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Vietnam War Women

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ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1988 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
Last spring, ABC's mid-season series "China Beach" became an instant hit by exploring the lives of the women behind the lines in the Vietnam War. This fall, "Tour of Duty," the CBS Vietnam series, which struggled in the ratings last season as it tracked the men of one platoon through the horrors of combat, will move the action from the jungle into Saigon--mainly to bring women into the story.
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ENTERTAINMENT
November 30, 1988 | DIANE HAITHMAN, Times Staff Writer
Last spring, ABC's mid-season series "China Beach" became an instant hit by exploring the lives of the women behind the lines in the Vietnam War. This fall, "Tour of Duty," the CBS Vietnam series, which struggled in the ratings last season as it tracked the men of one platoon through the horrors of combat, will move the action from the jungle into Saigon--mainly to bring women into the story.
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NEWS
May 26, 1992 | KATHLEEN HENDRIX, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A framed photo of the happy couple on their wedding day stands on a living room table, the bride in a traditional white gown, the groom in a tux. They live in a cozy house with a white picket fence, flowers and a big dog. The wife serves coffee and cheerfully disappears.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2011 | By Diana Marcum, Los Angeles Times
They promised a funeral fit for a king. There were to be dignitaries; a long red carpet; thousands of pigs, cows, chickens and ducks to be sacrificed for feasting. It had to be a funeral that crossed cultures and time, peace and war. For this was both goodbye to one man and to the founding era of a people. So thousands of mourners ? including the exiled prince of Laos, widows of Hmong soldiers who died in a "secret" war and families who battled an East Coast blizzard to make it in time ?
NEWS
April 26, 1989 | NOEL K. WILSON, Times Staff Writer
In an emotional ceremony Tuesday, speakers praised the "unsung heroines" of the Vietnam War, the combat nurses and other female veterans, during a ceremony recognizing the recent addition of the women's panel to the still-unfinished California Vietnam Veterans Memorial in Sacramento's Capitol Park. "In Vietnam, (the nurses) were not only responsible for saving lives," Assemblywoman Jackie Speier (D-South San Francisco) said, "they also substituted as mothers, as wives, as sisters and as friends to the soldiers wounded and left to their care."
BOOKS
August 11, 1996 | KAREN STABINER
It's a chicken-and-egg question: Do women buy more books than men because they grew up with better books to read than boys--or do girls get better books than boys because the female sex is inherently more interested in words? A friend with a 10-year-old son complains that there is little of value out there but that girls can choose from an array of titles. The New Girls by Beth Gutcheon, is a republication of a 1979 novel, a second cousin to the classic boys' prep school story, "A Separate Peace" and younger sister to Mary McCarthy's college-and-beyond coming-of-age story, "The Group."
BOOKS
September 22, 2002 | JAMES E. CACCAVO, James E. Caccavo is a writer, photographer and former editor who worked in Vietnam from 1968 to 1970 for the Red Cross and Newsweek magazine. He is a trustee on the Indochina Media Memorial Foundation and a contributor to the Requiem book and exhibit project.
War is an equal opportunity abuser. It wounds or kills whomever it wants, whenever it wants, regardless of age or gender. But for women wanting to cover the war in Vietnam, the news media in the 1960s were not equal opportunity employers. Women covering the war were confronted with more than one adversary. Besides the North Vietnamese Army and the Viet Cong, women had to deal with discouraging attitudes from their employers and American military brass.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 2, 2006 | Susan King
The Loved One (Warner Home Video, $20) THOUGH the '70s ushered in a new freedom and maturity on movie screens, the cinematic revolution actually began in the 1960s with the rise of sexually expressive and explicit European films. A matrix of other factors contributed as well -- repercussions of the civil rights movement, the Cold War, the Vietnam War, the women's movement and, of course, the end of the production code that ruled Hollywood for decades.
NEWS
July 23, 2000 | MARK Z. BARABAK, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Long after the final balloons burst and the confetti gets swept away, the most enduring record of this summer's major political conventions will be a pair of volumes destined for some musty shelf. When Republicans gather July 31 in Philadelphia and Democrats meet two weeks later in Los Angeles, one of their first orders of business will be adoption of their respective party platforms.
NEWS
September 23, 2001 | REED JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Bush says it's going to be the centerpiece of his administration. Colin Powell at the State Department, along with Sen. John McCain and a cadre of Capitol Hill lawmakers, are priming the American public for a long, hard campaign akin to the Cold War, or the U.S. home front during World War II. The crusade they speak of is a massive anti-terrorism "war," to be waged militarily on the geopolitical front, as well as socially on the domestic front.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 18, 1999 | HILLEL ITALIE, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Ernest Hemingway, born 100 years ago this summer, is buried in a small cemetery near a two-lane highway, facing the foothills at the base of Bald Mountain. His tombstone is granite and rectangular, inscribed in simple, declarative language: ERNEST MILLER HEMINGWAY JULY 21, 1899 JULY 2, 1961 There is no mention of his widow or three sons. No literary epitaph is offered.
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