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June 4, 1991 | Reuters
More than 100 women from a northern rural province in Vietnam were sold into slavery and sent across the border to China during the first five months of this year, an official newspaper said Monday. "There has been a rise in Hai Hung of the crime of luring women to the border, then selling them to foreigners," the weekly Dai Doan Ket (Great Solidarity) reported. It said that 52 people, including some state employees, are under investigation for possible involvement in the slave trade.
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WORLD
January 10, 2003 | David Lamb, Times Staff Writer
They were the girls of war, teenage volunteers who took up arms in one of the largest female armies any nation has put on a modern battlefield. For years they fought, sustaining themselves with a dream central to Vietnamese culture: When there was peace, they would find a good husband and bear children. For many of them, it was not to be.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1990 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 1,500 people stood in respect as four boys carried a red throne onto the auditorium stage at Valley High School on Sunday afternoon. On the throne was a painting of Vietnam's heroic sister queens, who ruled for three years from about AD 40 and who are still honored each year by Vietnamese overseas with ceremonies such as Sunday's. Two women dressed in red and gold marched solemnly in the procession of about 60 people behind the throne.
NEWS
April 29, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Until Saturday, Bui Thi Luom had never heard the name Bob Kerrey. She had no idea that he served as governor of Nebraska and U.S. senator and once ran for president. But she did know that 32 years ago, seven American commandos sneaked into her village in the Mekong Delta and killed 15 members of her family--all women and children. Luom, wounded in the knee, was the only one to escape. She was 12.
WORLD
January 10, 2003 | David Lamb, Times Staff Writer
They were the girls of war, teenage volunteers who took up arms in one of the largest female armies any nation has put on a modern battlefield. For years they fought, sustaining themselves with a dream central to Vietnamese culture: When there was peace, they would find a good husband and bear children. For many of them, it was not to be.
NEWS
April 29, 2001 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Until Saturday, Bui Thi Luom had never heard the name Bob Kerrey. She had no idea that he served as governor of Nebraska and U.S. senator and once ran for president. But she did know that 32 years ago, seven American commandos sneaked into her village in the Mekong Delta and killed 15 members of her family--all women and children. Luom, wounded in the knee, was the only one to escape. She was 12.
NEWS
May 1, 1992
I am writing in response to Michael Haederle's article "For the Forgotten" (April 29) in which he discusses the much-needed Vietnam Women's Memorial by sculptor Glenna Goodacre. Had women's contributions to the war effort not been discounted and ignored in the first place, perhaps we wouldn't have to wait until the third memorial to highlight them. Perhaps if women were given proper credit for their work, they would not have to battle each time for recognition. JEHAN AGRAMA Beverly Hills
NEWS
April 27, 1995 | PAUL DEAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Let it be accepted that half a million American men and women returned from Vietnam with damaged minds and demolished lives. Let it also be known that 3 million Americans came home intact and functioning; quietly back to jobs and cities and marriages and a country revered before they were so rudely interrupted. This huge and generally silent majority sucked lessons from their 365-day tours in Southeast Asia.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | Associated Press
Congress has voted final approval of a memorial honoring women who served in Vietnam during the nation's longest war. The measure, approved on voice votes Friday and sent to President Reagan, expresses the "sense of Congress" that the memorial be built at the site of the Vietnam Veterans Memorial, but it does not require construction at the site. The measure was a compromise of earlier bills that conflicted on whether the new monument should be at the site of the Vietnam memorial.
NEWS
December 18, 1998 | Associated Press
The U.S. Commission on Fine Arts recommended Thursday that a rendering of Sacagawea with her infant son appear on new gold-colored dollar coins to be minted starting in 2000. The design is one of three finalists for the coin design chosen by the U.S. Mint after sorting through more than 90,000 comments on the Internet. All feature the Shoshone teenager who accompanied explorers Meriwether Lewis and William Clark to the Pacific Ocean in 1805. Treasury Secretary Robert E.
NEWS
June 4, 1991 | Reuters
More than 100 women from a northern rural province in Vietnam were sold into slavery and sent across the border to China during the first five months of this year, an official newspaper said Monday. "There has been a rise in Hai Hung of the crime of luring women to the border, then selling them to foreigners," the weekly Dai Doan Ket (Great Solidarity) reported. It said that 52 people, including some state employees, are under investigation for possible involvement in the slave trade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1990 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
About 1,500 people stood in respect as four boys carried a red throne onto the auditorium stage at Valley High School on Sunday afternoon. On the throne was a painting of Vietnam's heroic sister queens, who ruled for three years from about AD 40 and who are still honored each year by Vietnamese overseas with ceremonies such as Sunday's. Two women dressed in red and gold marched solemnly in the procession of about 60 people behind the throne.
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | From Associated Press
Gen. Colin L. Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, helped break ground Thursday for the Vietnam Women's Memorial and said it was "nine years in the making and more than 20 years in the needing." "When this monument is finished, it will be for all time a testament to a group of American women who made extraordinary sacrifice at an extraordinary time in our nation's history," he said. The ceremony was attended by members of Congress, former Defense Secretary Melvin R.
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE
Santa Fe, N.M., sculptor Glenna Goodacre (View, April 29) is right on schedule with the seven-foot bronze she is producing for the Vietnam Women's Memorial in Washington. She's about a third of the way through the process of molding clay onto a steel framework. Goodacre's figurative design includes an Army nurse sitting on sandbags, cradling a wounded GI in her lap. A second woman stands nearby, scanning the sky for a medevac helicopter; a third woman kneels, a helmet in her hand.
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