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March 22, 1988 | Associated Press
An old generation is remembering the Vietnam war and a new generation is curious, stirring a revival of the controversial era in books and movies. Now comes a new publication, a slick magazine simply named Vietnam, whose first issue goes on sale today. "Our timing could not have been better because right now, look at all the Vietnam movies that have come out," said publisher Gregg R. Oehler in a telephone interview from Leesburg, Va., where the magazine is published by Empire Press.
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October 30, 1988 | HUGH A. MULLIGAN, Associated Press
As its circulation nears 250,000 after only three issues, Vietnam magazine is receiving poems from Boat People and letters from kids wanting to know more about the war Dad at last is beginning to talk about. "I wouldn't be surprised if we started hearing from old Viet Cong cadre telling how they got ready for Tet," says Harry Summers, a retired Army colonel and twice-wounded Vietnam veteran who edits the magazine.
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NEWS
October 30, 1988 | HUGH A. MULLIGAN, Associated Press
As its circulation nears 250,000 after only three issues, Vietnam magazine is receiving poems from Boat People and letters from kids wanting to know more about the war Dad at last is beginning to talk about. "I wouldn't be surprised if we started hearing from old Viet Cong cadre telling how they got ready for Tet," says Harry Summers, a retired Army colonel and twice-wounded Vietnam veteran who edits the magazine.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1988 | Associated Press
An old generation is remembering the Vietnam war and a new generation is curious, stirring a revival of the controversial era in books and movies. Now comes a new publication, a slick magazine simply named Vietnam, whose first issue goes on sale today. "Our timing could not have been better because right now, look at all the Vietnam movies that have come out," said publisher Gregg R. Oehler in a telephone interview from Leesburg, Va., where the magazine is published by Empire Press.
NEWS
September 15, 1994 | KENTON ROBINSON, THE HARTFORD COURANT
On a sunny Sunday afternoon 30 years ago, three torpedo boats attacked the U.S. destroyer Maddox off the coast of North Vietnam. The Maddox, which had entered the Gulf of Tonkin to spy on the North Vietnamese, escaped unscathed. But the skirmish--and a second spurious incident reported two days later--gave President Lyndon B. Johnson all the excuse he needed to lead the United States into its most unpopular war.
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November 18, 1999 | JON THURBER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Col. Harry G. Summers Jr., a career soldier who was a respected student of U.S. involvement in Vietnam and a highly visible television analyst during the Gulf War, has died. Summers, the author of numerous books and a military affairs columnist for the Los Angeles Times Syndicate, died Sunday at Walter Reed Army Hospital in Washington. He had been battling diabetes, heart disease and the effects of stroke, and a leg recently was amputated. He was 67.
NEWS
February 22, 1991 | HARRY G. SUMMERS Jr.
The one phrase not heard during the present crisis in the Persian Gulf is "national command authority." For the first time in many years, the military has a commander in chief and, as unlikely as it might have seemed only a year ago, it is George Herbert Walker Bush. From "the wimp in the White House," he has turned into one of the strongest war Presidents since Franklin D. Roosevelt. And that's particularly good news.
NEWS
March 2, 1991 | HARRY G. SUMMERS Jr.
"The Vietnam syndrome is over!" So proclaimed President Bush on Friday. He didn't need to tell Iraqi dictator Saddam Hussein, who had tried to fight that war all over again. And in a strange way, the Gulf War ended almost exactly as the Vietnam War did, just as Hussein claimed it would. But to his surprise, instead of playing the role of North Vietnam's Ho Chi Minh, as he intended, he found himself playing the role of South Vietnam's Nguyen Van Thieu. In October, 1972, U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 2005 | Steve Chawkins, Times Staff Writer
Last month, yet another flag-draped metal box was ceremoniously borne through the back doors of the Central Identification Laboratory by four solemn soldiers. Since then, scientists have given the new arrival their customary attention -- a kind of intense scrutiny seldom given to the living. They have weighed and measured and X-rayed the mummified remains of the man who was found Oct. 16 in a glacier in the Sierra Nevada.
NEWS
November 24, 1985 | DENIS D. GRAY, Associated Press
When dusk obscures the peeling paint and louvered windows shut behind seedy, crowded rooms, Hanoi becomes a place of surface magic, a charming French city from a vanished era whisked into the last decades of the 20th Century. Under Hanoi's dim street lights--there are no bright ones--it would hardly be surprising to pass a colonial gentleman decked out in white linen or to hear Edith Piaf singing melancholy ballads about the French Foreign Legion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1996 | DEBORAH BAKER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Bill Mauldin was close to euphoric. Not at the prospect of telling a visitor his life story, or of showing off the Pulitzer Prizes on the breakfast room wall. And not at the opportunity to autograph books for the appliance repairman who showed up at the front door at his home here with three copies of Mauldin's classic World War II cartoons. Nope, it was the impending delivery of an automobile engine that had Mauldin in high spirits.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 28, 2001 | ERIKA HAYASAKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Conservative columnist David Horowitz is at it again. After placing provocative advertisements in college newspapers earlier this year that denounced reparations for slavery, he once again is rankling students in ads that call antiwar demonstrations an "attack" on this country akin to treason. Fifteen college newspapers nationally, including the UCLA Daily Bruin and the Daily Californian at UC Berkeley, approved running the ads, said Stephen Brooks, who is coordinating the campaign for Horowitz.
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