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March 24, 1990 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The editor of one of the largest Vietnamese-language newspapers in the United States has received a death threat from a right-wing group. The typewritten communique accuses editor Yen Ngoc Do and several other prominent Vietnamese-Americans of unspecified pro-Communist activities. It threatens to execute them on April 30, the 15th anniversary of the fall of Saigon, unless they stop their activities.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1991 | From Associated Press
The bodies of a woman and her young son were discovered in an apartment here after her boyfriend drove nearly 400 miles to Garden Grove and reported he had found them dead, officials said. The boyfriend, Khanh Quoc La, 26, of Garden Grove, told police he drove to San Jose because he was worried about his girlfriend, who was not answering the phone. When La arrived at her apartment, he let himself in with a key and found the bodies, he told police.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 9, 1991 | From Associated Press
The bodies of a woman and her young son were discovered in an apartment here after her boyfriend drove nearly 400 miles to Garden Grove and reported he had found them dead, officials said. The boyfriend, Khanh Quoc La, 26, of Garden Grove, told police he drove to San Jose because he was worried about his girlfriend, who was not answering the phone. When La arrived at her apartment, he let himself in with a key and found the bodies, he told police.
NEWS
March 24, 1990 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The editor of one of the largest Vietnamese-language newspapers in the United States has received a death threat from a right-wing group. The typewritten communique accuses editor Yen Ngoc Do and several other prominent Vietnamese-Americans of unspecified pro-Communist activities. It threatens to execute them on April 30, the 15th anniversary of the fall of Saigon, unless they stop their activities.
NEWS
August 3, 1988
A group of Vietnamese-Americans occupying a Roman Catholic church in San Jose settled their lawsuit against the local diocese, agreeing to purchase the building and turn it into a cultural center. The dissidents took over the property in 1986, when the Rev. Paul Luu Dinh Duong was appointed pastor of a temporary mission for Vietnamese-Americans that was housed in the church.
NEWS
June 4, 1987 | United Press International
Assemblyman Tom Hayden's commencement speech at San Jose City College has been canceled because officials fear violent protests by local Vietnamese, it was announced Wednesday. The former anti-war activist, now a Democratic assemblyman from Santa Monica, had been scheduled to address the graduation exercises Friday evening at a school where about 40% of the 190 students expected to show up to receive their diplomas are Vietnamese.
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON and DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writers
Like many Vietnamese refugees who speak of peace with Hanoi, Doan Van Toai had become a target of mounting wrath among those in immigrant Vietnamese communities who condemn such talk as nothing short of high treason. Recently, Toai became the target of much more than threats. Two Asian men gunned down the internationally known writer in broad daylight as he walked on a busy residential street two blocks from his Fresno home. Toai survived the shooting.
NEWS
June 5, 1987 | RICHARD C. PADDOCK, Times Staff Writer
Assemblyman Tom Hayden, replaced as a college commencement speaker in San Jose because of threats of violence, charged Thursday that Vietnamese protests against him were prompted by "a handful of former Saigon police and Saigon army people who corrupted their country" and then "regrouped in San Jose." The Santa Monica Democrat and former anti-Vietnam War radical, who still is criticized for his wartime trip to Hanoi to protest U.S.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire reports
An internationally known Vietnamese writer who sympathized with the Communists before the fall of South Vietnam but later was imprisoned by the North Vietnamese was shot and seriously injured here Saturday while walking along a residential street near his home, a Sheriff's Department spokesman said. Sheriff's Sgt. Oliver Moon said witnesses reported that Doan Van Toai was wounded from shots fired at 9 a.m. by two Asian men in a "dirty" brown Pontiac station wagon.
NEWS
October 17, 1989 | From Associated Press
A federal judge on Monday allowed the Coast Guard to resume enforcing a 200-year-old citizenship requirement against Vietnamese owners and pilots of commercial fishing boats in U.S. waters. U.S. District Judge William Schwarzer said he had reluctantly concluded that a group of legal resident aliens from Vietnam, who obtained a restraining order against the law Sept. 27, had no chance of ultimately proving it unconstitutional. "They have been poaching," he said.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | SUZETTE PARMLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, the billboard in San Francisco's downtown featuring a young, denim-clad Vietnamese man with a cigarette dangling from his mouth may look like just another smoking ad aiming to entice. But a double take at the brand name of the cigarette pack the model holds shows the universal symbol of death: a skull and crossbones. And in Vietnamese, the billboard reads: "You wouldn't want your friend to get cancer--so why offer him a cigarette?"
NEWS
October 17, 1989 | From Associated Press
A federal judge on Monday allowed the Coast Guard to resume enforcing a 200-year-old citizenship requirement against Vietnamese owners and pilots of commercial fishing boats in U.S. waters. U.S. District Judge William Schwarzer said he had reluctantly concluded that a group of legal resident aliens from Vietnam, who obtained a restraining order against the law Sept. 27, had no chance of ultimately proving it unconstitutional. "They have been poaching," he said.
NEWS
August 27, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON and DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writers
Like many Vietnamese refugees who speak of peace with Hanoi, Doan Van Toai had become a target of mounting wrath among those in immigrant Vietnamese communities who condemn such talk as nothing short of high treason. Recently, Toai became the target of much more than threats. Two Asian men gunned down the internationally known writer in broad daylight as he walked on a busy residential street two blocks from his Fresno home. Toai survived the shooting.
NEWS
August 22, 1989 | TRACY WILKINSON, Times Staff Writer
Sheriff's investigators backed by the FBI Monday focused on a political motive for the shooting of internationally known Vietnamese writer Doan Van Toai, a man whose views have angered people of both ideological extremes. Toai, in serious but stable condition at a Fresno hospital, underwent additional surgery Monday for reconstruction of his jaw. He was shot three times--once in the face and twice in the torso--Saturday morning as he walked home from a shopping center.
NEWS
August 20, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire reports
An internationally known Vietnamese writer who sympathized with the Communists before the fall of South Vietnam but later was imprisoned by the North Vietnamese was shot and seriously injured here Saturday while walking along a residential street near his home, a Sheriff's Department spokesman said. Sheriff's Sgt. Oliver Moon said witnesses reported that Doan Van Toai was wounded from shots fired at 9 a.m. by two Asian men in a "dirty" brown Pontiac station wagon.
NEWS
August 3, 1988
A group of Vietnamese-Americans occupying a Roman Catholic church in San Jose settled their lawsuit against the local diocese, agreeing to purchase the building and turn it into a cultural center. The dissidents took over the property in 1986, when the Rev. Paul Luu Dinh Duong was appointed pastor of a temporary mission for Vietnamese-Americans that was housed in the church.
NEWS
June 19, 1988
A delegation of about 100 dissident Vietnamese Catholics has left San Jose for the Vatican where they will ask the Pope to intervene in a bitter dispute that has divided local church members. The dissidents say their San Jose mission should be upgraded to a parish so they can worship in their own language and culture. At present, the group is refusing to accept the Rev. Paul Luu Dinh Duong as pastor of their 8,000-member Vietnamese Catholic community. Duong succeeded the Rev.
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