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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2013 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stanley Karnow, an award-winning author and journalist who combined insightful reporting with personal accounts and historical sweep in books on the Vietnam War and the Philippines and the critically acclaimed public television series that accompanied the works, died Sunday at his home in Potomac, Md. He was 87. Karnow had congestive heart failure and died in his sleep, said son Michael Karnow. A former correspondent for Time, the Washington Post and other publications, Karnow was one of the first U.S. journalists to report from Vietnam in the late 1950s, when American involvement in South Vietnam was still confined to a small group of advisors.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2013 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stanley Karnow, an award-winning author and journalist who combined insightful reporting with personal accounts and historical sweep in books on the Vietnam War and the Philippines and the critically acclaimed public television series that accompanied the works, died Sunday at his home in Potomac, Md. He was 87. Karnow had congestive heart failure and died in his sleep, said son Michael Karnow. A former correspondent for Time, the Washington Post and other publications, Karnow was one of the first U.S. journalists to report from Vietnam in the late 1950s, when American involvement in South Vietnam was still confined to a small group of advisors.
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SCIENCE
November 15, 2003 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Workers clearing the site of a proposed new National Assembly building in Hanoi have stumbled across a massive treasure-trove of antiquities and the remains of structures from four Vietnamese dynasties dating to the 6th century. "It is a surprising and priceless discovery," Phan Huy Le, chairman of the Vietnam History Assn., told Agence France-Presse.
SCIENCE
November 15, 2003 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Workers clearing the site of a proposed new National Assembly building in Hanoi have stumbled across a massive treasure-trove of antiquities and the remains of structures from four Vietnamese dynasties dating to the 6th century. "It is a surprising and priceless discovery," Phan Huy Le, chairman of the Vietnam History Assn., told Agence France-Presse.
NEWS
January 30, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty years ago Saturday, Communist forces launched a predawn attack that would change the course of the Vietnam War. The magnitude of the Tet Offensive reached a stunned U.S. officialdom with five simple words: "Sir," said the Marine guard who awoke Ambassador Ellsworth Bunker at 3 a.m., "Saigon is under attack." From the DMZ to the Mekong Delta, hell broke loose on the Lunar New Year, with heavy fighting engulfing 100 of South Vietnam's provincial and district capitals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 1990 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Born in a refugee's basement, a desktop publishing operation here has become the largest purveyor of Vietnamese-language books outside Vietnam. Using two rickety presses and low-tech collating and book-binding machines, the Xuan Thu press has since 1976 been churning out everything from ancient Vietnamese classics to modern kung fu novels--the memoirs of generals and postwar prisoners, epic romances and English textbooks, cookbooks, dictionaries and children's books.
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ho Chi Minh Trail, which carried a million North Vietnamese soldiers south and confounded the United States' top military strategists for a decade, belongs to history now, its network of hidden dirt roads reclaimed by jungle, leeches and ghosts of a war long past. But though abandoned, there is hardly anything or anyone, save Ho Chi Minh himself, that the Vietnamese of the north hold more dear than the supply route that was once the world's deadliest road.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 3, 1991 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behind a thin veil of smoke rising from an incense pot, the portrait of a man in a turban and traditional silk Vietnamese tunic stared out at more than 1,000 Vietnamese attendants at St. Barbara's Roman Catholic Church on Saturday. At 1 p.m.
NEWS
April 30, 1990 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Saigon radio went dead at 10 a.m. on April 30, 1975. From the air traffic control tower at Can Tho, the only airport then still functioning in South Vietnam, Liem Huu Nguyen looked down and saw soldiers shooting each other for a seat on the last helicopters. Twenty minutes later, South Vietnamese President Duong Van Minh announced unconditional surrender. "I felt, I'm glad it's over," said Nguyen, then 18, now a Northern California attorney. "The killing has been going on for so long. . . .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2001 | THUY-DOAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With patriotic Vietnamese songs blaring from speakers at the Cultural Court in Little Saigon, hundreds gathered waving flags Sunday to mark the 26th anniversary of the fall of South Vietnam. Political and religious leaders took the podium to remember the April 30 surrender of the Saigon Government in 1975 and to call for religious freedom and basic human rights. In Vietnam last year, said Rep.
NEWS
April 6, 2003 | Max Boot, Max Boot is Olin senior fellow at the Council on Foreign Relations and author of "The Savage Wars of Peace: Small Wars and the Rise of American Power."
The defeat of the Taliban should have shattered for all time the mystique of the guerrilla. But apparently it did not. The whole world is in an uproar over the vicious hit-and-run tactics employed by Saddam Hussein's thugs to resist coalition forces. Instead of being taken as a sign of weakness, the scattershot attacks of guerrilla fighters have been inexplicably seen as evidence of the regime's strength.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2001 | THUY-DOAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With patriotic Vietnamese songs blaring from speakers at the Cultural Court in Little Saigon, hundreds gathered waving flags Sunday to mark the 26th anniversary of the fall of South Vietnam. Political and religious leaders took the podium to remember the April 30 surrender of the Saigon Government in 1975 and to call for religious freedom and basic human rights. In Vietnam last year, said Rep.
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Ho Chi Minh Trail, which carried a million North Vietnamese soldiers south and confounded the United States' top military strategists for a decade, belongs to history now, its network of hidden dirt roads reclaimed by jungle, leeches and ghosts of a war long past. But though abandoned, there is hardly anything or anyone, save Ho Chi Minh himself, that the Vietnamese of the north hold more dear than the supply route that was once the world's deadliest road.
NEWS
April 11, 2000
PROLOGUE Why did the United States get involved in war in Vietnam? Even 25 years after its end, the answer remains elusive. Perhaps the relative success of the war in Korea had something to do with it. U.S. troops did prevent North Korea from taking over the whole Korean peninsula after its invasion of South Korea in June 1950. How difficult could it be to "save" South Vietnam? Perhaps it stemmed as well from Cold War anxiety.
NEWS
July 24, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old lady waited, as she had waited so often during her 93 years, for her sons. She fidgeted, smoothing the pleats of her purple dress, and peered out from her home, out into the rain, out into the bamboo thickets. Maybe she had the wrong day, she fretted. Maybe the family reunion wasn't today. Or maybe it was the rain. How could anyone come in such weather?
NEWS
January 30, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-one years ago, when Khe Sanh was part of the world's vocabulary, one of the defining moments of the Vietnam War was being played out in this mist-shrouded valley near the Laotian border.
NEWS
July 24, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The old lady waited, as she had waited so often during her 93 years, for her sons. She fidgeted, smoothing the pleats of her purple dress, and peered out from her home, out into the rain, out into the bamboo thickets. Maybe she had the wrong day, she fretted. Maybe the family reunion wasn't today. Or maybe it was the rain. How could anyone come in such weather?
NEWS
January 30, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty-one years ago, when Khe Sanh was part of the world's vocabulary, one of the defining moments of the Vietnam War was being played out in this mist-shrouded valley near the Laotian border.
NEWS
January 30, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thirty years ago Saturday, Communist forces launched a predawn attack that would change the course of the Vietnam War. The magnitude of the Tet Offensive reached a stunned U.S. officialdom with five simple words: "Sir," said the Marine guard who awoke Ambassador Ellsworth Bunker at 3 a.m., "Saigon is under attack." From the DMZ to the Mekong Delta, hell broke loose on the Lunar New Year, with heavy fighting engulfing 100 of South Vietnam's provincial and district capitals.
NEWS
March 28, 1993 | GEORGE ESPER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Max Beilke is not known for any heroics during his tour of Vietnam--for capturing a hill, or routing the Viet Cong, or winning a battle in that war that still burdens the American psyche. Beilke's accomplishment: He left. He was, in fact, officially designated by the Army to be the last American soldier to leave Vietnam. On March 29, 1973, he stamped his own orders and flew out, leaving the stamp on the table.
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