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BUSINESS
January 11, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hanoi Discusses Privatization: Communist Vietnam has begun talks with the World Bank on a program that includes privatizing state-owned enterprises, Finance Minister Ho Te said. The United States has blocked lending from the bank and the International Monetary Fund as part of its economic embargo against Vietnam. Political analysts say President Bush may announce a change in policy before his term ends on Jan. 20 in response to Hanoi's increased cooperation in resolving the fate of U.S.
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NEWS
June 6, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southeast Asia is turning its back on the trusty vehicle that moved the region into modern times--the bicycle. Bikes have all but vanished from the car-clogged streets of Bangkok, Manila and Jakarta, and they are disappearing fast from other capitals as well. The only real urban refuge left for bike commuters in Southeast Asia is Vietnam, where the nation's 30 million bicycles outnumber motor scooters 6 to 1 and cars 60 to 1.
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BUSINESS
December 18, 1997 | PATRICE APODACA and DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The possibility of Vietnam becoming a full trading partner with the United States comes as good news to Southern California, particularly Orange County, home of the largest concentration of Vietnamese immigrants in the world. Businesses owned by Vietnamese Americans will be among the first to benefit, observers say, because of their ties to the homeland. Other local companies stand to gain as well, including engineering and construction services providers, such as Irvine-based Fluor Corp.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1997 | PATRICE APODACA and DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The possibility of Vietnam becoming a full trading partner with the United States comes as good news to Southern California, particularly Orange County, home of the largest concentration of Vietnamese immigrants in the world. Businesses owned by Vietnamese Americans will be among the first to benefit, observers say, because of their ties to the homeland. Other local companies stand to gain as well, including engineering and construction services providers, such as Irvine-based Fluor Corp.
NEWS
June 10, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trinh Ngoc Bao has an enormous headache. As deputy director of Hanoi's Chien Thang Sewing Factory, Bao has been struggling to keep the state-owned firm afloat under economic reforms requiring that he turn a profit or go bankrupt. Bao has slowly built up a small clientele in Sweden, South Korea and Japan that pays in hard currency. Last year, he built a new executive office complex with the profits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1987
Vietnam's forests will vanish by the year 2000 at the current rate of exploitation, and pollution has already reached "the danger point," according to the Vietnam News Agency, which suggested that rising industrial pollution, soil erosion and destruction of wildlife is creating a grim environmental picture. Forest cover had shrunk from 43.8% of the country in 1945 to 23.6% in 1984, when 19.3 million acres of forest remained, the agency said.
NEWS
September 26, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After several years of heady growth and enthusiastic support from international investors and donors, Vietnam finds itself facing a sobering reality: Those forecasts that it would soon join the elite fraternity of Asian nations known as economic "tigers" were wildly premature.
NEWS
August 27, 1995 | From Associated Press
Coca-Cola Co. inaugurated its first bottling plant in northern Vietnam on Saturday, the first American factory to open in Vietnam since the United States restored diplomatic relations Aug. 6. Costumed drummers paraded through the $24-million facility as Cokes sped along a computerized bottling line. The plant, 10 miles south of Hanoi, can bottle 136 million gallons of Coke a year. Coca-Cola plans to introduce a canning line later this year.
NEWS
June 6, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southeast Asia is turning its back on the trusty vehicle that moved the region into modern times--the bicycle. Bikes have all but vanished from the car-clogged streets of Bangkok, Manila and Jakarta, and they are disappearing fast from other capitals as well. The only real urban refuge left for bike commuters in Southeast Asia is Vietnam, where the nation's 30 million bicycles outnumber motor scooters 6 to 1 and cars 60 to 1.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1995 | From Associated Press
Lured by Vietnam's robust economic growth, the world's biggest auto makers are racing to assemble vehicles in what they hope will become Asia's next booming car market. Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler Corp. of the United States, Japan's Toyota Motor Corp. and France's PSA Peugeot Citroen are among the companies investing or applying to invest a total of more than $650 million in assembly plants. Japan's Daihatsu Motor Co. and Suzuki Motor Corp.
NEWS
September 26, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After several years of heady growth and enthusiastic support from international investors and donors, Vietnam finds itself facing a sobering reality: Those forecasts that it would soon join the elite fraternity of Asian nations known as economic "tigers" were wildly premature.
NEWS
August 27, 1995 | From Associated Press
Coca-Cola Co. inaugurated its first bottling plant in northern Vietnam on Saturday, the first American factory to open in Vietnam since the United States restored diplomatic relations Aug. 6. Costumed drummers paraded through the $24-million facility as Cokes sped along a computerized bottling line. The plant, 10 miles south of Hanoi, can bottle 136 million gallons of Coke a year. Coca-Cola plans to introduce a canning line later this year.
BUSINESS
July 3, 1995 | From Associated Press
Lured by Vietnam's robust economic growth, the world's biggest auto makers are racing to assemble vehicles in what they hope will become Asia's next booming car market. Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler Corp. of the United States, Japan's Toyota Motor Corp. and France's PSA Peugeot Citroen are among the companies investing or applying to invest a total of more than $650 million in assembly plants. Japan's Daihatsu Motor Co. and Suzuki Motor Corp.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1995 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vietnam's economic progress can be measured by the usual dry economic statistics. Or it can be measured as it is by Canadian economist Geoffrey Hainsworth--by what causes the trauma that enters the emergency room at Hanoi's biggest hospital. When Hainsworth first visited Vietnam in 1989, the emergency ward was filled with pedestrians run down by bicyclists. A couple of years later, the casualties were bicyclists struck by motorcyclists. Then it was motorcyclists colliding with taxis.
BUSINESS
December 19, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Some Foreign Investments Restricted: The rules are aimed at protecting domestic producers in two of Vietnam's fastest-growing economic sectors--hotels, and garments and shoes--said Ngo Van Diem, a director of the State Committee for Cooperation and Investment. Foreign joint ventures making garments and shoes must now export at least 80% of their production. Firms in those industries owned completely by foreigners must export 90% of their goods, Ngo said.
NEWS
June 10, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trinh Ngoc Bao has an enormous headache. As deputy director of Hanoi's Chien Thang Sewing Factory, Bao has been struggling to keep the state-owned firm afloat under economic reforms requiring that he turn a profit or go bankrupt. Bao has slowly built up a small clientele in Sweden, South Korea and Japan that pays in hard currency. Last year, he built a new executive office complex with the profits.
BUSINESS
April 30, 1995 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vietnam's economic progress can be measured by the usual dry economic statistics. Or it can be measured as it is by Canadian economist Geoffrey Hainsworth--by what causes the trauma that enters the emergency room at Hanoi's biggest hospital. When Hainsworth first visited Vietnam in 1989, the emergency ward was filled with pedestrians run down by bicyclists. A couple of years later, the casualties were bicyclists struck by motorcyclists. Then it was motorcyclists colliding with taxis.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1987
Vietnam's forests will vanish by the year 2000 at the current rate of exploitation, and pollution has already reached "the danger point," according to the Vietnam News Agency, which suggested that rising industrial pollution, soil erosion and destruction of wildlife is creating a grim environmental picture. Forest cover had shrunk from 43.8% of the country in 1945 to 23.6% in 1984, when 19.3 million acres of forest remained, the agency said.
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