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NEWS
December 31, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a recent surge in the number of reported infections with the virus that causes AIDS, the government here is drawing up plans to help control the disease, including a campaign--still revolutionary in this prudish Communist state--to promote safe sex. The draft drawn up by Vietnam's National AIDS Committee warned that, if current trends continue, as many as 500,000 adult Vietnamese could be infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in five years.
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NEWS
January 25, 1994 | HARRY NELSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES: Nelson, a former Times medical writer, was one of three U.S. journalists in Vietnam recently on a UNICEF-sponsored fact-finding tour
Vietnam's efforts to open up the country to foreign trade may well improve its flagging economy, but health experts fear that the pace of the free-market reforms is threatening gains made in recent decades in improving the health of the Vietnamese. Already international health agencies like the United Nations Children's Fund are reporting a drop in the use of health centers as services get worse and facilities deteriorate. Rural areas, where 85% of the country's 71.
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NEWS
September 7, 1987 | United Press International
The United States expects Vietnam to help locate more than 2,400 military personnel still missing from the Vietnam War because of a recent agreement to encourage organizations to provide medical relief there, a published report said Sunday. Last week, two doctors specializing in artificial limbs and the director of an international charitable organization accompanied a U.S. delegation to Hanoi for talks, the New York Times reported.
NEWS
December 31, 1993 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a recent surge in the number of reported infections with the virus that causes AIDS, the government here is drawing up plans to help control the disease, including a campaign--still revolutionary in this prudish Communist state--to promote safe sex. The draft drawn up by Vietnam's National AIDS Committee warned that, if current trends continue, as many as 500,000 adult Vietnamese could be infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in five years.
NEWS
January 25, 1994 | HARRY NELSON, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES: Nelson, a former Times medical writer, was one of three U.S. journalists in Vietnam recently on a UNICEF-sponsored fact-finding tour
Vietnam's efforts to open up the country to foreign trade may well improve its flagging economy, but health experts fear that the pace of the free-market reforms is threatening gains made in recent decades in improving the health of the Vietnamese. Already international health agencies like the United Nations Children's Fund are reporting a drop in the use of health centers as services get worse and facilities deteriorate. Rural areas, where 85% of the country's 71.
WORLD
March 27, 2005 | From Times Wire Reports
Vietnam ordered health authorities to launch a nationwide campaign to clean up poultry farms in a bid to control the spread of bird flu as the number of human cases continued to grow, state media reported. The Ministry of Health issued instructions that all poultry farms in the country, from large-scale commercial operations to backyard farms, would be disinfected beginning Friday, the Laborer newspaper reported.
MAGAZINE
December 15, 1991 | DIANA SHAW, Diana Shaw is a writer, and a researcher for the movie industry.
One night last spring I lay sleepless and sweltering in the dying city of Haiphong, North Viet Nam, asking myself the question that has taunted so many young Americans caught in faraway places: "What in the hell am I doing here?" . . . Out there, in the makeshift refugee camp I had set up with U.S. Army tents, were more than 12,000 wretched, sick and horribly maimed Vietnamese, most of them either very young or very old.
WORLD
January 23, 2004 | From Times Wire Services
Government officials today confirmed Thailand's first two human cases of bird flu and an outbreak among chickens in central Suphan Buri province. The announcements followed days of official denials that the country had any cases of the disease, which has killed five people in Vietnam. Health Minister Sudarat Keyuraphan said tests on two patients were positive and one was negative. The patients were reportedly in Suphan Buri and Kanchanaburi provinces.
SCIENCE
February 3, 2005 | Charles Piller, Times Staff Writer
Vietnamese authorities Wednesday ordered the slaughter or culling of all domesticated ducks in Ho Chi Minh City to stem surging bird flu outbreaks that have killed 13 people since late December. Vietnam's Health Ministry on Tuesday had confirmed that a Cambodian woman who died Sunday had bird flu, marking the first confirmed Cambodian death from the disease and indicating its possible spread. All the other fatalities since December have been Vietnamese nationals.
NEWS
November 12, 1988 | LAURIE DUNCAN, Times Staff Writer
The American Legion, criticizing the federal government for its sluggish pace in handling Vietnam veterans' health problems, released a study Friday that shows an "alarming" trend of physical and emotional problems among soldiers who were involved in heavy combat. According to the study, "combat intensity significantly relates to a history of high blood pressure, ulcers, arthritis, rheumatism, kidney problems and more," Dr. Steven Stellman said at a press conference.
NEWS
September 7, 1987 | United Press International
The United States expects Vietnam to help locate more than 2,400 military personnel still missing from the Vietnam War because of a recent agreement to encourage organizations to provide medical relief there, a published report said Sunday. Last week, two doctors specializing in artificial limbs and the director of an international charitable organization accompanied a U.S. delegation to Hanoi for talks, the New York Times reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2008 | My-Thuan Tran, Times Staff Writer
Thirty-three years after the Vietnam War ended, the fallen country of South Vietnam lives on -- in the streets of Orange County's Little Saigon and in the minds of thousands of refugees who fled communist forces and rebuilt their lives here. The memories of hardship are still so bitter for some that they continue to mount street protests, fly the South Vietnamese flag from businesses and lampposts, and rail against communism on radio talk shows.
WORLD
January 25, 2004 | Richard C. Paddock, Times Staff Writer
Health officials said Saturday that the death of a boy from bird flu in Ho Chi Minh City was the first in southern Vietnam and expressed alarm that the outbreak had spread through much of Southeast Asia. Five Vietnamese previously died of the disease, but all had fallen ill far to the north, outside Hanoi.
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