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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1990 | SY MONTGOMERY, Montgomery writes about nature and science and lives in Hancock, N.H. and
In Vietnamese mythology, the Eastern Sarus crane is the bird sent from heaven to ferry to God those destined for eternal life. It is an apt species for such a heavenly mission: An other-worldly looking being, it is the tallest flighted bird in the world at five feet, with a red head, long slender beak and slate gray body. Huge yet ethereal, migrating between water and sky, it courts its mate while dancing to an inner music, bowing, arching, springing into the air with wings spread in ecstasy.
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NEWS
November 24, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here in remotest Vietnam, amid the ghosts of a defeated French army, Indochina's most famous battlefield sits in a jungled mountain valley, largely forgotten by all but historians and a handful of Vietnamese visitors. Although the town keeps waiting for tourists, few ever come, and the battlefield, as pristine as it is ignored, may not be able to hold out much longer against a threat that seems unusual in such a far-off place--urban encroachment.
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BUSINESS
June 22, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Two U.S. Firms Plan Beach Resorts in Vietnam: BBI Investment Group of Chevy Chase, Md., and DeMatteis Construction Corp. of Elmont, N.Y. said they will build projects worth $380 million near Da Nang in Non Nuoc, also known as China Beach. BBI will build the bigger of the two--to consist of four hotels, a conference center and a golf course--as part of a joint venture with a Vietnamese partner. It will be the biggest investment so far by a foreign firm in Vietnam.
NEWS
September 6, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New hotels are sprouting here like mushrooms. A Hilton is under construction. So is a Sheraton. There's talk of a Marriott. Six other luxurious international hotels are nearing completion. But with tourism dropping--particularly here in Vietnam's capital and one of Asia's loveliest cities--tourist industry officials are starting to ask: Who's going to fill all these rooms?
BUSINESS
April 13, 1992
Our county has become frivolous with our tax dollars, and I'm tired of it. Before our county spends money on fancy security systems and gives health check bonuses to employees, it needs to replace the pool at Ventura High School and paint its buildings. The young people deserve the best, not the county employees. Do you give your family the scraps from your table after you have eaten well?
BUSINESS
January 31, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New World Bank Loan OKd: The organization said it has approved an interest-free loan of $96 million for Vietnam to develop its agricultural and rubber industries and increase farmers' incomes. The 40-year loan is the third to Vietnam by the World Bank since October. The other loans, totaling $228 million, were for highways and education.
NEWS
September 6, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
New hotels are sprouting here like mushrooms. A Hilton is under construction. So is a Sheraton. There's talk of a Marriott. Six other luxurious international hotels are nearing completion. But with tourism dropping--particularly here in Vietnam's capital and one of Asia's loveliest cities--tourist industry officials are starting to ask: Who's going to fill all these rooms?
NEWS
August 24, 1992 | ALAN C. MILLER and STU GLAUBERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Puongpun Sananikone is fond of quoting a Chinese aphorism: "Out of misfortune good things come." Now, the international management consultant is striving to make it apply to the war-scarred country that he reluctantly fled 17 years ago. Sananikone, a member of one of Laos' most prominent industrial families, came to the United States in 1975 to avoid detention in a hard-labor "re-education camp" by the new Communist regime.
NEWS
November 24, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Here in remotest Vietnam, amid the ghosts of a defeated French army, Indochina's most famous battlefield sits in a jungled mountain valley, largely forgotten by all but historians and a handful of Vietnamese visitors. Although the town keeps waiting for tourists, few ever come, and the battlefield, as pristine as it is ignored, may not be able to hold out much longer against a threat that seems unusual in such a far-off place--urban encroachment.
TRAVEL
May 4, 1997 | CARL DUNCAN, Duncan is an American freelance writer living on Salt Spring Island, Canada, in British Columbia
As we climb stairs up the largest of the Marble Mountains, we lose count of how many times various vendors, selling drinks and marble carvings, tell us, "You can see China Beach from the top." Our path takes us into Quon Lin Cave, a tall cavern that has been used as a place of worship--first Hindu, then Buddhist--for the last 1,500 years. Three shafts of sunlight illuminate the cave from holes high above. During the '60s the cavern housed a clandestine Viet Cong hospital.
TRAVEL
May 4, 1997 | CARL DUNCAN, Duncan is an American freelance writer living on Salt Spring Island, Canada, in British Columbia
As we climb stairs up the largest of the Marble Mountains, we lose count of how many times various vendors, selling drinks and marble carvings, tell us, "You can see China Beach from the top." Our path takes us into Quon Lin Cave, a tall cavern that has been used as a place of worship--first Hindu, then Buddhist--for the last 1,500 years. Three shafts of sunlight illuminate the cave from holes high above. During the '60s the cavern housed a clandestine Viet Cong hospital.
BUSINESS
July 18, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hilton Announces Plans to Build in Vietnam: Hilton Hotels Corp. plans to build a 500-room luxury hotel south of Ho Chi Minh City. The hotel would open in 1997 and accommodate visitors to a planned world trade and civic center complex. "This is a very preliminary, non-binding agreement," a spokeswoman said.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
New World Bank Loan OKd: The organization said it has approved an interest-free loan of $96 million for Vietnam to develop its agricultural and rubber industries and increase farmers' incomes. The 40-year loan is the third to Vietnam by the World Bank since October. The other loans, totaling $228 million, were for highways and education.
NEWS
August 24, 1992 | ALAN C. MILLER and STU GLAUBERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Puongpun Sananikone is fond of quoting a Chinese aphorism: "Out of misfortune good things come." Now, the international management consultant is striving to make it apply to the war-scarred country that he reluctantly fled 17 years ago. Sananikone, a member of one of Laos' most prominent industrial families, came to the United States in 1975 to avoid detention in a hard-labor "re-education camp" by the new Communist regime.
BUSINESS
April 13, 1992
Our county has become frivolous with our tax dollars, and I'm tired of it. Before our county spends money on fancy security systems and gives health check bonuses to employees, it needs to replace the pool at Ventura High School and paint its buildings. The young people deserve the best, not the county employees. Do you give your family the scraps from your table after you have eaten well?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1990 | SY MONTGOMERY, Montgomery writes about nature and science and lives in Hancock, N.H. and
In Vietnamese mythology, the Eastern Sarus crane is the bird sent from heaven to ferry to God those destined for eternal life. It is an apt species for such a heavenly mission: An other-worldly looking being, it is the tallest flighted bird in the world at five feet, with a red head, long slender beak and slate gray body. Huge yet ethereal, migrating between water and sky, it courts its mate while dancing to an inner music, bowing, arching, springing into the air with wings spread in ecstasy.
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