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Vietnam Economy

NEWS
August 17, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vietnam is a country run by the old but shaped by the young. The old are a product of war and communism, the young of peace and economic opportunity. The former fear change, the latter demand it. However the battle for the soul of Vietnam sorts itself out, the reality is that a whopping 80% of Vietnam's 77 million people are younger than 40.
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NEWS
March 3, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last summer, a remarkable event happened in this isolated commune: Peasant farmers protesting corruption, high taxes and government unresponsiveness rebelled against local leaders, taking hostages and disrupting the rice harvest. The uprising, which spread to other locales and lasted several months, unleashed nightmarish visions in Hanoi.
BUSINESS
February 15, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Government officials in Indochina were almost smug when Asia's economic miracle evaporated last summer in clouds of red ink, bankrupt companies and crashing stock markets. "We're immune," they declared, and at first glance there was good cause to believe that the mini-economies of Vietnam, Laos and Cambodia were. None of the countries has a stock exchange. Their currencies are nonconvertible. Their industries are, to varying degrees, state-run and unconcerned with the bottom line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 1997 | TINI TRAN and TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Two years ago, Hung Phuong Nguyen spent countless hours organizing demonstrations in Little Saigon and writing angry letters to President Clinton opposing normalization with his homeland. Thursday, he met news that the U.S. is proposing to tear down all barriers to trade and investment with the Communist government of Vietnam with quiet acceptance. "Only economics can open the door to democracy," he said.
NEWS
September 26, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After several years of heady growth and enthusiastic support from international investors and donors, Vietnam finds itself facing a sobering reality: Those forecasts that it would soon join the elite fraternity of Asian nations known as economic "tigers" were wildly premature.
NEWS
February 17, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even now, in the dreary days of winter, this Communist capital of 3 million people moves with a sense of purpose that is unmistakable: This is the springtime of Hanoi's renaissance, and the city is so alive with energy you can almost taste the commerce in the air. Nothing and no one is idle.
NEWS
August 7, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State Warren Christopher delivered a strongly worded speech on freedom and democracy to a group of Vietnamese students Sunday, telling them that their country "should move beyond just opening its doors." In a clear statement of American values aimed not just at Vietnam but at all of Asia, Christopher praised the spread of freely elected governments around the world. He also spoke repeatedly of the importance of free markets and the rule of law.
NEWS
August 6, 1995 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vietnam began pressing hard Saturday for a series of economic benefits from the United States after finally obtaining the formal diplomatic ties that open the way for those privileges. In ceremonies today, Secretary of State Warren Christopher looked on solemnly, his right hand folded across the chest of his dark gray, double-breasted suit, as the American flag was raised over the new U.S. Embassy in Hanoi. The same building had served as the U.S. liaison office here since January.
NEWS
May 29, 1995 | JIM MANN
What is about to happen in Vietnam will give new meaning to the idea that history is full of irony. For three decades, Vietnam's Communist leaders fought one of history's most successful, determined and bloody guerrilla wars, at an astounding cost of about 3 million lives. At the time, the goal was not only to win national independence but also to free the economy from foreign domination and the supposed evils of capitalism. Now, in 1995, what do the new leaders of Hanoi want most of all?
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