the Viejas Indian Reservation in San Diego County.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1989 | PATRICK McDONNELL, Times Staff Writer
Like other native American communities nationwide, the impoverished Viejas band of Mission Indians has considerable land but is in dire need of jobs and development. The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service is a giant government bureaucracy that has lots of jobs and a large budget, but the agency urgently needs more jail space to house some of the hundreds of thousands of illegal aliens it arrests every year in Southern California. A singular convergence of these two broadly contrasting needs is unfolding in a scenic backcountry valley, home of the Viejas Indian Reservation and 30 miles inland from San Diego.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1986
A Harbison Canyon man who beat a woman to death and left her body on the Viejas Indian Reservation was sentenced Monday to 15-years-to-life in state prison. The parents of Lisa Arnold watched as San Diego Superior Court Judge Richard Huffman sentenced their daughter's killer, Jeffrey Antone Langnese, 37, to prison. Huffman, who noted that Langnese's occupation involved selling illegal drugs, denied a defense request to order a diagnostic study. He also fined him $1,000.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|