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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1993
Thu-Huong Nguyen-Vo, author of "Khmer-Viet Relations and the Third Indochina Conflict," will be interviewed on the air at 6 p.m. today by KUCI, the student radio station at UC Irvine. The radio interview will focus on current issues in Vietnam. Nguyen-Vo is a second-year doctoral student in political science at UCI. Her research focuses on political order in former socialist countries.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2000 | MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of Vietnamese groups trying to raise funds for their flood-ravaged homeland are changing the way they seek donations because the local community has grown increasingly wary about such pitches. They are giving badges and passwords to volunteers who take coded donation boxes to Vietnamese businesses, escorted by other volunteers who videotape the transactions.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2000 | MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of Vietnamese groups trying to raise funds for their flood-ravaged homeland are changing the way they seek donations because the local community has grown increasingly wary about such pitches. They are giving badges and passwords to volunteers who take coded donation boxes to Vietnamese businesses, escorted by other volunteers who videotape the transactions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 1999 | PETER M. WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Offering Vietnamese emigres a primer on influencing foreign policy, Rep. Loretta Sanchez (D-Garden Grove) Sunday advocated lobbying Congress to win human rights concessions from Vietnam. The campaign has a new opportunity because Congress must approve the trade pact the Clinton administration is negotiating with the Southeast Asian nation. "The place where you can have an impact on human rights is in Congress.
NEWS
May 17, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the last congress of the Communist Party was held in 1986, Vietnam was on the verge of collapse. In desperation, the congress plunged into a series of sweeping economic reforms that make the Soviet Union's campaign of renovation seem tame by comparison. Now it is Vietnam's turn to steer a conservative course.
BUSINESS
August 19, 1991 | Sharon Bernstein, Free-lance journalist
The National Assembly of Vietnam recently elected its first reform-minded prime minister, Vo Van Kiet, under the unified Communist government. An old-line Communist leader who began to favor reform while mayor of Ho Chi Minh City, the 69-year-old faces the challenge of bringing market reforms to a nation with a centrally planned, state-directed economy. The nation, where 85% of the people are agrarian and the average annual income is about $200, suffers from a number of economic ills.
NEWS
February 21, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A Soviet documentary about Vietnam that was aired recently on Hanoi television recounted the economic and political reforms enacted in the country under the title "Vietnamese Surprise." The program caused hilarity among officials here because it was shown while Soviet President Mikhail S. Gorbachev was grappling with ending the leading role of the Communist Party of the Soviet Union. "Perhaps it should have been called 'The Russians Are Astonished,' " one official quipped.
NEWS
April 3, 1992 | PATRICK MOTT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The building in the city that once crumbled under a rain of artillery is clean, trim and inviting, not unlike a resort hotel, and the young Vietnamese people who live there are much the same. But they are not quite Vietnamese, and they don't want to stay. They long to be American, but they are not quite American. They are hopeful, but they are also bewildered, dispossessed, lost in a world of hazy culture and ethnicity between Orient and Occident.
NEWS
March 30, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a realignment of power that appears to run counter to the liberalizing trend under way in Eastern Europe, Vietnam's leadership has removed an outspoken reformer from the Communist Party Politburo and other top posts. The ouster of Tran Xuan Bach, which was announced Wednesday night in Hanoi, left students of Vietnamese politics puzzled about what the move portends for the reform movement in Vietnam, which up to now has concentrated on economic liberalization.
NEWS
May 20, 1990 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The general who once bragged he had "absolute power" over South Vietnam sat in a Little Saigon law office, chain-smoking Winstons and talking about a post-communist world. "We fought them with guns. We failed," former South Vietnamese premier Nguyen Cao Ky said Friday. "Now Marxism is finished. . . . We should fight them in the field of politics and economics."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1995 | DEBORAH SULLIVAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than 200 protesters gathered in Little Saigon on Sunday morning to voice their anger at the Clinton Administration's decision to consider renewing diplomatic ties with Vietnam. "We oppose that decision," said Diem Do, spokesman for the 20 Years of Struggle for Freedom Campaign, a group of Vietnamese immigrants and Vietnamese Americans commemorating the 20th anniversary of the fall of South Vietnam. "We oppose unconditional diplomatic relations with Vietnam."
OPINION
April 23, 1995 | William Schneider, Bill Schneider, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a political analyst for CNN
So former Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara says the Vietnam War was "wrong." Big deal. The American people figured that out 27 years ago. It happened in 1968, to be precise, a few months after the Tet Offensive disproved the Johnson Administration's claim that there was "a light at the end of the tunnel." Beginning in 1965, the Gallup poll regularly asked Americans whether the United States had made a mistake sending troops to Vietnam.
BUSINESS
April 25, 1994 | From Associated Press
U.S. airlines eager for business in Vietnam are finding that politics still hampers them, despite the end of America's 19-year economic embargo. The United States lifted sanctions against Vietnam on Feb. 3, but it has yet to establish diplomatic relations with its onetime enemy. The normalization of relations usually precedes the signing of the aviation agreements that allow regular passenger flights.
NEWS
January 29, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A day after the Senate called for a lifting of the trade embargo against Vietnam, groups representing families of former prisoners of war appealed to the White House to delay the move until Hanoi provides more information on military personnel still listed as missing in Southeast Asia.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1993
Thu-Huong Nguyen-Vo, author of "Khmer-Viet Relations and the Third Indochina Conflict," will be interviewed on the air at 6 p.m. today by KUCI, the student radio station at UC Irvine. The radio interview will focus on current issues in Vietnam. Nguyen-Vo is a second-year doctoral student in political science at UCI. Her research focuses on political order in former socialist countries.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 24, 1993 | BART MILLS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Three years ago this month, ABC went into production on a TV movie about the Vietnam War that dared to tell the story of the only convicted U.S. turncoat from his point of view. Only Monday, however, will "The Last P.O.W.? The Bobby Garwood Story" make it to the air, 2 1/2 years after its originally designated broadcast date. "I gave up on it a year ago," admits Ralph Macchio, who stars as Garwood, a U.S. Marine who spent 13 years as a prisoner of war. "I stopped calling the network.
NEWS
January 2, 1991 | From Associated Press
The Vietnamese Communist war hero who accepted the surrender of Saigon in 1975 now pleads in radio broadcasts for democratic reforms in his homeland. Saying that Hanoi's leadership must escape from narrow Marxist-Leninist dogma, Col. Bui Tin offered a grim New Year's Day prediction from Paris. "If we don't change, there will be an explosion this year, because the people can't take it anymore," Tin said. "We must make a real opening, to do away with this bureaucracy, dogmatism, conservatism. . .
OPINION
April 23, 1995 | William Schneider, Bill Schneider, a contributing editor to Opinion, is a political analyst for CNN
So former Defense Secretary Robert S. McNamara says the Vietnam War was "wrong." Big deal. The American people figured that out 27 years ago. It happened in 1968, to be precise, a few months after the Tet Offensive disproved the Johnson Administration's claim that there was "a light at the end of the tunnel." Beginning in 1965, the Gallup poll regularly asked Americans whether the United States had made a mistake sending troops to Vietnam.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of President Bush's key Orange County-based Vietnamese-American supporters said Thursday that he would resign from the President's reelection campaign if Bush proceeds with plans to normalize U.S. relations with Vietnam before Inauguration Day. "It would be wrong for us to recognize a country that still oppresses the Vietnamese people," said Ky Ngo, a co-chairman of the Bush/Quayle campaign in Orange County. "I oppose that and I think the majority of Vietnamese (Americans) oppose it."
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