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June 4, 1991 | Reuters
More than 100 women from a northern rural province in Vietnam were sold into slavery and sent across the border to China during the first five months of this year, an official newspaper said Monday. "There has been a rise in Hai Hung of the crime of luring women to the border, then selling them to foreigners," the weekly Dai Doan Ket (Great Solidarity) reported. It said that 52 people, including some state employees, are under investigation for possible involvement in the slave trade.
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NEWS
June 4, 1991 | Reuters
More than 100 women from a northern rural province in Vietnam were sold into slavery and sent across the border to China during the first five months of this year, an official newspaper said Monday. "There has been a rise in Hai Hung of the crime of luring women to the border, then selling them to foreigners," the weekly Dai Doan Ket (Great Solidarity) reported. It said that 52 people, including some state employees, are under investigation for possible involvement in the slave trade.
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NEWS
March 10, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ngo Van Hai, a worker at a U.S. air base during the Vietnam War, waited 15 years after the fall of Saigon before making his escape. He suffered much during those years. Unable to get a steady job, he survived, he said, by teaching English as a private tutor. But the wait had advantages, too. When he saw his chance to flee, he did not take a perilous sea voyage like so many "boat people" who have gambled their lives for the chance at freedom. Hai took the train and bus.
NEWS
March 10, 1991 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ngo Van Hai, a worker at a U.S. air base during the Vietnam War, waited 15 years after the fall of Saigon before making his escape. He suffered much during those years. Unable to get a steady job, he survived, he said, by teaching English as a private tutor. But the wait had advantages, too. When he saw his chance to flee, he did not take a perilous sea voyage like so many "boat people" who have gambled their lives for the chance at freedom. Hai took the train and bus.
NEWS
June 3, 1985
Vietnamese armed forces and civilians killed 288 Chinese troops who crossed the Sino-Vietnamese border, Hanoi radio reported. The broadcast, monitored in Bangkok, said the Chinese conducted 12 "land-grabbing operations" after firing nearly 50,000 artillery rounds in northern Ha Tuyen province but were repulsed by the Vietnamese. China and Vietnam fought a brief border war in the same area in early 1979.
NEWS
January 8, 1987 | JIM MANN, Times Staff Writer
The Chinese government Wednesday confirmed reports from Hanoi that new fighting has broken out along the Sino-Vietnamese border, with both sides reporting casualty levels among the highest since they fought a monthlong war in 1979. The official New China News Agency said the fighting began Monday morning on the border near Laoshan, in the Chinese province of Yunnan. It said that at the time of the report--Wednesday night Peking time--the fighting was still going on.
NEWS
May 16, 1989 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, Times Staff Writer
At a news conference here recently, Cambodian Premier Hun Sen held up a drawing of a flag that had been hastily scrawled in red, blue and yellow crayon. It was the new flag of Cambodia, Hun Sen said, and its design had been agreed to in talks between his government and Prince Norodom Sihanouk, the former Cambodian head of state who now leads a three-party coalition in opposition to the government in Phnom Penh. Despite the theatrical overtones, the talks were not about color schemes but evidence of a remarkable transformation in the political climate in Indochina.
OPINION
January 12, 2007 | ROSA BROOKS
IF YOU THINK the growing similarity between Iraq and Vietnam is tragic but inadvertent, you're not being cynical enough. During the first years of the Iraq war, any resemblance to Vietnam was the result of the Bush administration's disastrous miscalculations. But today, the Iraq war is looking more and more like the Vietnam War because that's exactly what suits the White House.
NEWS
December 4, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
Chinese Foreign Minister Qian Qichen said here Saturday that preparations will begin shortly for the first Sino-Soviet summit in 30 years, although the two countries still have differences over Cambodia and other crucial issues. Qian said that his visit, the first by a Chinese foreign minister to Moscow since 1957, would "initiate the process of normalization between the two countries" after years of rivalry, hostility and even armed clashes along their border.
OPINION
January 8, 1989 | Frederick Z. Brown and Robert A. Manning, Frederick Z. Brown is a senior associate at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. Robert A. Manning, former diplomatic correspondent for U.S. News & World Report, is the author of "Asian Policy: The New Soviet Challenge in the Pacific" (20th Century Fund).
Can a mix of international cooperation, great power diplomacy and well-crafted political constraints prevent yet another Cambodian tragedy? The departure of about 50,000 Vietnamese troops from Cambodia gives this question new urgency.
MAGAZINE
January 5, 1986 | DAVID DeVOSS, Staff writer David DeVoss, was a correspondent in Vietnam and has made seven trips to Ho Chi Minh City since the end of the war
After four years of "re-education," 17 months in a refugee camp, a 16-hour flight across the Pacific and a two-hour slog through immigration at Los Angeles International Airport, Lien Phuoc finally clasps the hands of his two dazed children and leads them cautiously through the pneumatic door into a new life.
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