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Viet Dinh

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NATIONAL
September 18, 2002 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Viet Dinh is working the room. Viet Dinh, it seems, is always working a room. The room itself isn't much, at least not by the standards of one of the rising stars of the Bush administration. A hundred or so faculty members and supporters at Saint Francis University in rural Pennsylvania are lunching in a nondescript student center to hear Dinh, advisor to U.S. Atty. Gen.
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NATIONAL
May 14, 2003 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department is losing another key foot soldier in its war on terrorism. Viet Dinh, the chief architect of the USA Patriot Act, the controversial post-Sept. 11 legislation that greatly expanded law enforcement agencies' powers to track terrorists, submitted his resignation to the White House on Tuesday, an administration official said. Dinh, 35, plans to return to teaching at Georgetown University's law school.
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NATIONAL
May 14, 2003 | Richard B. Schmitt, Times Staff Writer
The Justice Department is losing another key foot soldier in its war on terrorism. Viet Dinh, the chief architect of the USA Patriot Act, the controversial post-Sept. 11 legislation that greatly expanded law enforcement agencies' powers to track terrorists, submitted his resignation to the White House on Tuesday, an administration official said. Dinh, 35, plans to return to teaching at Georgetown University's law school.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2002 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Viet Dinh is working the room. Viet Dinh, it seems, is always working a room. The room itself isn't much, at least not by the standards of one of the rising stars of the Bush administration. A hundred or so faculty members and supporters at Saint Francis University in rural Pennsylvania are lunching in a nondescript student center to hear Dinh, advisor to U.S. Atty. Gen.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2011 | By Meg James, Los Angeles Times
The furor over Rupert Murdoch's management of News Corp. continues to reverberate. The mogul's daughter, Elisabeth Murdoch, had been scheduled to join her father and two brothers on the board of News Corp. after selling her British television production company to News Corp. this year. However, the company said Friday that those plans — announced in March by Rupert Murdoch, chairman and chief executive of the media conglomerate — had been put on hold. "Elisabeth Murdoch suggested to the independent directors some weeks ago that she felt it would be inappropriate to include her nomination to the board of News Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2012 | By Joe Flint
News Corp. is changing the reporting structure of its management and standards committee, which the media giant created in response to the ethics scandal at its British newspaper unit. The committee's purpose is to cooperate with the ongoing probe into News Corp.'s British newspapers as well as to serve as something akin to an internal affairs division. Last month, it issued a lengthy report that gave a clean bill of health toNews Corp.'s the Times and the Sunday Times. Joel Klein, a News Corp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2005
Sunday Queen of Sheba: The Bowers Museum will present "Yemen: Land of Queen of Sheba" from 1:30 to 2:30 p.m. $5, free to members and with museum admission. 2002 N. Main St., Santa Ana. Information: (714) 567-3600 or www.bowers.org Monday Breast Cancer: The Chapman University Mini-Medical School will present "Breast Health," about the myths and facts of breast cancer. 7 to 9 p.m. Free. Chapman University, Beckman Center. One University Drive, Orange.
NEWS
April 6, 2002 | From Associated Press
The U.S. Sentencing Commission indicated Friday that it will ask Congress to change drug laws to reduce differences in punishments involving crack cocaine and powder cocaine, a change the Justice Department believes is unnecessary. The sentencing commission, in a statement, said it was concerned not only about whether cocaine punishments were fair but also "whether the penalties are perceived as fair."
NATIONAL
January 16, 2003 | From Associated Press
The federal guarantee of 12 weeks off to care for children or ailing relatives should apply to every worker, the Bush administration argued Wednesday, as the Supreme Court considered scaling back a law intended to ease work and family conflicts. The court could use the case to extend a line of rulings favoring states' rights, or it could mark a detour from that legal path.
OPINION
December 4, 2003
The Pentagon's announcement Tuesday that its officials have agreed that an American citizen held for 18 months may finally consult with a lawyer is at once a relief and scary. For a year and a half, Yaser Esam Hamdi has been locked in a military brig at the mercy of Pentagon officials engaged in what they blandly term "intelligence collection." Hamdi -- who, we repeat, is an American citizen -- is charged with no crime, yet his captors have denied him a lawyer and any contact with his family.
NEWS
April 25, 2011 | By James Oliphant, Washington Bureau
In a highly unusual move, the lawyer retained by House Republicans to defend the law that denies federal recognition to legally married gay couples has resigned from his law firm after pressure from gay rights groups moved the firm to withdraw from the representation. Paul Clement, the former U.S. solicitor general, made his resignation letter public—a decision that telegraphs the size of rift between Clement and his former employer, the well-known Atlanta-based firm King and Spalding.
BUSINESS
October 11, 2011 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
An influential consulting firm is advising that shareholders vote News Corp. Chairman Rupert Murdoch and 12 others — including his two sons — off the board of directors of the media giant less than two weeks before the company's annual meeting. Institutional Shareholders Services Inc. said Monday that an overhaul was necessary in light of the phone hacking scandal that continues to rock News Corp. and has led to government inquiries of the company in England and the United States.
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