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Vietnam Women S Memorial

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1993 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of Eileen Moore's most vivid memories of the Vietnam War was of a young soldier who was regaining consciousness following the amputation of his severely injured leg. His eyes bright, his voice meekly anxious, the soldier asked Moore, a combat nurse, if he was still alive. "I told him, yes, he was still alive but that he lost one of his legs," said Moore, still recalling that moment with clarity 28 years later. "He said, 'Thank God . . . I don't have to go back."
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 12, 1993 | LILY DIZON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of Eileen Moore's most vivid memories of the Vietnam War was of a young soldier who was regaining consciousness following the amputation of his severely injured leg. His eyes bright, his voice meekly anxious, the soldier asked Moore, a combat nurse, if he was still alive. "I told him, yes, he was still alive but that he lost one of his legs," said Moore, still recalling that moment with clarity 28 years later. "He said, 'Thank God . . . I don't have to go back."
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NEWS
May 1, 1992
I am writing in response to Michael Haederle's article "For the Forgotten" (April 29) in which he discusses the much-needed Vietnam Women's Memorial by sculptor Glenna Goodacre. Had women's contributions to the war effort not been discounted and ignored in the first place, perhaps we wouldn't have to wait until the third memorial to highlight them. Perhaps if women were given proper credit for their work, they would not have to battle each time for recognition. JEHAN AGRAMA Beverly Hills
NEWS
November 12, 1993 | MARK BOUSIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sun-lit ceremony that mixed tears, smiles and speeches, the Vietnam Women's Memorial was unveiled Thursday as the United States symbolically welcomed home its female veterans. "The journey for most of us still isn't over," said Diane Carlson Evans, a former army nurse and Vietnam veteran who led a 10-year campaign to create the monument. "Many are just beginning their healing. But this is our place to start."
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | From Associated Press
Gen. Colin L. Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, helped break ground Thursday for the Vietnam Women's Memorial and said it was "nine years in the making and more than 20 years in the needing." "When this monument is finished, it will be for all time a testament to a group of American women who made extraordinary sacrifice at an extraordinary time in our nation's history," he said. The ceremony was attended by members of Congress, former Defense Secretary Melvin R.
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Prowling the winding, adobe-walled streets of town in her red luxury sports coupe, Glenna Goodacre is always on the lookout for potential models. "Did you see her?" Goodacre exclaims, peering into the rearview mirror at the receding image of a woman walking down the sidewalk. "I think I know where she works."
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE
Santa Fe, N.M., sculptor Glenna Goodacre (View, April 29) is right on schedule with the seven-foot bronze she is producing for the Vietnam Women's Memorial in Washington. She's about a third of the way through the process of molding clay onto a steel framework. Goodacre's figurative design includes an Army nurse sitting on sandbags, cradling a wounded GI in her lap. A second woman stands nearby, scanning the sky for a medevac helicopter; a third woman kneels, a helmet in her hand.
NEWS
November 12, 1993 | MARK BOUSIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a sun-lit ceremony that mixed tears, smiles and speeches, the Vietnam Women's Memorial was unveiled Thursday as the United States symbolically welcomed home its female veterans. "The journey for most of us still isn't over," said Diane Carlson Evans, a former army nurse and Vietnam veteran who led a 10-year campaign to create the monument. "Many are just beginning their healing. But this is our place to start."
NEWS
July 30, 1993 | From Associated Press
Gen. Colin L. Powell, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, helped break ground Thursday for the Vietnam Women's Memorial and said it was "nine years in the making and more than 20 years in the needing." "When this monument is finished, it will be for all time a testament to a group of American women who made extraordinary sacrifice at an extraordinary time in our nation's history," he said. The ceremony was attended by members of Congress, former Defense Secretary Melvin R.
NEWS
December 31, 1992 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE
Santa Fe, N.M., sculptor Glenna Goodacre (View, April 29) is right on schedule with the seven-foot bronze she is producing for the Vietnam Women's Memorial in Washington. She's about a third of the way through the process of molding clay onto a steel framework. Goodacre's figurative design includes an Army nurse sitting on sandbags, cradling a wounded GI in her lap. A second woman stands nearby, scanning the sky for a medevac helicopter; a third woman kneels, a helmet in her hand.
NEWS
May 1, 1992
I am writing in response to Michael Haederle's article "For the Forgotten" (April 29) in which he discusses the much-needed Vietnam Women's Memorial by sculptor Glenna Goodacre. Had women's contributions to the war effort not been discounted and ignored in the first place, perhaps we wouldn't have to wait until the third memorial to highlight them. Perhaps if women were given proper credit for their work, they would not have to battle each time for recognition. JEHAN AGRAMA Beverly Hills
NEWS
April 29, 1992 | MICHAEL HAEDERLE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Prowling the winding, adobe-walled streets of town in her red luxury sports coupe, Glenna Goodacre is always on the lookout for potential models. "Did you see her?" Goodacre exclaims, peering into the rearview mirror at the receding image of a woman walking down the sidewalk. "I think I know where she works."
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