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Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund

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NEWS
February 3, 1986
The names of 96 Vietnam veterans who died outside the war's official combat zone will be inscribed on the Vietnam Memorial in Washington this spring, Jan Scruggs, president of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund, said. The 96 were not among the original 57,939 names on the memorial because their names were not on the Defense Department's official list of war casualties. They were killed outside the war zone while taking part in missions directly related to combat, Scruggs said.
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ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2003
Christopher Knight's article, "America's Maul" (April 20), was as absurdly mistitled as it was grossly inaccurate in commenting on the planned visitor center for America's youth at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. What has become known as "the Wall" remains the most visited memorial in Washington, D.C. Knight's opposition to the center simply parrots the arguments used unsuccessfully to stop the grand memorial from being placed on the Mall. We prevailed in 1980 against the smaller-minded who failed to stop the Wall from being placed in its prominent location between the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1989
Author Jan Scruggs, often credited as the moving force behind the construction of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, will unveil a Vietnam Veteran Memorial commemorative medallion set today at the Irvine Marriott. Sales of the commemorative sets are expected to raise $250,000 for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund. Proceeds will be used to maintain and add to the memorial in the nation's capital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
They had heard about William Johnston from the time they were in kindergarten. They had played on the baseball field named for the school's first valedictorian, first student body president and first former student to die in the Vietnam War. Now the fifth-grade students from Meadow Oaks Elementary School had a chance to see Johnston's name again--listed along with more than 58,000 others on "The Wall That Heals," a half-scale replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C.
NEWS
May 7, 1988 | United Press International
Stone specialists inspecting vandalism to the black granite Vietnam Veterans Memorial said Friday that the damage should be easy to repair. "It does not look like a serious problem," said Gene Simmons, a stone and construction specialist brought in to inspect the wall where someone scrawled a swastika-like symbol and other lines. Simmons called the scratches superficial and said they can likely be fixed with "a small amount of polishing and buffing."
NEWS
May 4, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
Decrying the first incident of vandalism of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, the private group that built the monument here posted a $1,000 reward Tuesday for information on the crime as veterans condemned the defacement of a site they hold sacred. "This is a desecration of something very dear to our hearts, something that we fought so hard to realize," said veteran David Pye of Massachusetts as he visited the monument and examined the faint marks scratched into its hard surface.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1992 | JOHN WHEELER, John Wheeler, chairman of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund from 1979 to 1989, is a Washington-based writer whose focus is the Vietnam War generation.
On March 14, 1983, former Atty. Gen. Elliot Richardson wrote to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund that Ross Perot "has hired a mean lawyer. . . . I have known Roy Cohn since 1947, and if you want me to make him feel embarrassed for taking Ross Perot's cause, I would be glad to oblige." Cohn was the notorious former aide to the late Sen. Joe McCarthy.
NEWS
March 12, 1986 | BETTY CUNIBERTI, Times Staff Writer
Like the millions of others who make the pilgrimage each year, Leo Broadhead of Oklahoma came to see the Vietnam Veterans Memorial here one day to gaze at a name carved on a granite wall--to touch it, weep in front of it, perhaps photograph it, or leave a flower. In Broadhead's case the name he was looking for was Larry Broadhead, his son, who had been killed in 1969 when his B-52 bomber crashed. It had been his 88th combat mission. He was 25.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1997 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
They had heard about William Johnston from the time they were in kindergarten. They had played on the baseball field named for the school's first valedictorian, first student body president and first former student to die in the Vietnam War. Now the fifth-grade students from Meadow Oaks Elementary School had a chance to see Johnston's name again--listed along with more than 58,000 others on "The Wall That Heals," a half-scale replica of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, D.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 2003
Christopher Knight's article, "America's Maul" (April 20), was as absurdly mistitled as it was grossly inaccurate in commenting on the planned visitor center for America's youth at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial. What has become known as "the Wall" remains the most visited memorial in Washington, D.C. Knight's opposition to the center simply parrots the arguments used unsuccessfully to stop the grand memorial from being placed on the Mall. We prevailed in 1980 against the smaller-minded who failed to stop the Wall from being placed in its prominent location between the Washington Monument and the Lincoln Memorial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 22, 1992 | DEBRA CANO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Elaine Roach was 8 years old when her father, Navy pilot Lt. Harold S. Roach Jr., became one of the early casualties of the Vietnam War. While on a mission in the South China Sea, Roach died in a plane crash Oct. 2, 1964. He was 31. Today, Elaine Roach of La Habra has her own mission: to win for her father the honor and recognition given to other dead veterans of that war. The challenge began last June when Roach went to Washington to observe Father's Day at the Vietnam Veterans Memorial.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 3, 1992 | JOHN WHEELER, John Wheeler, chairman of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund from 1979 to 1989, is a Washington-based writer whose focus is the Vietnam War generation.
On March 14, 1983, former Atty. Gen. Elliot Richardson wrote to the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund that Ross Perot "has hired a mean lawyer. . . . I have known Roy Cohn since 1947, and if you want me to make him feel embarrassed for taking Ross Perot's cause, I would be glad to oblige." Cohn was the notorious former aide to the late Sen. Joe McCarthy.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Vietnam Veterans Memorial, a pair of polished granite walls that has become the capital's most visited monument, has developed hairline cracks and will require extensive future repairs, the project's principal fund-raiser said Tuesday. Jan C. Scruggs, president of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund, said the organization has launched a direct-mail drive to raise about $1 million to finance the unanticipated repairs and other long-term maintenance needs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1989
Author Jan Scruggs, often credited as the moving force behind the construction of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Washington, will unveil a Vietnam Veteran Memorial commemorative medallion set today at the Irvine Marriott. Sales of the commemorative sets are expected to raise $250,000 for the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund. Proceeds will be used to maintain and add to the memorial in the nation's capital.
NEWS
May 7, 1988 | United Press International
Stone specialists inspecting vandalism to the black granite Vietnam Veterans Memorial said Friday that the damage should be easy to repair. "It does not look like a serious problem," said Gene Simmons, a stone and construction specialist brought in to inspect the wall where someone scrawled a swastika-like symbol and other lines. Simmons called the scratches superficial and said they can likely be fixed with "a small amount of polishing and buffing."
NEWS
May 4, 1988 | ERIC LICHTBLAU, Times Staff Writer
Decrying the first incident of vandalism of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, the private group that built the monument here posted a $1,000 reward Tuesday for information on the crime as veterans condemned the defacement of a site they hold sacred. "This is a desecration of something very dear to our hearts, something that we fought so hard to realize," said veteran David Pye of Massachusetts as he visited the monument and examined the faint marks scratched into its hard surface.
NEWS
February 7, 1990 | DON SHANNON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Vietnam Veterans Memorial, a pair of polished granite walls that has become the capital's most visited monument, has developed hairline cracks and will require extensive future repairs, the project's principal fund-raiser said Tuesday. Jan C. Scruggs, president of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial Fund, said the organization has launched a direct-mail drive to raise about $1 million to finance the unanticipated repairs and other long-term maintenance needs.
NEWS
May 27, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
On a day set aside to honor America's war dead, 110 men were officially recognized Monday as victims of the Vietnam War after their names were added to the black granite memorial to victims of that war. About 450 relatives of the men attended the ceremony. An additional 2,000 people, many of them Vietnam veterans in old fatigues and slouch hats, stood quietly during the one-hour ceremony.
NEWS
May 27, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
On a day set aside to honor America's war dead, 110 men were officially recognized Monday as victims of the Vietnam War after their names were added to the black granite memorial to victims of that war. About 450 relatives of the men attended the ceremony. An additional 2,000 people, many of them Vietnam veterans in old fatigues and slouch hats, stood quietly during the one-hour ceremony.
NEWS
March 12, 1986 | BETTY CUNIBERTI, Times Staff Writer
Like the millions of others who make the pilgrimage each year, Leo Broadhead of Oklahoma came to see the Vietnam Veterans Memorial here one day to gaze at a name carved on a granite wall--to touch it, weep in front of it, perhaps photograph it, or leave a flower. In Broadhead's case the name he was looking for was Larry Broadhead, his son, who had been killed in 1969 when his B-52 bomber crashed. It had been his 88th combat mission. He was 25.
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