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July 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
Vietnam announced that its population has grown to 64.4 million, and it called on all families to have no more than two children. The official Vietnam News Agency said the population had grown by 11.7 million since the last census in 1979, representing a high annual growth rate of 2.13%. An editorial in the Communist Party's newspaper, Nhan Dan, urged all people to observe the national target of one or two children per family, the agency said.
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NEWS
July 8, 1989 | From Associated Press
Vietnam announced that its population has grown to 64.4 million, and it called on all families to have no more than two children. The official Vietnam News Agency said the population had grown by 11.7 million since the last census in 1979, representing a high annual growth rate of 2.13%. An editorial in the Communist Party's newspaper, Nhan Dan, urged all people to observe the national target of one or two children per family, the agency said.
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NEWS
May 6, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Hard hit by shortages across the board, Vietnam suffers most in the area that is critical for many underdeveloped countries--a lack of food. Three years of stalled crop production have reduced the amount of food per capita by 8% since 1985. There is little money in the treasury to buy food abroad, and in a sort of Catch-22, the country's prime prospect for building financial reserves is exporting food. Malnutrition, a constant hazard in Vietnam, has worsened. So has the budget deficit.
NEWS
May 6, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Hard hit by shortages across the board, Vietnam suffers most in the area that is critical for many underdeveloped countries--a lack of food. Three years of stalled crop production have reduced the amount of food per capita by 8% since 1985. There is little money in the treasury to buy food abroad, and in a sort of Catch-22, the country's prime prospect for building financial reserves is exporting food. Malnutrition, a constant hazard in Vietnam, has worsened. So has the budget deficit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 20, 1991
It's disgusting to see that The Times is once again lobbying to help the Hanoi regime escape its inevitable collapse by urging Congress to allow AT&T to set up telecommunications between America and Vietnam ("Reach Out and Touch Someone," editorial, June 27). In October, 1990, The Times loudly advocated abolishing the Trade Embargo Act and urged Washington to establish diplomatic relations with Communist Hanoi. By doing that, The Times urged America to recognize a bunch of thugs in Hanoi, who violently and forcefully took over South Vietnam on April 30, 1975.
NEWS
February 9, 1991 | HARRY G. SUMMERS Jr.
Body count. That's one of the more grisly aspects of the Vietnam War that the U.S. military can't seem to shed, no matter how hard it tries. Time after time, Gen. H.
OPINION
November 20, 2006
Re "Bush arrives in Vietnam for trade talks," Nov. 17 There seems to be a growing consensus that we need to Vietnamize -- excuse me, "Iraqize" -- the Iraq war as our means of getting out. That this self-responsibility is always the solution ought to be food for thought about any justification for invasion. Vietnam is better off simply by not being at war. Is Iraq better off without Saddam Hussein? It looks like insurgents plus militia and a few foreign fighters are killing more Iraqis annually than Hussein ever did. Two wrongs never make a right.
NEWS
March 3, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Last summer, a remarkable event happened in this isolated commune: Peasant farmers protesting corruption, high taxes and government unresponsiveness rebelled against local leaders, taking hostages and disrupting the rice harvest. The uprising, which spread to other locales and lasted several months, unleashed nightmarish visions in Hanoi.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 1988 | MARY LOU FULTON, Times Staff Writer
The ceremony began in late afternoon, the bright sun bringing squints to the eyes of those gathered before a marble statue depicting the Virgin Mary perched in one corner of the church courtyard. The statue, draped by a white ankle-length cape, stood a few feet above a shallow basin where water trickled gently from among charcoal-colored rocks. Parishioners listened proudly as officials of St.
BUSINESS
March 12, 1993 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Bank of America has become the first U.S. financial institution to win permission to open an office in Vietnam--18 years after the Communists drove American troops from Saigon. At a news conference Thursday in Hanoi--a city once regularly targeted by U.S. warplanes--a B of A executive showed off the license awarded by the Vietnamese government and called it a breakthrough.
BUSINESS
August 23, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The bulls are running, sort of, on Ben Chuong Duong Street, where the world's newest and smallest stock exchange has opened amid a flurry of excitement as Communist investors flirt with the potential rewards of capitalism. Since the exchange's much-delayed debut July 28, trading has been slow, but that's fine with the government. The Vietnam index has risen every trading day, adding 17% to stand at 117.24.
NEWS
November 14, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Suddenly everyone seems to be speaking French and eating croissants again. Old men are wearing berets. Colonial French villas have been repainted. Banners draped over cafes and restaurants proclaim, "Bienvenue!" The French are back, and Hanoi is all smiles.
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