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NEWS
January 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
Government officials from the United States and Laos will meet this week in Vientiane, the Laotian capital, to schedule surveys and excavations in the hunt for American servicemen missing from the Vietnam War, the Pentagon said Tuesday. The meeting will be held Thursday through Saturday. The U.S. delegation will be led by Harriet Isom, the charge d'affaires at the U.S. Embassy in Vientiane.
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WORLD
June 2, 2013 | By Jung-yoon Choi
SEOUL - Laos is coming under increasing international criticism for its unusual decision to turn over to the North Korean government nine defectors, most of them homeless teenagers. The young North Koreans were arrested by Laotian authorities May 10 just across the border from southwestern China, in Laos' Oudomxay province. Also arrested were two South Korean missionaries who had been helping the North Koreans in an attempt to reach South Korea. "We have received credible information that the nine young North Korean defectors were subsequently returned to [North Korea]
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NEWS
December 28, 1987 | From Reuters
The chief of the Soviet KGB secret police, Viktor M. Chebrikov, arrived Sunday in Laos for an official visit, Tass news agency said. Chebrikov, who also is a member of the Soviet Politburo, traveled to the Laotian capital of Vientiane from Vietnam, where his presence in Hanoi with a special adviser to Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev prompted Western speculation of further diplomatic moves to settle the Cambodian conflict.
WORLD
December 21, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
Behind the wheel of her car, Ng Shui Meng last saw her husband in the jeep behind her, following her home for dinner on a Saturday night, she told human rights groups. She lost sight of him somewhere near a police outpost. She came home. He did not. The sudden disappearance of Lao activist Sombath Somphone, 60, has stirred fears for his fate. A grainy video of the Vientiane street where Sombath was last seen shows him being stopped and ultimately taken away, fueling suspicions that the government seized him. But while Laos is the sort of country where something like that might happen, human rights groups say, it is unclear why it would happen to Sombath.
WORLD
June 2, 2013 | By Jung-yoon Choi
SEOUL - Laos is coming under increasing international criticism for its unusual decision to turn over to the North Korean government nine defectors, most of them homeless teenagers. The young North Koreans were arrested by Laotian authorities May 10 just across the border from southwestern China, in Laos' Oudomxay province. Also arrested were two South Korean missionaries who had been helping the North Koreans in an attempt to reach South Korea. "We have received credible information that the nine young North Korean defectors were subsequently returned to [North Korea]
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
An explosion rocked the main post office in central Vientiane, the Laotian capital, injuring four or five people, witnesses said. Bystanders at the adjacent Morning Market said the powerful blast occurred at 11 a.m. The extent of the wounded's injuries was not immediately clear. The Laotian Foreign Ministry declined to comment. Dozens of police and armed soldiers sealed off the area, a rare show of force in the secretive Communist state.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1986 | TAD BARTIMUS, Associated Press
Once the royal Kingdom of a Million Elephants, Laos is now practicing the gospel according to Lenin, isolating itself in a tropical bell jar without a single government computer and only one discotheque. Since the communists took over Laos in 1975, this agrarian nation hemmed in by China, Thailand, Vietnam, Burma and Cambodia has gone backward to the future. Pre-revolution, pro-American leaders are dead, have fled the country or have been deposed to re-education camps.
WORLD
December 21, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
Behind the wheel of her car, Ng Shui Meng last saw her husband in the jeep behind her, following her home for dinner on a Saturday night, she told human rights groups. She lost sight of him somewhere near a police outpost. She came home. He did not. The sudden disappearance of Lao activist Sombath Somphone, 60, has stirred fears for his fate. A grainy video of the Vientiane street where Sombath was last seen shows him being stopped and ultimately taken away, fueling suspicions that the government seized him. But while Laos is the sort of country where something like that might happen, human rights groups say, it is unclear why it would happen to Sombath.
NEWS
March 10, 1987 | Associated Press
An explosion shook the Soviet cultural center in the capital of Laos while Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze was visiting the city, Western diplomatic sources said today. Japan's Kyodo News Service, quoting unidentified Laotian sources, said Monday's explosion was caused by a bomb and occurred 12 hours before Shevardnadze was scheduled to visit the cultural center in Vientiane. The sources were quoted by Kyodo as saying the bomb was set to go off at 6 p.m.
NEWS
February 1, 2004 | David Longstreath, Associated Press Writer
The sun dips low on a crisp afternoon, blazing red and gold across the surface of the Mekong River. The stillness is broken only by the distant growl of a boat's diesel engine. Life in Vientiane is gentle and slow-moving, just like the Mekong. The former French colonial capital was anything but tranquil in the 1970s. To the east, war was raging in Vietnam between communist forces and the United States.
NEWS
February 1, 2004 | David Longstreath, Associated Press Writer
The sun dips low on a crisp afternoon, blazing red and gold across the surface of the Mekong River. The stillness is broken only by the distant growl of a boat's diesel engine. Life in Vientiane is gentle and slow-moving, just like the Mekong. The former French colonial capital was anything but tranquil in the 1970s. To the east, war was raging in Vietnam between communist forces and the United States.
NEWS
August 1, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
An explosion rocked the main post office in central Vientiane, the Laotian capital, injuring four or five people, witnesses said. Bystanders at the adjacent Morning Market said the powerful blast occurred at 11 a.m. The extent of the wounded's injuries was not immediately clear. The Laotian Foreign Ministry declined to comment. Dozens of police and armed soldiers sealed off the area, a rare show of force in the secretive Communist state.
NEWS
January 25, 1989 | From Associated Press
Government officials from the United States and Laos will meet this week in Vientiane, the Laotian capital, to schedule surveys and excavations in the hunt for American servicemen missing from the Vietnam War, the Pentagon said Tuesday. The meeting will be held Thursday through Saturday. The U.S. delegation will be led by Harriet Isom, the charge d'affaires at the U.S. Embassy in Vientiane.
NEWS
December 28, 1987 | From Reuters
The chief of the Soviet KGB secret police, Viktor M. Chebrikov, arrived Sunday in Laos for an official visit, Tass news agency said. Chebrikov, who also is a member of the Soviet Politburo, traveled to the Laotian capital of Vientiane from Vietnam, where his presence in Hanoi with a special adviser to Soviet leader Mikhail S. Gorbachev prompted Western speculation of further diplomatic moves to settle the Cambodian conflict.
NEWS
March 10, 1987 | Associated Press
An explosion shook the Soviet cultural center in the capital of Laos while Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze was visiting the city, Western diplomatic sources said today. Japan's Kyodo News Service, quoting unidentified Laotian sources, said Monday's explosion was caused by a bomb and occurred 12 hours before Shevardnadze was scheduled to visit the cultural center in Vientiane. The sources were quoted by Kyodo as saying the bomb was set to go off at 6 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1986 | TAD BARTIMUS, Associated Press
Once the royal Kingdom of a Million Elephants, Laos is now practicing the gospel according to Lenin, isolating itself in a tropical bell jar without a single government computer and only one discotheque. Since the communists took over Laos in 1975, this agrarian nation hemmed in by China, Thailand, Vietnam, Burma and Cambodia has gone backward to the future. Pre-revolution, pro-American leaders are dead, have fled the country or have been deposed to re-education camps.
MAGAZINE
December 15, 1991 | DIANA SHAW, Diana Shaw is a writer, and a researcher for the movie industry.
One night last spring I lay sleepless and sweltering in the dying city of Haiphong, North Viet Nam, asking myself the question that has taunted so many young Americans caught in faraway places: "What in the hell am I doing here?" . . . Out there, in the makeshift refugee camp I had set up with U.S. Army tents, were more than 12,000 wretched, sick and horribly maimed Vietnamese, most of them either very young or very old.
NEWS
November 14, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
President Bush has announced that he will send a U.S. ambassador to Laos for the first time since the 1975 Communist victories over U.S.-backed forces in Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia. The highest-ranking U.S. official in Vientiane has been a charge d'affaires since ties were downgraded in December, 1975. The decision is based on U.S. satisfaction with Vientiane's cooperation in efforts to resolve the fate of the 528 Americans in Laos who remain unaccounted for as a result of the war in Indochina.
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