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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1993 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the beginning, there was the criticism. Irate Vietnamese last summer called the Social Assistance Program for Vietnam naive in trying to collect humanitarian aid for the Southeast Asian country. Easing poverty in the Communist land would just help the government stay in power, they said in numerous phone calls to the nonprofit group. The harshest blow came in September in an editorial in Tieng Chuong (Sound of a Bell), a Vietnamese-language weekly newspaper in Westminster.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1999 | THUY-DOAN LE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than 1,000 people on Saturday attended the largest local fund-raiser yet to benefit victims of the flooding in Vietnam, raising about $63,500 for the Red Cross Relief Fund. Proceeds from the event will be used to purchase food and clothing and help with other relief efforts in the central portion of Vietnam, where the worst flooding in more than 30 years killed 500 and destroyed thousands of homes. In one province, Thua Thien-Hue, more than 300 have died.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1992 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chau Nguyen never thought her job as a newly graduated optometrist would be a dream come true. For the 29-year-old Anaheim woman, the dream does not entail landing a high-paying job in Beverly Hills. Instead, it has more to do with her being chosen to travel to Vietnam with a group of veteran eye specialists from America to provide free health care there. She will be leaving Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1993 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the beginning, there was the criticism. Irate Vietnamese last summer called the Social Assistance Program for Vietnam naive in trying to collect humanitarian aid for the Southeast Asian country. Easing poverty in the Communist land would just help the government stay in power, they said in numerous phone calls to the nonprofit group. The harshest blow came in September in an editorial in Tieng Chuong (Sound of a Bell), a Vietnamese-language weekly newspaper in Westminster.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1988 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
The government of Vietnam, which expelled religious relief agencies such as World Vision in 1975, has invited the California-based organization back into the Communist country. World Vision's acceptance does not come without irony and mixed emotions. President Robert Seiple, whose office is at the evangelical Christian organization's headquarters in Monrovia, flew 300 combat missions over North Vietnam in the 1960s as a much-decorated U.S. Marine Corps pilot.
NEWS
September 7, 1987 | United Press International
The United States expects Vietnam to help locate more than 2,400 military personnel still missing from the Vietnam War because of a recent agreement to encourage organizations to provide medical relief there, a published report said Sunday. Last week, two doctors specializing in artificial limbs and the director of an international charitable organization accompanied a U.S. delegation to Hanoi for talks, the New York Times reported.
NEWS
August 23, 1987
The Reagan Administration said it has dispatched three U.S. medical experts to Vietnam under an agreement to give that country humanitarian help and receive information on Americans missing in the Indochina War. The experts, including two specialists in orthopedic rehabilitation, will be in Hanoi for three days of talks, according to the State Department. In early August, retired Gen. John W. Vessey Jr.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 14, 1999 | THUY-DOAN LE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
More than 1,000 people on Saturday attended the largest local fund-raiser yet to benefit victims of the flooding in Vietnam, raising about $63,500 for the Red Cross Relief Fund. Proceeds from the event will be used to purchase food and clothing and help with other relief efforts in the central portion of Vietnam, where the worst flooding in more than 30 years killed 500 and destroyed thousands of homes. In one province, Thua Thien-Hue, more than 300 have died.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 7, 1997 | TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The last time Bang Cong Nguyen tried to rally aid for disaster victims in Vietnam, he was roundly criticized in the Vietnamese American community in Orange County. That's because raising money, even for victims of tragedy in Vietnam, is not just the humanitarian task it seems. In the Vietnamese American community, where war-era tensions still run high, it can also be a political minefield.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 29, 2000 | MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Leaders of Vietnamese groups trying to raise funds for their flood-ravaged homeland are changing the way they seek donations because the local community has grown increasingly wary about such pitches. They are giving badges and passwords to volunteers who take coded donation boxes to Vietnamese businesses, escorted by other volunteers who videotape the transactions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1992 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Chau Nguyen never thought her job as a newly graduated optometrist would be a dream come true. For the 29-year-old Anaheim woman, the dream does not entail landing a high-paying job in Beverly Hills. Instead, it has more to do with her being chosen to travel to Vietnam with a group of veteran eye specialists from America to provide free health care there. She will be leaving Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 1988 | JOHN DART, Times Religion Writer
The government of Vietnam, which expelled religious relief agencies such as World Vision in 1975, has invited the California-based organization back into the Communist country. World Vision's acceptance does not come without irony and mixed emotions. President Robert Seiple, whose office is at the evangelical Christian organization's headquarters in Monrovia, flew 300 combat missions over North Vietnam in the 1960s as a much-decorated U.S. Marine Corps pilot.
NEWS
September 7, 1987 | United Press International
The United States expects Vietnam to help locate more than 2,400 military personnel still missing from the Vietnam War because of a recent agreement to encourage organizations to provide medical relief there, a published report said Sunday. Last week, two doctors specializing in artificial limbs and the director of an international charitable organization accompanied a U.S. delegation to Hanoi for talks, the New York Times reported.
NEWS
August 23, 1987
The Reagan Administration said it has dispatched three U.S. medical experts to Vietnam under an agreement to give that country humanitarian help and receive information on Americans missing in the Indochina War. The experts, including two specialists in orthopedic rehabilitation, will be in Hanoi for three days of talks, according to the State Department. In early August, retired Gen. John W. Vessey Jr.
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