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NEWS
December 20, 2011
Christmas markets, like this one in Vienna, date to the Middle Ages but are a hit with modern-day visitors.  John Plummer of Pasadena snapped this late-in-the-day photo in December 2010. He was on a Viking River cruise from Budapest, Hungary, to Nuremberg, Germany. The markets are a tradition in the German-speaking world, but the practice has spread to Britain, Romania and the U.S. Shoppers can find handcrafted gifts, of course, but the fairs are also a good place to find favorite holiday foods.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By Christopher Hawthorne, Los Angeles Times Architecture Critic
Hans Hollein, the Austrian architect who died Thursday at 80, was one of a small number of architects who set a loose framework for what would become postmodern architecture, with its focus on humor, irony, eclecticism and freewheeling historical quotation. In 1976 Hollein designed a local project that would dramatically raise his profile: a whimsical branch of the Austrian Travel Bureau, which the architect filled with brass palm trees and the faux ruins of Greek columns. The project helped Hollein gain both bigger projects and international notice.
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NEWS
December 31, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Arab terrorists who attacked passengers last week at the Vienna airport's El Al airline counter intended to take Israeli hostages and hijack an El Al jetliner, a senior Austrian official said Monday. Interior Minister Karl Blecha also said called it "very likely" that the terrorists belonged to a group headed by Abu Nidal, a Palestinian extremist who split with Palestine Liberation Organization leader Yasser Arafat in the 1970s while accusing Arafat of being too moderate.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 24, 2014 | By Christopher Hawthorne
In the 1970s, architecture faced an identity crisis. A lacerating critique of modern architecture's overreach, especially in remaking wide swaths of cities, had left the profession's 20th-century heroes - Le Corbusier, Mies Van der Rohe, even Frank Lloyd Wright - without many prominent defenders. But what would take modernism's place? What could architecture do with the rubble of that once dominant movement? Hans Hollein, the Austrian architect who died Thursday in Vienna at 80, according to a family spokeswoman cited by the Associated Press, was among those who provided convincing early answers to those questions.
TRAVEL
April 29, 2012 | By Alice Short, Los Angeles Times
VIENNA - The Hotel Sacher will never be mistaken for a hip hotel. The elaborate gilt trim in public rooms, the old-school celebrity photos that adorn the walls and the tourists in line to sample Sacher torte - all evidence that guests are unlikely to think of Philippe Starck or Shawn Hausman as they explore the place. What's more, everything about the hotel is expensive - overpriced some might say. It's easy to imagine the Sacher's halcyon days are over. And yet. The fin de siècle charm of the place is undeniable.
NEWS
October 29, 1986 | From a Times Staff Writer
Secretary of State George P. Shultz apparently has decided to snub Austrian President Kurt Waldheim during a scheduled visit to Vienna next week to attend a European security conference. State Department spokesman Charles Redman said Shultz has no plans to make a courtesy visit to Waldheim, who was elected chief of state earlier this year despite charges that he was involved in Nazi war crimes while serving as a junior officer in the German army in World War II.
NEWS
December 29, 1985 | Associated Press
Following is a preliminary list of Americans killed or wounded in the the terrorist attacks Friday on airports at Rome and Vienna. The list was compiled by the Associated Press based on reports from local police and government offices, U.S. diplomatic missions and the State Department. Killed in Rome: John Buonocore, 20, Wilmington, Del.; Frederick Gage Jr., 29, Madison, Wis.; Don Maland, 30, New Port Richey, Fla.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 2012 | By Christopher Knight, Los Angeles Times Art Critic
The J. Paul Getty Museumis having a Vienna moment, with two historical exhibitions of work by two artists whose profiles have gone from relatively obscure to popular favorite only in recent decades. Partly that's because of their eccentricity: It hasn't always been easy to know quite how they fit into established art historical narratives. Franz Xaver Messerschmidt (1736-83) was an accomplished German Baroque sculptor who, when he moved from Bavaria to Austria, set aside expressive drama for the newly fashionable revival of sober classicism sweeping Europe.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1988 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
"Welcome in Vienna" (Fine Arts), the concluding portion of Axel Corti's superb, six-hour "Where To and Back" trilogy, is a bittersweet valentine to Austria, at once an expression of love of one's homeland--and hate for its pervasive and enduring anti-Semitism. It is set in Vienna just as World War II ends, but its implications for Kurt Waldheim's Austria are clear and devastating. "Welcome in Vienna," however, resists the judgmental and is above all a quest for identity.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 11, 2009 | Associated Press
It's a concert venue fit for a king -- even the self-proclaimed King of Pop. Vienna's majestic Schoenbrunn Palace, once home to Emperor Franz Joseph and his wasp-waisted consort, Empress Sisi, will serve as the backdrop for what organizers billed Monday as a "global" farewell tribute to Michael Jackson next month. World Awards Media GmbH, the promoter, said members of Jackson's family and a "high-profile lineup of international stars" would perform on a multimedia stage built in the shape of a giant crown on the palace's sculpted grounds.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
BERKELEY - The Vienna Philharmonic is an orchestra that has always been gripped by as well as in the grip of history - the history of Western music, of which it has played a significant part, and the history of Vienna, of which it has also played a significant part. Now "Confronting the Past," has become an official project of the orchestra. In mannerly Viennese fashion, what the orchestra really means is confronting its past. That is what it did in a special residency as part of the UC Berkeley Cal Performances' series that included three concerts in Zellerbach Hall along with a two-day symposium examining the orchestra's history from the outbreak of World War I to the present.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2014 | Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Italian conductor Daniele Gatti, about whom there has been much interest of late, may have been forced to cancel his appearance with the Vienna Philharmonic at Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall on Monday night due to an inflamed tendon, but he was replaced by an even bigger name, Lorin Maazel. The program of Schubert and Mahler symphonies remained the same. But nothing remained remotely the same. Maazel is a uniquely idiosyncratic interpreter and a uniquely practiced veteran musical manipulator.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2014 | By Christie D'Zurilla
A half-million bucks for a date night at a fancy party doesn't sound like hard work - but Kim Kardashian's deal to accompany billionaire Richard Lugner to the Vienna Opera Ball in Austria doesn't seem to have played out very well. Lugner, who over the years has made a habit of hiring various starlet-types to be his big-bucks arm candy for the annual event, told local reporters before the ball that the reality-TV diva was "annoying," according to Radar Online . Mom Kris Jenner and baby North both accompanied Kim to Vienna, where Lugner met them at their private jet upon arrival, complete with flowers.
WORLD
February 17, 2014 | By Paul Richter
JAKARTA, Indonesia - U.S. diplomats preparing for a new round of nuclear negotiations with Iran this week are pondering an important question: How can they make the Iranians feel like the winners? The U.S. team and diplomats from five other nations sit down with Iran on Tuesday in Vienna to begin bargaining on what could be a historic agreement to prevent the Islamic Republic from gaining a bomb-making capability. An atmosphere of high anticipation surrounds the talks, which are expected to continue for six months to a year, and possibly longer.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By David Ng
As the Vienna Philharmonic prepares for its annual New Year's Day concert that will be seen by television viewers around the world, the renowned orchestra has decided to withdraw honors that it bestowed upon several members of the Nazi Party during World War II. The orchestra had honored at least six high-ranking members of the Nazi Party with its so-called "rings of honor" and other awards. Orchestra leaders decided to posthumously revoke those awards in October, but the news was first reported Friday by Reuters . Among those party members whose awards were revoked are Baldur von Schirach, the Vienna governor from 1940 to 1945; Arthur Seyss-Inquart, an Adolf Hitler cabinet minister; and SS leader Albert Reitter.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2013 | By Heller McAlpin
"The Apartment," Greg Baxter's absorbing, atmospheric and enigmatic first novel, unfolds in extended paragraphs without chapter breaks on a single snowy mid-December day in a fictional European city that evokes aspects of Vienna, Prague and Budapest. Its long, frigid journey into a long, sleepless night explores a man's uneasy relationship with his past, himself and a world in which violence is inescapable. The book's unnamed 41-year-old narrator is a retired U.S. Navy submariner who has served two tours providing intelligence in Iraq - the first as a reservist, the second as a private contractor identifying insurgents for the Iraqi police, which made him a fortune.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 1987 | KATHRYN BAKER, Associated Press Television Writer
Walter Cronkite may be a major television figure in this country, but he found he didn't impress his European friends until he hosted the Vienna Philharmonic's New Year's Day broadcast. The concert, to be carried on U.S. public television stations today, could be the most-watched television broadcast in the world next to the Olympics, Cronkite said in an interview at his office at CBS. "It's possible because it's so widely broadcast," Cronkite said.
TRAVEL
November 18, 2012
CZECH REPUBLIC, HUNGARY AND AUSTRIA Slide show Roberta Kritzia will speak about her travels to Prague, Budapest and Vienna. When, where: 7:30 p.m. Monday at Distant Lands, 20 S. Raymond Ave., Pasadena. Admission, info: Free. RSVP to (626) 449-3220. SNOWSHOEING Workshop Experts will offer tips on snowshoeing basics, gear and where to go to get started. When, where: 6:30 p.m. Wednesday at the REI store in Tustin, 2962 El Camino Real. Admission, info : Free.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 2013 | By Gary Goldstein
In "Bridging the Gap," director Curt Faudon lands all over the map - literally and figuratively - as he attempts to show how the angelic vocals of the venerable Vienna Boys' Choir can unite people of the most disparate countries, cultures and religions because, y'know, there's power in music. But Faudon, who also wrote this oddball documentary's hoity-toity script with Tina Breckwoldt, can't keep still long enough to craft a sufficiently coherent and cohesive portrait. This leaves the viewer adrift in a barrage of postcard-pretty visuals and lovely but, some may find, indistinguishable classical songs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2013 | Bob Pool
The tiny star-shaped gem that Vienna violin student Karina Ille discovered last month during a visit to California had turned her into a media star by the time she returned to her home in Austria. The 21-year-old tourist and her boyfriend, Henry Carradine, discovered the unusual stone -- a deep-blue piece of benitoite -- Aug. 11 at an open-pit mine near the Central Valley town of Coalinga. Visitors there pay $70 to spend the day digging through the rubble and can take home any benitoite they find.
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