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ENTERTAINMENT
February 28, 1998
In reference to Jan Herman's story on sex discrimination at the Vienna Philharmonic ("Vienna Philharmonic Still Under Fire," Feb. 27): Since the admission of Anna Lelkes as a full member last year, five sets of auditions have taken place. All auditions, with the exception of the final round, are behind a screen, and no auditioning player may be more than 35 years of age at the time of his or her acceptance into the orchestra. The criteria for the auditions is solely based on excellence of playing in the Viennese tradition and style for which the Vienna Philharmonic is noted.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
BERKELEY - The Vienna Philharmonic is an orchestra that has always been gripped by as well as in the grip of history - the history of Western music, of which it has played a significant part, and the history of Vienna, of which it has also played a significant part. Now "Confronting the Past," has become an official project of the orchestra. In mannerly Viennese fashion, what the orchestra really means is confronting its past. That is what it did in a special residency as part of the UC Berkeley Cal Performances' series that included three concerts in Zellerbach Hall along with a two-day symposium examining the orchestra's history from the outbreak of World War I to the present.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2013 | By David Ng
New details about the Vienna Philharmonic's past Nazi ties have come to light, with research showing that the venerated orchestra contained its fair share of party members during World War II. The new research was carried out by an independent group of historians and has been published on the orchestra's website. The researchers also reported that in 1938, all of the orchestra's Jewish musicians were dismissed. Five of these musicians died in prison or concentration camps. Nearly half of the musicians of the Vienna Philharmonic were members of the Nazi Party in 1942, with 60 out of 123 musicians identified as party members, according to the study.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2014 | Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Italian conductor Daniele Gatti, about whom there has been much interest of late, may have been forced to cancel his appearance with the Vienna Philharmonic at Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall on Monday night due to an inflamed tendon, but he was replaced by an even bigger name, Lorin Maazel. The program of Schubert and Mahler symphonies remained the same. But nothing remained remotely the same. Maazel is a uniquely idiosyncratic interpreter and a uniquely practiced veteran musical manipulator.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By David Ng
As the Vienna Philharmonic prepares for its annual New Year's Day concert that will be seen by television viewers around the world, the renowned orchestra has decided to withdraw honors that it bestowed upon several members of the Nazi Party during World War II. The orchestra had honored at least six high-ranking members of the Nazi Party with its so-called "rings of honor" and other awards. Orchestra leaders decided to posthumously revoke those awards in October, but the news was first reported Friday by Reuters . Among those party members whose awards were revoked are Baldur von Schirach, the Vienna governor from 1940 to 1945; Arthur Seyss-Inquart, an Adolf Hitler cabinet minister; and SS leader Albert Reitter.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2013 | By David Ng
The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra has garnered a loyal television audience around the world with its annual New Year's concert broadcasts, which air in the U.S. on PBS. But this New Year's celebration was somewhat marred by attacks made on the orchestra concerning its past sympathies to the Nazi party. The venerated orchestra has also found itself under renewed attacks for being the least diverse musical ensemble in the western world in terms of race and gender equality. In past years, the orchestra has been picketed during overseas tours by those who perceive its practices to be discriminatory.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1996 | JOHN CANALIS
The City of the Arts is preparing to welcome the Vienna Philharmonic, generally considered one of the world's five best concert orchestras. City officials on Monday agreed to make an exception to municipal codes and allow red and white banners welcoming the symphony to fly from Jan. 17 through March 6, 19 days longer than the 30-day limit typically enforced for promotional material in a public right of way.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 12, 2014 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
BERKELEY - The Vienna Philharmonic is an orchestra that has always been gripped by as well as in the grip of history - the history of Western music, of which it has played a significant part, and the history of Vienna, of which it has also played a significant part. Now "Confronting the Past," has become an official project of the orchestra. In mannerly Viennese fashion, what the orchestra really means is confronting its past. That is what it did in a special residency as part of the UC Berkeley Cal Performances' series that included three concerts in Zellerbach Hall along with a two-day symposium examining the orchestra's history from the outbreak of World War I to the present.
NEWS
March 6, 1997 | ANN CONWAY
The scene: A crush of classical-music buffs rubbed elbows with Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra President Werner Resel and guest conductor Daniel Berenboim at the Center Club in Costa Mesa on Tues- day night. Resel and Berenboim, mu- sic director of the Chicago Symphony Orchestra who is conducting the Vienna musicians on their world tour, were fresh from the orchestra's Orange County premiere Tuesday at Segerstrom Hall in Costa Mesa.
NEWS
February 28, 1997 | TRACY WILKINSON and JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, bowing to the pressure of threatened boycotts and demonstrations in Costa Mesa and New York City, ended 155 years of tradition Thursday by admitting one woman to its illustrious all-male ranks and voting to audition others beginning this summer. The decisions came on the eve of an international tour that brings the world-renowned orchestra to the Orange County Performing Arts Center and Carnegie Hall--the only two U.S. stops on the tour--next week.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2013 | By David Ng
As the Vienna Philharmonic prepares for its annual New Year's Day concert that will be seen by television viewers around the world, the renowned orchestra has decided to withdraw honors that it bestowed upon several members of the Nazi Party during World War II. The orchestra had honored at least six high-ranking members of the Nazi Party with its so-called "rings of honor" and other awards. Orchestra leaders decided to posthumously revoke those awards in October, but the news was first reported Friday by Reuters . Among those party members whose awards were revoked are Baldur von Schirach, the Vienna governor from 1940 to 1945; Arthur Seyss-Inquart, an Adolf Hitler cabinet minister; and SS leader Albert Reitter.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 17, 2013 | By Richard S. Ginell
In the 1980s, when he was in his early 30s, Russian emigré Semyon Bychkov burst onto the scene in a blaze of hype -- recording regularly for Philips, touring with Herbert von Karajan's Berlin Philharmonic.  He is now 60, no longer as loudly touted, yet thinking big in terms of repertoire. Back in 2011, Bychkov and the Vienna Philharmonic blew through Costa Mesa with Mahler's Symphony No. 6; his current guest-conducting schedule is dominated by such epic-scaled blockbusters as Shostakovich's Symphony No. 11, Britten's “War Requiem” and Richard Strauss' “Alpine Symphony.” Falling right into that pattern, Bychkov's agenda with the Los Angeles Philharmonic at Walt Disney Concert Hall on Friday night contained only one piece, a big one: Bruckner's Symphony No. 8. For this mighty, 82-minute-long, alternately thunderous and hushed cathedral of a piece to begin to make its effect, a conductor should have a tight grip on the structures of the four movements, not letting things drift into fragments in search of a whole.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 12, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
I wonder whether the 9,985 who showed up at the Hollywood Bowl on Sunday to hear Gustavo Dudamel conduct a wild and properly woolly concert performance of "Aida" included any of the Hollywood producers responsible for this summer's crop of unsuccessful blockbusters. It would be nice to think so, because Verdi's opera is an object lesson in the art of blockbusterism without the bluster. Bring on the camels and camp it up if you like. But this is also a showstopper opera open to ethereal eloquence.
WORLD
May 19, 2013 | By Jeevan Vasagar
BERLIN - Family archives belonging to a descendant of the composer Richard Wagner are expected to be passed to the German government soon, opening access to researchers who have long sought to shed light on their links to the Nazi regime. With the 200th anniversary of Wagner's birth coming Wednesday, the composer's great-granddaughter, Katharina Wagner, pledged the “prompt” release of family letters. He was born May 22, 1813. Although the contents of the letters are unknown, their release raises the prospect of revelations about the degree to which the Wagners admired and colluded with the Nazis.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 11, 2013 | By David Ng
New details about the Vienna Philharmonic's past Nazi ties have come to light, with research showing that the venerated orchestra contained its fair share of party members during World War II. The new research was carried out by an independent group of historians and has been published on the orchestra's website. The researchers also reported that in 1938, all of the orchestra's Jewish musicians were dismissed. Five of these musicians died in prison or concentration camps. Nearly half of the musicians of the Vienna Philharmonic were members of the Nazi Party in 1942, with 60 out of 123 musicians identified as party members, according to the study.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 3, 2013 | By David Ng
The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra has garnered a loyal television audience around the world with its annual New Year's concert broadcasts, which air in the U.S. on PBS. But this New Year's celebration was somewhat marred by attacks made on the orchestra concerning its past sympathies to the Nazi party. The venerated orchestra has also found itself under renewed attacks for being the least diverse musical ensemble in the western world in terms of race and gender equality. In past years, the orchestra has been picketed during overseas tours by those who perceive its practices to be discriminatory.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2014 | Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Music Critic
Italian conductor Daniele Gatti, about whom there has been much interest of late, may have been forced to cancel his appearance with the Vienna Philharmonic at Renée and Henry Segerstrom Concert Hall on Monday night due to an inflamed tendon, but he was replaced by an even bigger name, Lorin Maazel. The program of Schubert and Mahler symphonies remained the same. But nothing remained remotely the same. Maazel is a uniquely idiosyncratic interpreter and a uniquely practiced veteran musical manipulator.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 1, 2012
SUNDAY The hills are once again alive with the sound of music – courtesy of the storied Vienna Philharmonic — when living legend Julie Andrews, below, hosts "From Vienna: The New Year's Celebration 2012" on a new "Great Performances. " (KOCE, 6 p.m.) What's cooking — or rather, who's cooking? In the new series "Rachael vs. Guy Celebrity Cook-Off," the redoubtable Ms. Ray and the fearsome Mr. Fieri lead the likes of comic Cheech Marin and rapper Coolio in culinary competition.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 28, 2010 | By MARK SWED, Music Critic
Pierre Boulez, everyone says, has mellowed. A half-century ago, he was famed as a maestro with a frighteningly formidable ear, a French composer of frightfully formidable music and a polarizing polemicist. In the '50s, he accused the old tonal composers of being irrelevant. In the '60s, he proposed blowing up old-fashioned German opera houses as an elegant solution to their hostility toward producing modern work. But now Boulez is widely, warmly embraced. Having just turned 85 on Friday, he is no longer feared but feted as one of the great men of music, present and past, in a town that knows what that means.
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