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Vietnam Veterans Health

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July 12, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Federal health officials Tuesday denied that political pressure from the Ronald Reagan White House resulted in their 1987 decision to cancel a major study of the health effects of Agent Orange on Vietnam veterans, insisting that military records were inadequate to verify the exposure of military personnel to the herbicide. No one "ever attempted to put political influence on any of these Agent Orange studies," said Dr. Vernon N.
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July 12, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
Federal health officials Tuesday denied that political pressure from the Ronald Reagan White House resulted in their 1987 decision to cancel a major study of the health effects of Agent Orange on Vietnam veterans, insisting that military records were inadequate to verify the exposure of military personnel to the herbicide. No one "ever attempted to put political influence on any of these Agent Orange studies," said Dr. Vernon N.
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November 12, 1988 | LAURIE DUNCAN, Times Staff Writer
The American Legion, criticizing the federal government for its sluggish pace in handling Vietnam veterans' health problems, released a study Friday that shows an "alarming" trend of physical and emotional problems among soldiers who were involved in heavy combat. According to the study, "combat intensity significantly relates to a history of high blood pressure, ulcers, arthritis, rheumatism, kidney problems and more," Dr. Steven Stellman said at a press conference.
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May 12, 1988 | JANNY SCOTT, Times Medical Writer
The most comprehensive study ever done of the physical and mental health of Vietnam veterans has concluded that they have been no less successful in adjusting to employment, marriage and civilian life than veterans who never served in that war. The federal report, released Wednesday, found Vietnam veterans somewhat more likely to suffer from anxiety, depression and alcohol dependence or abuse.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 20, 1990 | RAY TESSLER and TOM GORMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The moment a wife has dreaded since the day she married a Marine has come. The Marine Corps has a steel-cold bureaucratic word for it, deployment, while the troops, with frontier bravado, call it mounting out. But, to the wives of Marines who have hurriedly left Camp Pendleton for the Middle East crisis, both terms mean only one thing: Their husbands have gone off to war.
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