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Vietnamese Boat People

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NEWS
October 14, 1990 | Reuters
A group of 128 Vietnamese boat people returned home voluntarily from Hong Kong Friday, a government spokesman said. The United Nations-sponsored program has sent 4,581 Vietnamese home, but 53,000 remain in the British territory.
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OPINION
January 30, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Almost on impulse, almost 35 years ago, Richard M. Walden and a friend rounded up six tons of relief supplies and a jet to ferry them to Vietnamese boat people in Malaysia. Thus was Operation California - now Operation USA - born. A Times headline soon called him the "charity buccaneer," a red-tape-slashing contrarian who fretted about the "international web of neglect," and who still has sharp words for relief efforts unmet and relief agencies that don't measure up. He has steadfast celebrity supporters, like Julie Andrews, but the advent of social media that let anyone text a few bucks to Lady Gaga's favorite charity in the middle of a concert has made things harder for brick-and-mortar charities like Operation USA. Walden soldiers on, boldly going where too many charity-come-latelies can only try to go. You began in 1979 as Operation California; now it's Operation USA. Our legal name is Operation California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1996
The curtain is coming down on the sad drama of the Vietnamese boat people, tens of thousands of families that fled across the Gulf of Thailand or the South China Sea to escape the imposition of Communist rule. For 20 years now, an ever diminishing number of these hapless refugees have lived in camps on foreign soil--in Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines and, in a second wave, Hong Kong.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 2004 | Mai Tran and Mary Curtius, Times Staff Writers
On the eve of the 29th anniversary of the fall of Saigon, the U.S. State Department detailed an agreement it reached this month with the Philippines to speed up resettlement of the last Vietnamese boat people.
OPINION
January 30, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Almost on impulse, almost 35 years ago, Richard M. Walden and a friend rounded up six tons of relief supplies and a jet to ferry them to Vietnamese boat people in Malaysia. Thus was Operation California - now Operation USA - born. A Times headline soon called him the "charity buccaneer," a red-tape-slashing contrarian who fretted about the "international web of neglect," and who still has sharp words for relief efforts unmet and relief agencies that don't measure up. He has steadfast celebrity supporters, like Julie Andrews, but the advent of social media that let anyone text a few bucks to Lady Gaga's favorite charity in the middle of a concert has made things harder for brick-and-mortar charities like Operation USA. Walden soldiers on, boldly going where too many charity-come-latelies can only try to go. You began in 1979 as Operation California; now it's Operation USA. Our legal name is Operation California.
NEWS
July 5, 1987 | From Reuters
At least 120 Vietnamese "boat people" have landed on the shores of Mindoro Island in the central Philippines, the Manila Chronicle said Friday.
NEWS
November 9, 1990 | Reuters
A group of 234 Vietnamese "boat people" returned home voluntarily from Hong Kong on Thursday under the U.N. refugee agency's repatriation program, a government spokesman said. The group was the 38th to leave under the plan launched by the Office of the U.N. High Commissioner for Refugees. A total of 5,133 Vietnamese boat people have been repatriated since the program began in March, 1989, but more than 53,000 remain in camps in Hong Kong.
NEWS
January 10, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Britain's enforced repatriation of Vietnamese boat people refused refugee status in Hong Kong will resume shortly despite U.S. opposition, government sources said today. British authorities hope that the move will deter another wave of boat people setting out for Hong Kong in February and March when sea conditions will permit a fresh exodus from Vietnam.
NEWS
November 5, 1986 | United Press International
Another 43 Vietnamese boat people landed today on the eastern coast of Malaysia, a news agency said. U.S. officials said the new arrivals pushed the total to more than 1,500 in just a month.
NEWS
October 30, 1985 | United Press International
Crewmen aboard a West German cargo ship plucked 110 Vietnamese "boat people" from a sailboat in danger of sinking in the South China Sea and ferried them to the Philippines, officials here said Tuesday. One refugee said that 10 passing ships had ignored their calls for help. Capt.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 19, 1996 | JOHN POPE
Angrily tossing into a box bags of rice, noodles and other food products made in Thailand, about 100 Vietnamese Americans on Wednesday called for a boycott of Thai goods in protest of alleged brutality against Vietnamese refugees. The event was organized by Project Ngoc, a Vietnamese refugees support group based at UC Irvine. According to the group, about 2,300 Vietnamese refugees, or "boat people," remain in Thai detention camps awaiting repatriation to Vietnam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 25, 1996
The curtain is coming down on the sad drama of the Vietnamese boat people, tens of thousands of families that fled across the Gulf of Thailand or the South China Sea to escape the imposition of Communist rule. For 20 years now, an ever diminishing number of these hapless refugees have lived in camps on foreign soil--in Malaysia, Thailand, Indonesia, the Philippines and, in a second wave, Hong Kong.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 20, 1994 | NANCY HSU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Five months ago, Sang Nguyen was almost forced back to a homeland where he is no longer welcome. Saturday, Nguyen, who now works for the American legal group that helped him avoid forced repatriation to Vietnam, joined thousands of others hoping to aid boat people still in the detention camps he escaped. More than 4,000 people gathered in Mile Square Regional Park for their fourth annual walkathon fund-raiser to benefit the Vietnamese boat people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 1994 | THAO HUA
About 5,000 people are expected to participate in a 10-kilometer walk Saturday to help raise money for Vietnamese boat people, organizers said. The fourth annual Walk-a-Thon starts at 9 a.m. at Warner Avenue and Euclid Street in Mile Square Regional Park in Fountain Valley. Organizers said they hope to raise more than $100,000 from the event. The money will be used to hire attorneys, legal assistants and interpreters to help refugees in camps in Southeast Asia avoid repatriation to Vietnam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1994 | BERT ELJERA
A Vietnamese American organization will hold simultaneous walks in three cities Nov. 19 to raise awareness about the plight of Vietnamese boat people still languishing in refugee camps in Southeast Asia. In addition, the 10-kilometer walkathons in San Jose, Houston and Fountain Valley will raise money for the refugees, according to Van T. Tran, spokesman for LAVAS, Legal Assistance for Vietnamese Asylum Seekers.
NEWS
July 19, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After nearly 20 years of poignant drama on the high seas, the saga of Vietnam's "boat people" appeared to be heading for a neat, quiet solution. Departures from Vietnam, which reached tens of thousands a year in the 1980s, had been reduced to a trickle. Hong Kong recorded 20,179 arriving Vietnamese boat people in 1991, but only 94 last year.
NEWS
June 16, 1990 | From United Press International
More than 8,500 Vietnamese "boat people" have been turned away from Malaysian shores despite a pledge by the country to offer the refugees asylum, international observers said Friday. The officials said they fear the practice of turning away the Vietnamese, called boat people because they flee Vietnam in boats, could spread the growing refugee problem to other parts of the Pacific.
NEWS
August 16, 1989 | From Times wire services
Vietnamese boat people were rescued by the U.S. Navy vessel whose former captain was punished for not picking up refugees who later resorted to cannibalizing dead shipmates, officials said today. A U.S. Embassy official said the Dubuque, an amphibious transport ship, brought 30 Vietnamese into Singapore on Monday after rescuing them from a wooden boat in the South China Sea early Sunday. The Dubuque, now commanded by Capt. D. L.
NEWS
April 26, 1994 | BERT ELJERA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Ngo Van Ha is a 16-year-old orphan who speaks little English. But today he will testify before a congressional subcommittee, and what he has to say may influence national policy on the estimated 50,000 Vietnamese boat people still languishing in refugee camps in Hong Kong and Southeast Asia. Local refugee rights activists say the frail teen-ager, barely five feet tall, personalizes what they describe as a continuing tragedy.
NEWS
May 23, 1992 | From Reuters
Thousands of Vietnamese boat people protested for the fifth consecutive day in Hong Kong camps Friday against plans to deport them to Vietnam, a government spokesman said. More than 8,000 Vietnamese hoisted banners and put up posters in peaceful demonstrations at three camps, including Hong Kong's largest one at Whitehead, he said. The protests followed a riot at the Tai A Chau camp Thursday night that was triggered by the arrest of what police called four drunken troublemakers.
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