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October 5, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as a Ping-Pong match two decades ago provided the diplomatic pretext for improved relations between the United States and China, the Asian Games in Beijing appear to have set the seal on improved ties between China and Vietnam. Vietnam sent its aging hero of two wars against the French and Americans, Deputy Premier Vo Nguyen Giap, to attend the games, which end Sunday. He was the first Vietnamese leader to make an official visit to China in more than a decade.
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NEWS
February 23, 1991 | HARRY G. SUMMERS Jr.
If nothing else, the war in the Persian Gulf has certainly validated Karl von Clausewitz's famous dictum that "war is the continuation of political intercourse with the addition of other means." With the Soviet "peace proposal" and President Bush's ultimatum now on the table, it is the "political intercourse," not the war, that dominates the news. Chinese Communist forces during the Korean War were masters of what they called ta ta tan tan, translated as "fight, fight, talk, talk."
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NEWS
February 23, 1991 | HARRY G. SUMMERS Jr.
If nothing else, the war in the Persian Gulf has certainly validated Karl von Clausewitz's famous dictum that "war is the continuation of political intercourse with the addition of other means." With the Soviet "peace proposal" and President Bush's ultimatum now on the table, it is the "political intercourse," not the war, that dominates the news. Chinese Communist forces during the Korean War were masters of what they called ta ta tan tan, translated as "fight, fight, talk, talk."
NEWS
October 5, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Just as a Ping-Pong match two decades ago provided the diplomatic pretext for improved relations between the United States and China, the Asian Games in Beijing appear to have set the seal on improved ties between China and Vietnam. Vietnam sent its aging hero of two wars against the French and Americans, Deputy Premier Vo Nguyen Giap, to attend the games, which end Sunday. He was the first Vietnamese leader to make an official visit to China in more than a decade.
NEWS
September 24, 1992 | Reuters
Vietnam's National Assembly chose conservative Gen. Le Duc Anh as president Wednesday in what observers said underlines the Communist Party's determination to keep a firm grip on economic reforms. The 72-year-old Anh, Vietnam's top general, was the only candidate and received all of the secret ballots cast by the 392-seat Assembly, the state-run Voice of Vietnam radio said.
OPINION
June 22, 1986 | Tom Hayden, Assemblyman Tom Hayden (D-Santa Monica) spoke recently at a symposium on the Johnson years at Hofstra University; this article is adapted from those remarks.
The Lyndon Baines Johnson Library and Museum in Austin, Texas, sits by a grassy hill where, amid a constant stream of lighthearted students, one can reflect on the past. The library itself is a virtually windowless brown stone building that reminds me of a vast tomb. Just past the entrance, one finds the foreign-affairs exhibit, where the visitor first learns that the Johnson years, 1963-69, were "crowded with events--dramatic, tragic, hopeful--which related to foreign affairs."
NATIONAL
June 17, 2004 | Ronald Brownstein, Times Staff Writer
The call for President Bush's defeat in a statement released Wednesday by a group of former diplomats and military officials highlighted the stark divide that has opened among foreign policy experts over the administration's national security strategy.
OPINION
September 26, 1999 | William Schneider, William Schneider, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a political analyst for CNN
Remember foreign policy? It used to be the supreme, life-and-death issue. Foreign policy, not the economy, dominated most presidential elections from the 1940s through the 1980s. It was a serious matter involving dire threats to U.S. national security--first fascism, then communism. So serious that a bipartisan consensus prevailed on foreign policy from World War II to Vietnam. Foreign policy was literally above politics. And now? Foreign policy is back. But it ain't what it used to be.
NEWS
July 22, 1996 | JIM MANN
Is Vietnam once again miscalculating in its dealings with the United States? This month marks the first anniversary of President Clinton's decision to establish relations with Hanoi, and the rulers of Vietnam are irked and perplexed. They had hoped that the new ties would bring new economic benefits--especially the most-favored-nation trade benefits that would give their exports regular low-tariff access to the American market. It hasn't happened.
NEWS
December 12, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Nearly 20 years ago, Chinese troops swept across the border here and at other points by the hundreds of thousands to punish Vietnam for its growing ties with the Soviet Union and its invasion of China-backed Cambodia. Vietnam's resistance was fierce, and the poorly trained Chinese soldiers got no farther than 20 miles into Vietnamese territory. After 17 days of fighting that left 20,000 dead, China declared victory and went home.
NEWS
April 23, 1994 | DAN WEIKEL and LEN HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Richard Milhous Nixon was born in a modest Yorba Linda farmhouse during a record cold snap. He played violin for the Fullerton High School orchestra in the 1920s and proposed to Thelma (Pat) Ryan in Dana Point as they watched the sun set from the front seat of an Oldsmobile. His 1950 U.S. Senate campaign swept through Orange County, and he delivered a speech branding his Democrat opponent a Communist sympathizer. It was pure Nixon, and the audience was receptive.
NEWS
April 28, 1985 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
It was April 29, 1975--perhaps the most humiliating day in American history--when the last handful of U.S. diplomats clambered out onto the roof of the U.S. Embassy in Saigon and fled aboard waiting helicopters. Marine guards used rifle butts to beat aside Vietnamese who clutched in panic at the departing aircraft.
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