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Vietnamese Americans California

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BUSINESS
December 25, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citibank, the nation's largest bank, will soon begin a service for Vietnamese-Americans in California to transfer money directly for relatives living in Vietnam or for humanitarian purposes. The program, restricted to transfers of $300 per family every three months, is considered the first such service provided by a major U.S. bank since the end of the Vietnam War. The Citibank program is scheduled for introduction in Southern California next month.
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BUSINESS
December 25, 1991 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citibank, the nation's largest bank, will soon begin a service for Vietnamese-Americans in California to transfer money directly for relatives living in Vietnam or for humanitarian purposes. The program, restricted to transfers of $300 per family every three months, is considered the first such service provided by a major U.S. bank since the end of the Vietnam War. The Citibank program is scheduled for introduction in Southern California next month.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2008 | My-Thuan Tran, Times Staff Writer
Vietnamese Americans who came to the United States as political refugees are suffering from higher rates of mental health problems than non-Latino whites, an indication that many Vietnamese Americans are experiencing lingering effects from the Vietnam War, according to a UC Irvine Center for Health Care Policy study. In the first analysis of its kind for Vietnamese Americans in California, researchers found that Vietnamese Americans over 55 were twice as likely as whites to report needing mental health care, but were less likely to discuss such issues with their doctors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 21, 2007 | My-Thuan Tran, Times Staff Writer
Lan Nguyen had dreamed of owning a house since she immigrated to Southern California from Vietnam 11 years ago. But she and her husband could never scrounge up enough money for a down payment, spending most of their paychecks on rent for a cramped Garden Grove apartment. Now, Nguyen has moved to a suburb of this Gulf Coast city, where the 28-year-old owns a new four-bedroom house with a spacious game room and access to a pool with a water slide -- all for $200,000.
BUSINESS
May 12, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Citibank began a service Monday that allows Vietnamese-Americans in California to transfer money directly to relatives in Vietnam. The program, which restricts transfers to $300 for each family every three months, is the first such service provided by a major U.S. bank since the end of the Vietnam War.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2009 | My-Thuan Tran
Thirty-four years after tanks smashed through the gates of Saigon's Presidential Palace, marking a symbolic end to the Vietnam War, the bitter memories still burn among many of the refugees who live in Orange County's Little Saigon. As decades passed and the memories of war fade with many Americans, community leaders in the largest Vietnamese enclave in the United States want to remind a new generation of the suffering and hardship that took shape on a day they still call "Black Friday."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1989 | DAVID REYES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vietnamese-Americans from Orange County and elsewhere in Southern California will hold a rally Sunday in front of the British Consulate in Los Angeles to protest the forced deportation of Vietnamese refugees from Hong Kong to Vietnam, spokesmen in Orange County said Friday. Fifty-one refugees have been returned to Vietnam, but the deportations have been temporarily halted pending a debate on the issue to be held by the British House of Commons on Tuesday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
A 14-member delegation from California, including Irvine Mayor Larry Agran, has been granted permission by the Vietnamese government to travel to Vietnam on behalf of a refugee family reunification project. The trip, scheduled for next Thursday through April 11, is humanitarian and apolitical although delegates intend to discuss with Vietnamese officials and the U.S.
NEWS
May 21, 1991 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Want to figure out what American policy toward the Pacific Rim is these days? Good luck. You're probably going to need a score card and a calculator. Any effort to determine Washington's approach to Asia must reckon with the complex and delicate interplay among various American constituencies. Each of those constituencies is important, but none is so powerful that it can override the others.
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