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June 30, 1991 | DIANNE KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her mother sent her here, she says, fidgeting a little, breaking into a grin, not quite sure if happiness is called for or not. People around her are speaking English, a language that she recognizes only for its incomprehensible sounds. When she speaks, her words are Vietnamese. Thu-Ha Le has been in Orange County's Little Saigon a week. She was born in Bien Hoa on the outskirts of that other Saigon, the one that no longer officially exists.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 27, 1996 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Hung Thanh Mai, the Anaheim man accused of killing a CHP officer during a traffic stop, the 10 days since his arrest have been the "worst of my life." Mai declined Friday to talk about charges that he killed Officer Don Burt, who was shot seven times. But the 25-year-old suspect emphatically denied allegations that he is tied to a roving gang based in Long Beach. "I was never in a gang," said Mai, who immigrated to Orange County from Vietnam in 1975 with his paternal grandmother.
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NEWS
April 5, 1992 | JOHN NEEDHAM and THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Kiem Do stares at the photographs of his family, his home and his church half a world away, momentarily oblivious to screaming children and shouting adults in the interview room of the Orange County Jail. He looks at the simple cottage where he spent the first 19 years of his life, gazes at the pain-filled faces of his mother and brother-in-law. He buries his face in one hand and cries silently. "I miss my country so much," he says.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 12, 1995 | RICK VANDERKNYFF, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A series of cultural events designed to commemorate two decades since the first Vietnamese refugees' arrival has been beset by behind-the-scenes political turmoil over the scheduling of a fund-raising event. Organizers of Project 20 have been careful to articulate that their goal is to celebrate the accomplishments of Vietnamese Americans.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | DIANNE KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her mother sent her here, she says, fidgeting a little, breaking into a grin, not quite sure if happiness is called for or not. People around her are speaking in English, a language that she recognizes only for its incomprehensible sounds. When she speaks, her words are in Vietnamese. Thu-Ha Le has been in Little Saigon a week. She was born in Bien-hoa, on the outskirts of that other Saigon, the one that no longer officially exists. It was the Year of the Chicken, 22 years ago on Christmas Day.
NEWS
December 20, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr. and MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writers
Compassion, guilt and vivid images of near-swamped boatloads of half-dead Vietnamese on the shores of Southeast Asia drew the Western powers to Geneva in July, 1979. A deal was struck. The Vietnamese "boat people" would be given homes and new lives in the West. By that summer, more than 350,000 had reached rude camps in Thailand, Malaysia, Indonesia and other Southeast Asian countries. Few conditions were placed on their resettlement. They would be taken in.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1990 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For four years, Hau Nguyen was imprisoned in Vietnamese re-education camps. On a diet of only three ears of corn a day, the former South Vietnamese army captain was forced to hike 10 miles into the jungle, chop trees into 14-foot sections and drag them back to be sold by the Communists for firewood.
NEWS
August 4, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Vietnam on Wednesday abruptly suspended plans to participate with U.S. technicians in a joint search for the remains of missing American servicemen. The Reagan Administration then accused Hanoi of breaking a year-old promise to cooperate on the issue. The dispute, touched off by an angry statement issued in Hanoi by Foreign Minister Nguyen Co Thach, appears to reverse a recent warming trend in the relationship between the United States and Vietnam.
NEWS
June 16, 1988
The Hong Kong government tightened its policies on Vietnamese refugees to stem the growing flow of "boat people" arriving in the British colony. Starting today, new arrivals must prove that they face political persecution at home and are not just seeking a better economic future. If they cannot, they will be put into closed camps to await return to Vietnam. Officials said that about 90% of the Vietnamese refugees will not qualify for refugee status.
NEWS
August 1, 1989 | CHRIS WOODYARD and DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writers
An agreement that would free thousands of former Vietnamese prisoners to emigrate to the United States was hailed in Orange County Monday as "a major breakthrough," and one that could mean reunification of many families in the largest Vietnamese community in the nation. "Yes, this is good news because we have been waiting for so long," said Nhu Hao T. Duong, executive director for the Community Resources Opportunity Project in Santa Ana. "To us, this is a major breakthrough."
NEWS
June 15, 1994 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a summer day in 1990, then 26-year-old Hao Thi Tran, her mother and two sisters were on a plane about to land at Los Angeles International Airport. The four women had changed into ao dais , the traditional Vietnamese dresses that are worn over flowing pants. They were anxious to be reunited with family members they had not seen in 10 years. "We stepped off the plane, and they recognized us first," said Tran, the youngest of nine children.
NEWS
April 5, 1992 | JOHN NEEDHAM and THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Kiem Do stares at the photographs of his family, his home and his church half a world away, momentarily oblivious to screaming children and shouting adults in the interview room of the Orange County Jail. He looks at the simple cottage where he spent the first 19 years of his life, gazes at the pain-filled faces of his mother and brother-in-law. He buries his face in one hand and cries silently. "I miss my country so much," he says.
NEWS
July 4, 1991 | Dianne Klein
Trang Nguyen would ask about her father, of course. All the Amerasians do, with words or with just a feeling that swells their hearts. The responses they get in return, iced silence mostly, almost invariably disappoint. "My mother, my grandmother would tell me, 'Look in the mirror and you will see your father,' " Trang says. Then she smiles very wide. Her mother and grandmother were right. The eyes and ears--and is it the nose too?--are his.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | DIANNE KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her mother sent her here, she says, fidgeting a little, breaking into a grin, not quite sure if happiness is called for or not. People around her are speaking English, a language that she recognizes only for its incomprehensible sounds. When she speaks, her words are Vietnamese. Thu-Ha Le has been in Orange County's Little Saigon a week. She was born in Bien Hoa on the outskirts of that other Saigon, the one that no longer officially exists.
NEWS
June 30, 1991 | DIANNE KLEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Her mother sent her here, she says, fidgeting a little, breaking into a grin, not quite sure if happiness is called for or not. People around her are speaking in English, a language that she recognizes only for its incomprehensible sounds. When she speaks, her words are in Vietnamese. Thu-Ha Le has been in Little Saigon a week. She was born in Bien-hoa, on the outskirts of that other Saigon, the one that no longer officially exists. It was the Year of the Chicken, 22 years ago on Christmas Day.
NEWS
December 21, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
More than 30,000 people fled Vietnam in 1990 as "boat people," washing up as far away as the islands of Indonesia. Despite the huge size of the continuing exodus, the overall number of asylum-seekers was actually down compared to the previous two years. The decline in the number of refugees has many explanations: a virtual halt to asylum-seekers who are leaving Vietnam and a flood of propaganda about the hardships awaiting emigrants.
NEWS
July 28, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Bush Administration served notice Friday that it is willing to go along with a proposal to make it easier for Asian governments to return Indochinese "boat people" to their former homes in Vietnam and Cambodia. Secretary of State James A. Baker III announced that the United States, for the first time, will accept a plan under which Vietnamese or Cambodians who have fled from Indochina will be sent home whenever they "do not object" to repatriation. Appearing at a meeting of the Assn.
NEWS
June 16, 1990 | From United Press International
More than 8,500 Vietnamese "boat people" have been turned away from Malaysian shores despite a pledge by the country to offer the refugees asylum, international observers said Friday. The officials said they fear the practice of turning away the Vietnamese, called boat people because they flee Vietnam in boats, could spread the growing refugee problem to other parts of the Pacific.
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