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BUSINESS
November 9, 1995
Vietnam Plans to Build Elevated Train System: The Southeast Asian country's Transportation Ministry plans to start building a $839-million network of elevated trains in Hanoi to help ease the capital's suffocating traffic problems, a ministry official said. The first section of track will cost about $464 million, with much of the money expected to come as aid from Germany.
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NEWS
February 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Ho Chi Minh Trail, the snaking jungle thoroughfare that funneled Communist troops and supplies during the Vietnam War, is to become a two-lane national highway. The Vietnamese government announced at a news conference Friday its plans for a roughly 1,000-mile road from the northern province of Ha Tay to the southern hub of Ho Chi Minh City, formerly Saigon, along the old route of supply lines for the Viet Cong, the former South Vietnam's Communist guerrillas.
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BUSINESS
January 31, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
At Least $20 Billion Needed for Highway Work: Experts at an international seminar on roads and bridges estimated that the nation needs between $20 billion and $25 billion to rebuild its road system, the Vietnam News Agency reported. Almost half of Vietnam's 66,000 miles of roads have been rated poor by the United Nations. Many roads have no shoulders, poor drainage and are filled with potholes. About a dozen U.S. companies are registered to bid on the project in July.
NEWS
June 6, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southeast Asia is turning its back on the trusty vehicle that moved the region into modern times--the bicycle. Bikes have all but vanished from the car-clogged streets of Bangkok, Manila and Jakarta, and they are disappearing fast from other capitals as well. The only real urban refuge left for bike commuters in Southeast Asia is Vietnam, where the nation's 30 million bicycles outnumber motor scooters 6 to 1 and cars 60 to 1.
NEWS
October 10, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With conductors waving old-fashioned kerosene lanterns, the "reunification express" passenger train rumbles out of this capital each night promptly at 8, bound for Ho Chi Minh City, formerly Saigon, 34 hours and 1,078 miles away.
NEWS
February 19, 2000 | From Associated Press
The Ho Chi Minh Trail, the snaking jungle thoroughfare that funneled Communist troops and supplies during the Vietnam War, is to become a two-lane national highway. The Vietnamese government announced at a news conference Friday its plans for a roughly 1,000-mile road from the northern province of Ha Tay to the southern hub of Ho Chi Minh City, formerly Saigon, along the old route of supply lines for the Viet Cong, the former South Vietnam's Communist guerrillas.
NEWS
June 6, 1998 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Southeast Asia is turning its back on the trusty vehicle that moved the region into modern times--the bicycle. Bikes have all but vanished from the car-clogged streets of Bangkok, Manila and Jakarta, and they are disappearing fast from other capitals as well. The only real urban refuge left for bike commuters in Southeast Asia is Vietnam, where the nation's 30 million bicycles outnumber motor scooters 6 to 1 and cars 60 to 1.
TRAVEL
January 31, 1993 | CHRISTOPHER REYNOLDS, TIMES TRAVEL WRITER
Vietnam is not an easy place to visit. But since 13 months ago, when the U.S. government quietly eased its restrictions on tourism there, American travelers have shown accelerating interest in the "new frontier" of Southeast Asian tourism. On Dec. 17, 1991, the U.S. Treasury Department made it legal for American travel agents and tour operators to sell airline tickets, hotel accommodations and package tours to Vietnam--for the first time since U.S.
TRAVEL
October 12, 1997 | KARIN DOMINELLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A nine-day Mediterranean Archeology travel study program hosted by the OTS Foundation for Education and Historic Preservation in Malta leaves Los Angeles May 9. Participants will learn about civilizations that left behind stone monuments. The earliest structure has been dated back to nearly 6,000 years ago, and artifacts exist from 1,000 years before that. Robert H. Tykot, assistant professor of Anthropology at the University of South Florida, will lead the group.
NEWS
February 16, 1991 | SONNI EFRON and MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
More than 15 years have passed since Vu Duy Thanh heard the train of death rumbling through the sky above, that dreadful drone of the American B-52s and the horrible few seconds that followed each time, as 1,000-pound bombs whistled down on his hometown of Haiphong. "You do not forget this sound, ever," Thanh said. "North Vietnamese people, we know what is B-52." Thanh relived the memory just weeks ago in Iraq, where, as a road-crew worker, he observed the latest B-52 bombing sorties.
NEWS
October 10, 1997 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With conductors waving old-fashioned kerosene lanterns, the "reunification express" passenger train rumbles out of this capital each night promptly at 8, bound for Ho Chi Minh City, formerly Saigon, 34 hours and 1,078 miles away.
BUSINESS
November 9, 1995
Vietnam Plans to Build Elevated Train System: The Southeast Asian country's Transportation Ministry plans to start building a $839-million network of elevated trains in Hanoi to help ease the capital's suffocating traffic problems, a ministry official said. The first section of track will cost about $464 million, with much of the money expected to come as aid from Germany.
BUSINESS
February 20, 1995 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Bidding on Road Project Opens: Construction companies from 14 countries have started bidding on projects worth $317 million to resurface and widen Vietnam's main Highway 1. The bidders include Morrison Knudsen Corp. and Brown & Root International Inc. of the United States, and South Korea's Hyundai Corp., the Vietnam News said. The government expects to select the winners in August, and work is to begin in November, the paper said. Completion is expected in 1997.
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