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December 1, 1997 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Few musical ensembles come with a greater load of tradition than the Vienna Choir Boys, which traces its roots back nearly 500 years. The famed choir has visited North America almost annually since 1932, and the touring contingent heard Saturday at the Carpenter Performing Arts Center of Cal State Long Beach carried all that history honorably. The utterly characteristic program began with choruses and part-songs by Mendelssohn, Brahms and the most famous of all the choir's alums, Schubert.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1999 | JOHN HENKEN
Other ensembles come and go, but the Vienna Choir Boys seem to be forever. Now launched on its second half-millennium, the famed choir has visited the U.S. almost annually since 1932, and the 23-boy contingent heard Friday at Marsee Auditorium of the El Camino College Center for the Arts upheld its venerable traditions with joy and diligence. Organizationally, the path to the future has been an uneven one.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1987 | JOHN HENKEN
The Vienna Choir Boys are a tradition, albeit a flexible one--after all, the institution can trace its origin to 1498. To someone who had not seen the group recently, signs of change were apparent Wednesday evening when the venerable choir sang at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. The superficies of the performance were as remembered: The boys wore their middy blouses and offered a mixed bag of classical and pops numbers, gloriously sung.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1997 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Few musical ensembles come with a greater load of tradition than the Vienna Choir Boys, which traces its roots back nearly 500 years. The famed choir has visited North America almost annually since 1932, and the touring contingent heard Saturday at the Carpenter Performing Arts Center of Cal State Long Beach carried all that history honorably. The utterly characteristic program began with choruses and part-songs by Mendelssohn, Brahms and the most famous of all the choir's alums, Schubert.
TRAVEL
November 8, 1987 | NINO LO BELLO, Lo Bello is an American author and newspaperman living in Vienna.
"Hot ticket" is the name of the game for what is dubbed the Sunday morning "Mass of the Vienna Choir Boys." It has been that way at the Hofburg Chapel for as long as anybody can remember. Is there a church anywhere, besides St. Peter's in Rome, that on any given Sunday or Catholic holiday will attract throngs of shoulder-to-shoulder tourists to its highest solemn service?
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 1999 | JOHN HENKEN
Other ensembles come and go, but the Vienna Choir Boys seem to be forever. Now launched on its second half-millennium, the famed choir has visited the U.S. almost annually since 1932, and the 23-boy contingent heard Friday at Marsee Auditorium of the El Camino College Center for the Arts upheld its venerable traditions with joy and diligence. Organizationally, the path to the future has been an uneven one.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1994 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the best things about the Vienna Choir Boys is thatthey they never pretend to be anything but children. They may be vocally blessed, trained and disciplined, but there is no Hollywood hype, no hint at worldliness beyond their 10 to 14 years, no saccharin stabs at calculated cuteness. There is only purity of vocal production and of youth. These qualities distinguished their performance Saturday night at Segerstrom Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1994 | By BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Six years after Columbus landed in America, some five centuries ago, by the Emperor's decree, the choristers of the Imperial Chapel in Vienna began singing. One of the group's more recent members, having served a five-year stint in the early 19th Century, was Franz Schubert. Early this century, the collapse of the Hapsburg dynasty resulted in a brief hiatus for the choristers.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1987 | CHRIS PASLES, Times Staff Writer
Every member of the legendary Vienna Choir Boys can tell you how far a roll of toilet paper unrolls. "At all the high-rise hotels they stay at, the boys always want to find how long a roll of toilet paper is," said Wally Adams, company manager for the choir's North American tours for the last 15 years. "Seventeen floors--that's the average, at least for hotel toilet rolls. I don't know about the home variety," he said with a laugh.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 1, 1997 | JOHN HENKEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Few musical ensembles come with a greater load of tradition than the Vienna Choir Boys, which traces its roots back nearly 500 years. The famed choir has visited North America almost annually since 1932, and the touring contingent heard Saturday at the Carpenter Performing Arts Center of Cal State Long Beach carried all that history honorably. The utterly characteristic program began with choruses and part-songs by Mendelssohn, Brahms and the most famous of all the choir's alums, Schubert.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 24, 1994 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
One of the best things about the Vienna Choir Boys is thatthey they never pretend to be anything but children. They may be vocally blessed, trained and disciplined, but there is no Hollywood hype, no hint at worldliness beyond their 10 to 14 years, no saccharin stabs at calculated cuteness. There is only purity of vocal production and of youth. These qualities distinguished their performance Saturday night at Segerstrom Hall.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 22, 1994 | By BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Six years after Columbus landed in America, some five centuries ago, by the Emperor's decree, the choristers of the Imperial Chapel in Vienna began singing. One of the group's more recent members, having served a five-year stint in the early 19th Century, was Franz Schubert. Early this century, the collapse of the Hapsburg dynasty resulted in a brief hiatus for the choristers.
TRAVEL
November 8, 1987 | NINO LO BELLO, Lo Bello is an American author and newspaperman living in Vienna.
"Hot ticket" is the name of the game for what is dubbed the Sunday morning "Mass of the Vienna Choir Boys." It has been that way at the Hofburg Chapel for as long as anybody can remember. Is there a church anywhere, besides St. Peter's in Rome, that on any given Sunday or Catholic holiday will attract throngs of shoulder-to-shoulder tourists to its highest solemn service?
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1987 | JOHN HENKEN
The Vienna Choir Boys are a tradition, albeit a flexible one--after all, the institution can trace its origin to 1498. To someone who had not seen the group recently, signs of change were apparent Wednesday evening when the venerable choir sang at the Orange County Performing Arts Center. The superficies of the performance were as remembered: The boys wore their middy blouses and offered a mixed bag of classical and pops numbers, gloriously sung.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 30, 1987 | CHRIS PASLES, Times Staff Writer
Every member of the legendary Vienna Choir Boys can tell you how far a roll of toilet paper unrolls. "At all the high-rise hotels they stay at, the boys always want to find how long a roll of toilet paper is," said Wally Adams, company manager for the choir's North American tours for the last 15 years. "Seventeen floors--that's the average, at least for hotel toilet rolls. I don't know about the home variety," he said with a laugh.
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