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March 14, 1995 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a bright, clear afternoon, a video crew has set up at Laguna Beach's Heisler Park. The subject of the shoot is a rising young singer who has recorded three albums, toured Europe several times and Australia once. In some cities she plays to thousands, but the park-goers who stroll by on this day look on curiously without recognizing her. Huong Tho is being interviewed by Trang Nguyen for an entertainment news program on Costa Mesa-based Little Saigon Television.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2014 | By Anh Do
The colorful Tet festival is going mainstream, moving beyond the borders of bustling Little Saigon to a sprawling county fairgrounds where it is expected to attract thousands who never ventured into the Vietnamese American district. Nora Simmons is among those who will be a first-time visitor to the Lunar New Year celebration, the largest Tet gathering outside Vietnam, when it begins Friday. The Mission Viejo resident admits that exploring the Vietnamese cultural enclave that stretches across the face of central Orange County seems intimidating and she worried that it's a "wild place.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 9, 1991 | BILL KOHLHAASE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When Sean and Giana Pham left Vietnam for the United States in 1975, one thing they didn't leave behind was their deep appreciation for the popular music of their homeland. Once in this country, they developed another love: contemporary Western jazz. Combining these two passions has resulted in one of the most unusual musical hybrids in the world of jazz fusion.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In most countries, workers would have cheered the news that the Vietnamese received the other day: The workweek was being cut to 40 hours, with Saturdays off. But the government's announcement reducing the workweek by eight hours brought mostly grumbling in this industrious country where leisure time is all but unknown and people think nothing of laboring seven days a week, month after month.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 12, 1991 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The small percussion instrument Mai Nguyen holds in her hand hints of the international influences in Vietnam's past. More than 1,000 years of Chinese domination in Indochina are reflected in a dragon design, inlaid with mother-of-pearl. The metal discs that produce the ringing sound are revealed on a closer look to be French coins, dated 1925, reminders of the more recent French rule of a troubled nation.
NEWS
March 14, 1995 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pham Duy is doubtless the most famous--and prolific--living writer of popular Vietnamese songs. Yet when he goes out in Little Saigon and elsewhere, he is never mobbed and rarely is even approached. "The Vietnamese never express themselves that way," he says. "They don't ask for autographs. They just look silently. . . . They're very shy, I think, my people." Such reticence hardly is a reflection of his popularity.
NEWS
February 13, 1992 | DENNIS McLELLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ask Khoi Nguyen, an Anaheim medical technician, if he's read any good books lately, and he mentions one you won't find on the bestseller lists. It's "Thien Duong Mu" ("Blind Heaven") by Duong Thu Huong, a now-imprisoned dissident novelist in Vietnam whose books are reprinted in the United States and France.
NEWS
May 29, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With all the Vietnamese restaurants that have proliferated in California in recent years, perhaps it is only fitting that a cafe featuring the cuisine of Melrose Avenue should strike pay dirt in Ho Chi Minh City. Down to the cane furniture and amorphous watercolors on the walls, the City Bar and Grill is an unmistakable Los Angeles import in the former capital of South Vietnam. Take the menu.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 17, 1992 | THUAN LE
Truong Le first fell in love with the Beatles in Saigon in 1970 when his father brought home one of the group's albums. The 7-year-old could not have asked for a better introduction to English-language songs. Now, 22 years later, he wants to bring Vietnamese sounds to the American people via New Age music. He has started recording real-life sounds, such as a rainstorm, to use as background for his guitar and hopes to have an album of his own produced in the future.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1990 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Born in a refugee's basement, a desktop publishing operation here has become the largest purveyor of Vietnamese-language books outside Vietnam. Using two rickety presses and low-tech collating and book-binding machines, the Xuan Thu press has since 1976 been churning out everything from ancient Vietnamese classics to modern kung fu novels--the memoirs of generals and postwar prisoners, epic romances and English textbooks, cookbooks, dictionaries and children's books.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 1999 | SCARLET CHENG, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
When the smoke clears, the art remains. "A Winding River: The Journey of Contemporary Art in Vietnam" is a meander through the last 70 years of Vietnamese art, and despite well-publicized protests by anti-Communist Vietnamese activists, the exhibit at the Bowers Museum of Cultural Art in Santa Ana is surprising for being both aesthetically accessible and politically benign.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1998 | BENJAMIN EPSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Eyes to the East? Head west to Pacific Coast Highway. Exquisite Asian artifacts can be found in Laguna Beach at Khyber Pass and Warren Imports. No less than five dealers in Asian carpets, including Orient Handel, ply their wares along a stretch of Corona del Mar. Aysia 101, a smart-looking new restaurant, just opened on Mariners Mile in Newport Beach. MORNING, 1,2 Khyber Pass specializes in rugs, art and artifacts from Afghanistan.
NEWS
August 17, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vietnam is a country run by the old but shaped by the young. The old are a product of war and communism, the young of peace and economic opportunity. The former fear change, the latter demand it. However the battle for the soul of Vietnam sorts itself out, the reality is that a whopping 80% of Vietnam's 77 million people are younger than 40.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 1998 | BRETT JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ever since Tuteyanh Nguyen immigrated to Chatsworth from Vietnam in 1992, she has balanced her partially American upbringing with her desire to maintain a cultural connection to her homeland. To strengthen that link, she will be one of 15 girls of the Vietnamese Eucharistic Youth Council of St. Joseph the Worker parish performing traditional Vietnamese dances at the church this afternoon.
NEWS
May 3, 1998 | IAN STEWART, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Disgraced and defeated, deemed ideologically impure, South Vietnamese Army Col. Tran Thanh Trai was shunted off to a Communist labor camp in 1975. It was the price paid for lining up on the wrong side of Vietnam's bitter war. Today, a respected and honored surgeon, Trai is an elected lawmaker in Communist Vietnam's 450-seat National Assembly--one of only three independent legislators in a nation of one-party politics.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1997 | From Associated Press
In the world of conformist communist Vietnam, the once-banned Caodai religious sect is a splash of color with a zeal for the garish. Adherents commune with the spirits of historical figures, including Joan of Arc, Victor Hugo, Vladimir Lenin and, for more lighthearted seances, Charlie Chaplin. They look to the spirits of such people because of strong personality traits that are models to others.
NEWS
March 13, 1995 | ZAN DUBIN
April 13: Performance of traditional music by Nguyen Thuyet Phong and ensemble. Time and place to be announced. Organized by the Vietnamese American Arts and Letters Assn. (VAALA). (714) 537-8352. * April 26 and 27, 8 p.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1997 | From Associated Press
In the world of conformist communist Vietnam, the once-banned Caodai religious sect is a splash of color with a zeal for the garish. Adherents commune with the spirits of historical figures, including Joan of Arc, Victor Hugo, Vladimir Lenin and, for more lighthearted seances, Charlie Chaplin. They look to the spirits of such people because of strong personality traits that are models to others.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1995 | ZAN DUBIN, Times Staff Writer
Month after month, the terror returned whenever Ann Phong looked at the ocean. During four unspeakable days at sea, death felt as close as the waves that ceaselessly licked the sides of the boat. Painting, however, has helped Phong confront the memories of her flight from Vietnam a dozen years ago. By giving form and color to her fear and pain with roiling, vivid tableaux, she has found release. "The more I hide it," she says, "the more it hurts me."
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 1995 | ZAN DUBIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ann Phong's future looked as barren as the fields mowed down by the war machine. She felt doomed as an artist, to be used solely as an instrument of propaganda for the new Vietnamese Communist regime. So when the chance came to escape by boat, she took it, even though it meant leaving her parents and siblings behind, perhaps forever. "I love my art too much," she says. "I realized I had to sacrifice something else."
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