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Vietnam War Veterans Health

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NEWS
September 2, 1988
A new study of Vietnam veterans suggests that most escaped heavy exposure to the poison dioxin, even if they served as ground troops in areas extensively sprayed with the dioxin-containing herbicide Agent Orange. But a Vietnam veterans' spokesman criticized the study as a twisted rehash of old data.
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NEWS
July 28, 1993 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Veterans Affairs Secretary Jesse Brown announced Tuesday that Vietnam veterans suffering from Hodgkin's disease and an uncommon liver disorder will be eligible for special disability payments based on their presumed exposure to Agent Orange and other herbicides.
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NEWS
November 12, 1988 | LAURIE DUNCAN, Times Staff Writer
The American Legion, criticizing the federal government for its sluggish pace in handling Vietnam veterans' health problems, released a study Friday that shows an "alarming" trend of physical and emotional problems among soldiers who were involved in heavy combat. According to the study, "combat intensity significantly relates to a history of high blood pressure, ulcers, arthritis, rheumatism, kidney problems and more," Dr. Steven Stellman said at a press conference.
NEWS
August 22, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After he returned from Vietnam in 1966, Hong Seung Uk's bones began to ache and strange spots appeared on his skin. Rheumatism, the doctors told him. When his son was born mentally retarded and with deformed legs, Hong and his wife ascribed it to bad luck. Today, Hong's chest is paralyzed and he must breathe through a pipe in his chest.
NEWS
July 28, 1993 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Veterans Affairs Secretary Jesse Brown announced Tuesday that Vietnam veterans suffering from Hodgkin's disease and an uncommon liver disorder will be eligible for special disability payments based on their presumed exposure to Agent Orange and other herbicides.
NEWS
August 22, 1992 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After he returned from Vietnam in 1966, Hong Seung Uk's bones began to ache and strange spots appeared on his skin. Rheumatism, the doctors told him. When his son was born mentally retarded and with deformed legs, Hong and his wife ascribed it to bad luck. Today, Hong's chest is paralyzed and he must breathe through a pipe in his chest.
NEWS
May 19, 1990 | From United Press International
In the government's first admission linking Agent Orange to a serious medical problem, Veterans Affairs Secretary Edward J. Derwinski directed his agency Friday to pay $8 million a year to Vietnam veterans afflicted by a broad class of cancers.
NEWS
July 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange may receive disability benefits for a nerve disease, the Department of Veterans Affairs ruled, but the agency denied links between the herbicide and lung cancer. The VA put off a decision on whether diabetes is related to Agent Orange exposure, waiting for a National Academy of Sciences study expected to be concluded in a year. Agent Orange was sprayed by U.S. troops in Vietnam to remove jungle cover.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | From Associated Press
A House committee concluded Thursday that White House officials in the Ronald Reagan Administration "controlled and obstructed" a federal study of Agent Orange exposure among Vietnam veterans. The congressional panel said that a secret White House strategy to deny federal liability in toxic exposure cases led to the cancellation of the Centers for Disease Control study in 1987.
NEWS
July 2, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange may receive disability benefits for a nerve disease, the Department of Veterans Affairs ruled, but the agency denied links between the herbicide and lung cancer. The VA put off a decision on whether diabetes is related to Agent Orange exposure, waiting for a National Academy of Sciences study expected to be concluded in a year. Agent Orange was sprayed by U.S. troops in Vietnam to remove jungle cover.
NEWS
August 10, 1990 | From Associated Press
A House committee concluded Thursday that White House officials in the Ronald Reagan Administration "controlled and obstructed" a federal study of Agent Orange exposure among Vietnam veterans. The congressional panel said that a secret White House strategy to deny federal liability in toxic exposure cases led to the cancellation of the Centers for Disease Control study in 1987.
NEWS
May 19, 1990 | From United Press International
In the government's first admission linking Agent Orange to a serious medical problem, Veterans Affairs Secretary Edward J. Derwinski directed his agency Friday to pay $8 million a year to Vietnam veterans afflicted by a broad class of cancers.
NEWS
November 12, 1988 | LAURIE DUNCAN, Times Staff Writer
The American Legion, criticizing the federal government for its sluggish pace in handling Vietnam veterans' health problems, released a study Friday that shows an "alarming" trend of physical and emotional problems among soldiers who were involved in heavy combat. According to the study, "combat intensity significantly relates to a history of high blood pressure, ulcers, arthritis, rheumatism, kidney problems and more," Dr. Steven Stellman said at a press conference.
NEWS
September 2, 1988
A new study of Vietnam veterans suggests that most escaped heavy exposure to the poison dioxin, even if they served as ground troops in areas extensively sprayed with the dioxin-containing herbicide Agent Orange. But a Vietnam veterans' spokesman criticized the study as a twisted rehash of old data.
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