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Vietnam Elections

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NEWS
April 20, 1987 | United Press International
Voters went to the polls Sunday across Vietnam in elections seen as part of a campaign to revitalize the economy and to replace the aged hard-liners who presided over decades of war and revolution. After a shake-up in electoral rules and a purge of the Communist Party, the elections for the 496-seat National Assembly and local people's councils were expected to be the most democratic in 12 years of Communist rule of a unified country.
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NEWS
July 21, 1997 | From Associated Press
Vietnamese voted for national lawmakers Sunday in elections that are expected to start a swing toward a younger generation of Communist leaders. All 450 seats of the National Assembly were being filled. Ballots were being counted by hand, and final results were expected to be announced in a week. The vote probably will give the National Assembly a younger face. Only a fifth of the outgoing members sought reelection.
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NEWS
July 21, 1997 | From Associated Press
Vietnamese voted for national lawmakers Sunday in elections that are expected to start a swing toward a younger generation of Communist leaders. All 450 seats of the National Assembly were being filled. Ballots were being counted by hand, and final results were expected to be announced in a week. The vote probably will give the National Assembly a younger face. Only a fifth of the outgoing members sought reelection.
NEWS
September 25, 1992 | From Reuters
Reformer and free-marketeer Vo Van Kiet was reelected Vietnam's premier Thursday for a five-year term and said his appointment shows that the people back economic reforms. Kiet promised to wage war on corruption. "Corruption is a burning issue for the whole party and whole society," he told the Voice of Vietnam radio station.
NEWS
September 25, 1992 | From Reuters
Reformer and free-marketeer Vo Van Kiet was reelected Vietnam's premier Thursday for a five-year term and said his appointment shows that the people back economic reforms. Kiet promised to wage war on corruption. "Corruption is a burning issue for the whole party and whole society," he told the Voice of Vietnam radio station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1997
Re "Curtis LeMay Was Right About Vietnam," Commentary, May 30: Gen. LeMay had a theory that more bombing would have ended the Vietnam War sooner. (But what about their civil war?) I have a theory also. Following the French defeat in Vietnam, mandated elections were not allowed by the United States and the South Vietnamese regime. Had these gone forward, Ho Chi Minh would have walked, not marched, into Saigon and by electoral, not civil war, victory. The Vietnam War could have been avoided with the same result for that country, then and today.
NEWS
January 11, 1994 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton Administration announced plans Monday to open a formal dialogue on human rights with Vietnam in one of the last steps toward lifting the U.S. trade embargo against Hanoi. Both State Department and National Security Council officials have recommended that President Clinton remove the 19-year-old embargo, according to Administration and private sources in Washington. They said Clinton probably will act in late January or early February after Congress returns.
BOOKS
April 22, 2001 | TOWNSEND HOOPES, Townsend Hoopes is the author of numerous books, including "The Limits of Intervention," 'The Devil and John Foster Dulles" and "FDR and the Creation of the U.N."
From the vantage point of 2001, aspects of the Vietnam saga seem surreal, but they churned and confounded American society for more than 25 years. "A Grand Delusion" is yet another exhaustively comprehensive indictment of the disastrous encounter between the United States and Vietnam, but its focus on the politics of the struggle between the Senate and the presidency provides a perspective different from most other accounts.
NEWS
April 20, 1987 | United Press International
Voters went to the polls Sunday across Vietnam in elections seen as part of a campaign to revitalize the economy and to replace the aged hard-liners who presided over decades of war and revolution. After a shake-up in electoral rules and a purge of the Communist Party, the elections for the 496-seat National Assembly and local people's councils were expected to be the most democratic in 12 years of Communist rule of a unified country.
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