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BUSINESS
September 18, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Y Mum Eban saw the future 10 years ago. The first thing he did was abandon the corn and beans his family had been growing for generations. The second was to plant as many coffee trees as he could get his hands on. Like hundreds of others who have rushed into the central highlands to capitalize on Vietnam's coffee bonanza, that decision made Eban a wealthy man, by local standards, with an annual income of more than $3,000--nearly 10 times the national average.
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BUSINESS
September 18, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Y Mum Eban saw the future 10 years ago. The first thing he did was abandon the corn and beans his family had been growing for generations. The second was to plant as many coffee trees as he could get his hands on. Like hundreds of others who have rushed into the central highlands to capitalize on Vietnam's coffee bonanza, that decision made Eban a wealthy man, by local standards, with an annual income of more than $3,000--nearly 10 times the national average.
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BUSINESS
March 23, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
From Rice Importer to Exporter: Reforms that changed Vietnam from a rice importer to a major exporter have helped produce a record southern spring crop even without fertilizer from the former Soviet Union, according to Vietnam's agriculture minister. Nguyen Cong Tan, 57, said that only 5% of all farms are now state-run, compared to more than 85% before 1987.
NEWS
March 3, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last summer, a remarkable event happened in this isolated commune: Peasant farmers protesting corruption, high taxes and government unresponsiveness rebelled against local leaders, taking hostages and disrupting the rice harvest. The uprising, which spread to other locales and lasted several months, unleashed nightmarish visions in Hanoi.
NEWS
March 3, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last summer, a remarkable event happened in this isolated commune: Peasant farmers protesting corruption, high taxes and government unresponsiveness rebelled against local leaders, taking hostages and disrupting the rice harvest. The uprising, which spread to other locales and lasted several months, unleashed nightmarish visions in Hanoi.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1995 | From Reuters
Communist Vietnam needs to keep its rural workers down on the farm to tackle a severe unemployment problem as it moves rapidly toward a market economy, international experts say. Stabilizing unemployment at its current level of 6% requires an economic growth rate of more than 10%, the International Labor Organization said in a report released last week. Vietnam recorded growth of 8.8% in gross domestic product last year.
NEWS
May 6, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Hard hit by shortages across the board, Vietnam suffers most in the area that is critical for many underdeveloped countries--a lack of food. Three years of stalled crop production have reduced the amount of food per capita by 8% since 1985. There is little money in the treasury to buy food abroad, and in a sort of Catch-22, the country's prime prospect for building financial reserves is exporting food. Malnutrition, a constant hazard in Vietnam, has worsened. So has the budget deficit.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1995 | From Reuters
Communist Vietnam needs to keep its rural workers down on the farm to tackle a severe unemployment problem as it moves rapidly toward a market economy, international experts say. Stabilizing unemployment at its current level of 6% requires an economic growth rate of more than 10%, the International Labor Organization said in a report released last week. Vietnam recorded growth of 8.8% in gross domestic product last year.
BUSINESS
July 25, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rice Deal Made With Los Angeles Firm: American Rice, a subsidiary of Los Angeles-based Erly Industries, has formed a joint venture with the Vietnamese ministry of agriculture to upgrade and operate a rice-processing plant south of Ho Chi Minh City that will have a production capacity of about 300,000 tons a year.
NEWS
May 6, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Hard hit by shortages across the board, Vietnam suffers most in the area that is critical for many underdeveloped countries--a lack of food. Three years of stalled crop production have reduced the amount of food per capita by 8% since 1985. There is little money in the treasury to buy food abroad, and in a sort of Catch-22, the country's prime prospect for building financial reserves is exporting food. Malnutrition, a constant hazard in Vietnam, has worsened. So has the budget deficit.
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