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WORLD
May 4, 2010 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
For decades now, the Pho Binh noodle cafe, tucked behind a tangle of parked motorcycles on Ly Chinh Thang Street, has served its trademark dish — "peace noodles." A survivor of Ho Chi Minh City's relentless real estate makeover, the seven-table eatery ladles out bowl after steaming bowl of the soup, made with strips of beef and piles of rice noodles, fresh basil and cilantro. Many of the appreciative customers are unaware of the very unpeaceful plot that unfolded long ago in the family rooms upstairs.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2013 | Times Wire Reports
Khanh Nguyen, 86, a South Vietnamese general who briefly gained control of the government in a coup and went on to lead a "government in exile" in California, died Jan. 11 at a San Jose hospital after struggling with diabetes-related health problems. His death was announced by Chanh Nguyen Huu, who succeeded Nguyen as head of the Garden Grove-based Government of Free Vietnam in Exile. In November 1960, Nguyen helped thwart a coup against South Vietnam's U.S.-backed president, Ngo Dinh Diem, when he mistook the rebels for Viet Cong soldiers and rushed to the president's defense.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1986
I agree with one part of Wolf's assessment of the Vietnam War. His statement, "U.S. forces soundly beat the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong in virtually every large-scale encounter" was probably correct. Unfortunately, the North Vietnamese and Viet Cong weren't polite enough to make the war a series of large-scale tests of military might. In a guerrilla war, our tanks and bombs were no match for booby-trapped bicycles and snipers in trees. Wolf's claim that Vietnam only won at the Paris peace talks and in a propaganda war on college campuses is simply an attempt to rewrite history, Rambo-style.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 30, 2012 | By Christopher Goffard, Los Angeles Times
The remains of a soldier from La Habra missing since he disappeared in Southeast Asia in 1969 with two other U.S. troops have been officially identified by the Department of Defense. Army Sgt. 1st Class William T. Brown was part of a Special Forces unit patrolling in Vietnam's Quang Tri province in November 1969 when enemy forces ambushed the group, which consisted of three American soldiers and six Vietnamese soldiers, according to the Defense Department. Witnesses said all three Americans were injured, with Brown suffering a gunshot wound to the side, but bad weather and the presence of enemy forces prevented a search team from reaching the site of the attack for eight days.
OPINION
December 24, 1989
It is extremely regrettable that the government of Hong Kong decided to force the repatriation of Vietnamese refugees. It is more shameful of the free world to react lightly on this matter. But we cannot blame the people of Hong Kong for being heartless because they have done more than their share of sheltering the refugees. While countries around the world are trying to come up with a solution and accusing each other at the same time for not doing enough, they have overlooked the main causes of the "boat people" problem.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2013 | Times Wire Reports
Khanh Nguyen, 86, a South Vietnamese general who briefly gained control of the government in a coup and went on to lead a "government in exile" in California, died Jan. 11 at a San Jose hospital after struggling with diabetes-related health problems. His death was announced by Chanh Nguyen Huu, who succeeded Nguyen as head of the Garden Grove-based Government of Free Vietnam in Exile. In November 1960, Nguyen helped thwart a coup against South Vietnam's U.S.-backed president, Ngo Dinh Diem, when he mistook the rebels for Viet Cong soldiers and rushed to the president's defense.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2008 | From the Washington Post
Robert Haldane, an Army officer who led the battalion that discovered the infamous Cu Chi tunnels during the Vietnam War, died of cancer March 5 at his home in Alexandria, Va. He was 83. Lt. Gen. Haldane was a lieutenant colonel Jan. 7, 1966, when he was in charge of the American infantry contingent of the 8,000-man U.S.-Australian Operation Crimp. His troops came under fire as soon as they landed near a rubber plantation about 25 miles northwest of Saigon and were mystified when the large numbers of enemy soldiers seemed to vanish in relatively open terrain.
BOOKS
August 3, 1986 | Phillip Knightley, Knightley is author of "The First Casualty, the War Correspondent as Hero, Propagandist and Myth-Maker, From the Crimea to Vietnam" (Harcourt Brace Jovanovich). and
All wars produce legends, and the war in Vietnam was no exception. Perhaps the most enduring legend about Vietnam is that the way the war was reported cost the United States a victory. Robert Elegant, a long-serving Asia expert and a former Vietnam correspondent himself, puts this view succinctly: "For the first time in modern history, the outcome of a war was determined not on the battlefield but on the printed page and, above all, on the television screen . . .
NEWS
April 26, 1989
Arson destroyed a truck parked in front of the Orange County offices of the Vietnamese-language Nguoi Viet Daily News, Westminster Fire Marshal Glen Hines said. A threat, written on a wall in Vietnamese, said, "Nguoi Viet, if you are VC (Viet Cong). We kill." Hines said the newspaper's publisher, Do Ngoc Yen, attributed the incident to a news segment mistakenly broadcast Saturday by the TV studio that shares the editorial offices. The program, "Truyen Hinh Vietnam," apparently offended some ardently anti-Communist members of the Vietnamese community when it showed the Communist flag of Vietnam and Ho Chi Minh's mausoleum in Hanoi as a visual background for a Vietnamese entertainer's song.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 22, 1985
Remember the popular TV series "Lou Grant"? Ed Asner as Lou Grant was, as Doug Smith recently wrote (June 12), "the gruff, honest, hard-hitting, ruggedly sensitive newspaper editor. . . ." But boy, how the times change! At Taft High School last April, Asner spoke to a group of students on the situation in Central America, especially Nicaragua. When a student asked Asner what to expect from those who support the Reagan Administration's position, he said, "They'll lie to you."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 2011 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Reading Lewis Sorley's scalding biography of Army Gen. William Westmoreland, "Westmoreland: The General Who Lost Vietnam," is like watching a slow-motion replay of an oncoming train wreck. The result of this collision is known: failure of the U.S. military mission, 58,000-plus dead Americans, the U.S. divided and at political war with itself, a once-proud military left tarnished, exhausted and in disrepute. Sorley, a West Point graduate and retired Army lieutenant colonel, is unsparing in his analysis of Westmoreland, the top U.S. general in Vietnam from 1964 to 1968 and then Army chief of staff in the latter years of the war. In Sorley's view, the general whose rock-like jaw and prominent eyebrows made him look like a Hollywood casting agent's dream of a military leader was arrogant, duplicitous, vain and not altogether smart.
WORLD
May 4, 2010 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
For decades now, the Pho Binh noodle cafe, tucked behind a tangle of parked motorcycles on Ly Chinh Thang Street, has served its trademark dish — "peace noodles." A survivor of Ho Chi Minh City's relentless real estate makeover, the seven-table eatery ladles out bowl after steaming bowl of the soup, made with strips of beef and piles of rice noodles, fresh basil and cilantro. Many of the appreciative customers are unaware of the very unpeaceful plot that unfolded long ago in the family rooms upstairs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 2009 | Stephen Braun
Driven, cerebral and pugnacious, Robert S. McNamara was the preeminent policymaker behind the massive buildup of American forces in Vietnam between 1964 and 1968. As Defense secretary for two administrations, he wielded blizzards of facts and figures to press the case for deploying military advisors and then ground troops to counter the advance of communist forces in North Vietnam and Viet Cong guerrillas in South Vietnam.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 26, 2008 | Steve Appleford, Special to The Times
The ceremony was always emotional on his farm in upstate New York, where the names of fallen Vietnam War photographers were carved into a stone monument. Eddie Adams had known all of them, and every October he would raise a champagne glass with more than 100 colleagues and students to remember the sacrifices and pictures that once brought the war home to Americans. Adams won a Pulitzer Prize for taking one of the most notorious photographs of the war, capturing the horrific moment when a South Vietnamese lieutenant colonel executed a Viet Cong prisoner on the streets of Saigon in 1968.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2008 | From the Washington Post
Robert Haldane, an Army officer who led the battalion that discovered the infamous Cu Chi tunnels during the Vietnam War, died of cancer March 5 at his home in Alexandria, Va. He was 83. Lt. Gen. Haldane was a lieutenant colonel Jan. 7, 1966, when he was in charge of the American infantry contingent of the 8,000-man U.S.-Australian Operation Crimp. His troops came under fire as soon as they landed near a rubber plantation about 25 miles northwest of Saigon and were mystified when the large numbers of enemy soldiers seemed to vanish in relatively open terrain.
MAGAZINE
June 3, 2007
As I read Dan Neil's column on modern weapons, I recalled an exercise I took part in at Ft. Belvoir, Va., in 1966 ("Bomb Mots," 800 Words, May 6). As combat engineers, our mission was to plant TNT and plastic explosives deep into a hill. When the plunger was pushed by our commanding officer, the side of the hill collapsed and buried a dozen or so outhouses in a gully, simulating a "Viet Cong village." The commanding officer then congratulated us on successfully "wiping out the enemy."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1989
The trial of a Vietnamese-American named Be Tu, who admittedly shot and intended to kill his fellow countryman, came to an end last month when the court sentenced him to seven years in prison. However, there will never be an end for his victim, Khanh Van, who is still living in hiding. Last week, a group calling itself liberators for a free Vietnam vowed retaliation for Be Tu's sentencing. Will there ever be an end to this senseless killing in the name of communism? When will these extremist liberators ever learn that their actions are comparable to the terrorist tactic employed by the Viet Cong.
NEWS
April 21, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Gunmen killed an American military officer today as he was driving to work at the Joint U.S. Military Advisory Group headquarters, U.S. and Filipino officials said. U.S. Embassy spokesman Jerry Huchel said Army Lt. Col. James N. Rowe, 51, was hit by a single bullet in the back of the head. His body was flown to Clark Air Base, 50 miles north of Manila. Rowe's driver, Joaquin Benoya, was wounded in the attack but was able to drive two blocks to the heavily guarded headquarters of the U.S. Military Assistance Group in suburban Quezon City.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 21, 2006 | David Lamb, Special to The Times
Pham Xuan An, who worked as a trusted correspondent for Time magazine during the Vietnam War while holding the rank of colonel in the Viet Cong guerrilla army, died Wednesday. He was 79. An, who had emphysema, died in a hospital in Ho Chi Minh City, according to his family.
WORLD
August 4, 2006 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
"No, I am not a child. I am grown up and already strong in the face of hardships, but at this minute why do I want so much a mother's hand to care for me? ... Please come to me and hold my hand when I am so lonely, love me and give me strength to travel all the hard sections of the road ahead." -- Final diary entry of Dr. Dang Thuy Tram Duc Pho, Vietnam, June 1970 * HANOI -- As a young doctor in a country at war, Dang Thuy Tram chose a life of sacrifice.
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