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Vietnam War Veterans Orange County

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February 3, 1994 | ALICIA DI RADO and ELAINE TASSY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Barbara Robertson can't let the past rest. She's tired of waiting, tired of having her hopes whipped up only to be dashed, and tired of wishing that her husband--an Air Force pilot missing in action in the Vietnam War since 1966--will come home. Now Robertson, a 62-year-old activist pushing for the return of American prisoners taken captive during the war, is up in arms about the U.S. government's plan to resume trade with Vietnam. She fears it will erase any chance of seeing her husband again.
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NEWS
July 11, 1995 | TINA NGUYEN and DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
For Vietnam veteran Bob Kakuk, 49, of Huntington Beach, President Clinton's expected announcement on normalized relations with Vietnam is a symbolic violation of the U.S. soldier's credo never to leave fallen comrades behind. "When we were in basic training, we were taught you never leave your men there," Kakuk said in reference to missing U.S. servicemen. "And here, we're doing it again. "[But] we have a President who hasn't kept one campaign promise," Kakuk said.
NEWS
February 3, 1994 | DOREEN CARVAJAL and MICHAEL ROSS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
From VFW posts to Little Saigon restaurants, from suburban homes to spare storefront offices, the opposition scrambled this week to mobilize a last-ditch campaign to dissuade President Clinton from lifting the trade embargo with Vietnam on Friday as expected. For decades, the rhetorical battle over Vietnam's future has been waged by the fiercely loyal opposition of war widows and veterans, grieving parents and immigrants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 11, 1989 | TED JOHNSON, Times Staff Writer
Samuel Silberling, Fred Hummer and Cecil Kepler were in high school 75 years ago this month as Europe's powers plunged into the Great War. They, like others, read the news on June 28, 1914, of Austrian Archduke Francis Ferdinand's assassination, which struck a nerve among Europe's most powerful nations. By August, the intricate system of alliances and crosscurrents of nationalism and aggression helped pull Germany, Russia, Britain and France into the war.
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