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Vietnam Era Educational Center

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September 27, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The nation's first museum dedicated to the Vietnam War opens today, after a three-year struggle over radically different views of the conflict held by veterans and historians. A committee organizing the Vietnam Era Educational Center in Holmdel, N.J., spent most of the last year rewriting every word of the museum's text panels and arguing about the role of the media, the legitimacy of the antiwar movement and whether the effort could have been won.
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NEWS
September 29, 1998 | From Associated Press
In 1966, while a soldier in Vietnam, Teddy Pawlyshyn wrote a letter to himself. In it, he said, "We shouldn't be here." Years later, the memory of that letter has kept Pawlyshyn from feeling resentment toward the thousands who protested the war during the Vietnam era. At the opening Sunday of the nation's first museum dedicated to that time, Pawlyshyn said it was important to present both sides of the conflict for the benefit of future generations.
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NEWS
September 29, 1998 | From Associated Press
In 1966, while a soldier in Vietnam, Teddy Pawlyshyn wrote a letter to himself. In it, he said, "We shouldn't be here." Years later, the memory of that letter has kept Pawlyshyn from feeling resentment toward the thousands who protested the war during the Vietnam era. At the opening Sunday of the nation's first museum dedicated to that time, Pawlyshyn said it was important to present both sides of the conflict for the benefit of future generations.
NEWS
September 27, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The nation's first museum dedicated to the Vietnam War opens today, after a three-year struggle over radically different views of the conflict held by veterans and historians. A committee organizing the Vietnam Era Educational Center in Holmdel, N.J., spent most of the last year rewriting every word of the museum's text panels and arguing about the role of the media, the legitimacy of the antiwar movement and whether the effort could have been won.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 8, 1998 | AMY WESTFELDT, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Although she believes the country was wrong to fight in the Vietnam War, Barbara Hauke also believes those soldiers' efforts have been undervalued for years. "I really felt that this country really didn't do anything for these men," said Hauke, chairwoman of the nation's only museum dedicated to Vietnam. "It had to be done. The story had to be told." Some veterans say the story isn't being told right.
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