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NEWS
March 25, 1998 | JIM MANN
The Clinton administration showed a few days ago that it is faster and has shiftier moves than Michael Jordan. Jordan, the world's most famous basketball player, has said that he will travel to Asia this summer to see firsthand how workers are treated at Nike factories in Vietnam and other countries. He decided to make this trip after seeing a flurry of reports about substandard working conditions in these countries. But last week, the U.S. government beat him to the punch.
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NEWS
October 22, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In most countries, workers would have cheered the news that the Vietnamese received the other day: The workweek was being cut to 40 hours, with Saturdays off. But the government's announcement reducing the workweek by eight hours brought mostly grumbling in this industrious country where leisure time is all but unknown and people think nothing of laboring seven days a week, month after month.
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NEWS
July 9, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
"Here in the south, we are a migrant people, like the Americans," reflected Ly Chanh Trung, a thoughtful, three-term national assemblyman of Vietnam, a troubled country that is still divided in many ways. "The south looks to the future," the slender, one-time professor of ethics continued. "We rely on ourselves. Hanoi likes to look back."
NEWS
February 3, 1999 | JIM MANN
Not long ago, Vietnamese officials approached Pete Peterson, the U.S. ambassador in Hanoi, with an unusual overture: Might the United States be interested in importing a bunch of Vietnamese laborers to work under contract? Vietnam has been exporting many thousands of its workers, mostly to neighbors such as Japan and South Korea. Officials in Ho Chi Minh City, the former Saigon, recently boasted that they had cut that city's unemployment rate to 6% last year.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1995 | From Reuters
Communist Vietnam needs to keep its rural workers down on the farm to tackle a severe unemployment problem as it moves rapidly toward a market economy, international experts say. Stabilizing unemployment at its current level of 6% requires an economic growth rate of more than 10%, the International Labor Organization said in a report released last week. Vietnam recorded growth of 8.8% in gross domestic product last year.
NEWS
June 10, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trinh Ngoc Bao has an enormous headache. As deputy director of Hanoi's Chien Thang Sewing Factory, Bao has been struggling to keep the state-owned firm afloat under economic reforms requiring that he turn a profit or go bankrupt. Bao has slowly built up a small clientele in Sweden, South Korea and Japan that pays in hard currency. Last year, he built a new executive office complex with the profits.
NEWS
February 3, 1999 | JIM MANN
Not long ago, Vietnamese officials approached Pete Peterson, the U.S. ambassador in Hanoi, with an unusual overture: Might the United States be interested in importing a bunch of Vietnamese laborers to work under contract? Vietnam has been exporting many thousands of its workers, mostly to neighbors such as Japan and South Korea. Officials in Ho Chi Minh City, the former Saigon, recently boasted that they had cut that city's unemployment rate to 6% last year.
NEWS
October 22, 1999 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In most countries, workers would have cheered the news that the Vietnamese received the other day: The workweek was being cut to 40 hours, with Saturdays off. But the government's announcement reducing the workweek by eight hours brought mostly grumbling in this industrious country where leisure time is all but unknown and people think nothing of laboring seven days a week, month after month.
BUSINESS
March 28, 1997 | Associated Press
Teen-age girls paid 20 cents an hour to make $180 Nike sneakers are worked to exhaustion and fondled by their supervisors at Vietnam factories, a labor activist said. "Supervisors humiliate women, force them to kneel, to stand in the hot sun, treating them like recruits in boot camp," said Thuyen Nguyen, founder of Vietnam Labor Watch. Beaverton, Ore.-based Nike Inc. said it suspended one plant manager for forcing women to run laps.
NEWS
March 25, 1998 | JIM MANN
The Clinton administration showed a few days ago that it is faster and has shiftier moves than Michael Jordan. Jordan, the world's most famous basketball player, has said that he will travel to Asia this summer to see firsthand how workers are treated at Nike factories in Vietnam and other countries. He decided to make this trip after seeing a flurry of reports about substandard working conditions in these countries. But last week, the U.S. government beat him to the punch.
BUSINESS
May 15, 1995 | From Reuters
Communist Vietnam needs to keep its rural workers down on the farm to tackle a severe unemployment problem as it moves rapidly toward a market economy, international experts say. Stabilizing unemployment at its current level of 6% requires an economic growth rate of more than 10%, the International Labor Organization said in a report released last week. Vietnam recorded growth of 8.8% in gross domestic product last year.
NEWS
June 10, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Trinh Ngoc Bao has an enormous headache. As deputy director of Hanoi's Chien Thang Sewing Factory, Bao has been struggling to keep the state-owned firm afloat under economic reforms requiring that he turn a profit or go bankrupt. Bao has slowly built up a small clientele in Sweden, South Korea and Japan that pays in hard currency. Last year, he built a new executive office complex with the profits.
NEWS
July 9, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
"Here in the south, we are a migrant people, like the Americans," reflected Ly Chanh Trung, a thoughtful, three-term national assemblyman of Vietnam, a troubled country that is still divided in many ways. "The south looks to the future," the slender, one-time professor of ethics continued. "We rely on ourselves. Hanoi likes to look back."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 1998
Re "Shifty Move on Labor Rights in Vietnam," International Outlook, March 25: Nothing better illustrates Times writer Jim Mann's point about Washington's hypocrisy in dealing with labor abroad than the juxtaposition of his story with the front-page article that day on President Clinton's trip to Africa. While Clinton was in Uganda awkwardly apologizing for America's slave trade practices of the previous centuries, his administration, through the Overseas Private Investment Corp., is rubber-stamping Vietnam's current substandard, coercive labor practices for the benefit of the big business lobby and corporations like Nike.
BUSINESS
April 6, 1992 | GEORGE WHITE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Anticipating that the U.S. government will eventually lift a ban on commercial activity with Vietnam, United Airlines is trying to lay the groundwork to establish flight service to that Southeast Asian nation. United Chairman Stephen M. Wolf met last week met with top aviation officials in Hanoi to convey his company's interest in establishing commercial service to Vietnam after a lifting of the U.S. government embargo on dealings with that country.
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