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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 1992 | LANIE JONES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To the staccato of fireworks, five fierce-looking dragons danced onto the central lawn at Golden West College, ushering in the celebration of the Vietnamese New Year. As about 5,000 people watched, the dragons--actually pairs of red-sashed dancers, one to hold a dragon's large head, another to move its bright cloth tail--dipped and swayed menacingly, working to chase away bad spirits and ensure prosperity in this, the Year of the Monkey.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2013 | By Anh Do, Los Angeles Times
In a conservative Orange County town, where the strawberry fields were still plentiful and the population solidly white, Danh's Pharmacy stood out when it opened its doors after the Vietnam War came to an end. Yet the business was just the beginning in a small Orange County city that would quickly balloon into a bustling immigrant community. When Danh N. Quach chose to set up shop in 1978 in Westminster, he knew just one Vietnamese doctor - the same man who agreed to co-sign a loan for him. PHOTOS: Little Saigon turns 25 Now, as Little Saigon celebrates its 25th anniversary - a date marked not by the arrival of refugees, but by the state erecting a freeway offramp sign - Quach's shop stands as a landmark in the largest Vietnamese cultural district outside the country itself.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 17, 1996 | SARAH KLEIN
Though the young men had a distinct disco rhythm and the emcee used the word "like" and "buff" to describe the dancers, the troupe performing a Vietnamese dragon dance for Heritage Elementary School students succeeded in conveying the joyful spirit of the Tet holiday. Performances this week marked the third year in a row that Los Amigos High School students from the Asian Student Union have brought their lunar new year celebration to Heritage.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2011 | By Katherine Tulich, Special to the Los Angeles Times
This weekend is party time and not just because it's Super Bowl weekend. For Southern California's many Asian communities, it's the annual celebration of the Lunar New Year. While L.A.'s Chinatown has long been the focus of New Year celebrations, newer Asian communities are also forging their identities with their own unique celebrations. For the Vietnamese community, it's the Year of the Cat (the Chinese are celebrating the Year of the Rabbit), and in Garden Grove the Vietnamese community will hold its annual three-day Tet festival (full name, Tet Nguyen Dan, which translates to "Feast of the First Morning")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 11, 1996
Each fall, a sprawling bed of lotus plants in Echo Park Lake is cut down to below the surface of the water. "The water is really yucky and mucky and disgusting and gross," said Maile Marquand, "but in the spring, up come these beautiful green leaves and in June, July and August you get absolutely beautiful lotus flowers." In celebration of the blooming of the elegant flowers, Marquand is coordinating a free festival this weekend in Echo Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1993 | DAVID A. AVILA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the dragons swirled and pranced near tiny Terry Nguyen, 3, she screamed and ran for cover while her mother tried to catch her. This was her first experience with the Vietnamese Moon Festival, a two-day event that will continue today at Garden Grove Park. "It is great," said Quong Quang, 20, who with four friends came to experience the festivities. More than 4,000 people had attended by mid-day Saturday despite the heat.
NEWS
January 28, 1993 | SHEARLEAN DUKE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In a first-grade classroom, children learn to use chopsticks, while outside on the playground, second-graders practice a traditional Vietnamese dance. In the multipurpose room, three fifth-grade boys don a dragon costume and prance to the beat of a drum. Peek in any class at Fryberger Elementary School and you'll see children celebrating Tet--the Vietnamese Lunar New Year.
NEWS
December 12, 1989 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At 16, the Vietnamese-American girl who calls herself "Tomboy" is wanted for burglary. She has dyed amber hair, a knife-cut tattoo on her forearm that says "I Love Tuan," and a way of hunching her shoulders that tells adults to drop dead. She sits in silent fury, under arrest, in a lawn chair outside a Garden Grove motel room packed with 16 Vietnamese-American teen-agers.
NEWS
October 20, 1987 | DAVID DEVOSS
Two miles west of Downtown Los Angeles, in an ethnically mixed neighborhood on the edge of Koreatown, stands an old apartment building whose prosaic exterior belies its religious significance to thousands of Vietnamese refugees. It is the Chua Viet-Nam, a Buddhist temple and the main center of Vietnamese culture for the half of the 170,000 Vietnamese living in Los Angeles and Orange counties who are Buddhist.
NEWS
December 1, 1989 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A 15-year-old Garden Grove honors student whose newborn baby drowned in a high school restroom toilet will not be charged with murder, authorities said. The Santiago High School sophomore remained hospitalized in good condition. Orange County Deputy Dist. Atty. John Conley said prosecutors have not decided whether to press involuntary manslaughter or child endangerment charges, or bring no charges at all. An autopsy showed the baby boy was apparently delivered into the toilet, where he drowned.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 2004 | Daniel Yi, Times Staff Writer
The Garden Grove City Council has rescinded support for a large-scale Vietnamese cultural center near City Hall but will continue to work with the project's proponents to find a home within the city. The council, acting as the city's redevelopment agency, voted unanimously Tuesday to continue the search for a location that can accommodate the proposed three-acre complex. The center would include a museum, library and conference rooms.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 5, 2004 | Mai Tran, Times Staff Writer
Garden Grove officials have given preliminary approval to plans for a $10-million Vietnamese cultural center along Garden Grove Boulevard despite the objections of Korean American leaders who say the project is too close to their local cultural hub. The 3-acre parcel at Garden Grove Boulevard and 7th Street could become home to a proposed 80,000-square-foot Vietnamese cultural center that will include a library, a heritage memorial, a museum, a performing art center and conference rooms.
NEWS
May 26, 2002 | VIVIAN LETRAN and SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bach Van Nguyen, 92, has reconciled himself to his loneliness. His wife is dead and the mistress who once came between them is gone. He doesn't get along with his adult children in Florida and rarely speaks to them. His most constant companion is a plastic yellow bird, bought for $8, that chirps at the sound of his voice in a nearly empty Garden Grove studio apartment. "The bird likes to talk to me," Nguyen says gleefully.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2001 | MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lan Khanh Duong flew in from Australia to help clean her aunt's kitchen in Irvine. Duong swiftly scrubbed the sinks and swept every nook and corner before the clock struck midnight one night during the week preceding the lunar New Year. "Tet is all about spending time with family, no matter what we're doing together," said Duong, 22, who made a rare visit from Sydney to celebrate the holiday, which falls on Wednesday. "We bond now so the family remains close throughout the year."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2001 | MIKE ANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At Westminster's Tet celebration Saturday, you could eat spring rolls and dried squid washed down with pearl milk tea. Or munch on nachos and Indian fry bread with a power drink on the side. You could buy good luck wall hangings written in Vietnamese, decorative fans and Asian compact discs. Or pick up some wood shutters, auto parts and a Roth IRA.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2001 | MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lan Khanh Duong flew in from Australia to help clean her aunt's kitchen in Irvine. "Tet is all about spending time with family no matter what we're doing together," said Duong, 22, who made a rare visit from Sydney to celebrate the Vietnamese lunar New Year, which falls on Wednesday. "We bond now so the family remains close throughout the year."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 9, 1993 | ANDREA HEIMAN
When Dieu D. Le came to Little Saigon from Vietnam, he quickly realized something was missing from among the Vietnamese restaurants, shops and markets. Vietnamese artists, musicians and writers had virtually no outlet. So in 1991 Le founded the Vietnamese American Arts and Letters Assn. and last year he opened a gallery off Bolsa Avenue specifically for Vietnamese artists. It has also become a venue for concerts, poetry readings, recitals and book signings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 3, 1996 | JOHN POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A developer has abandoned plans for a Harmony Bridge in Orange County's Little Saigon amid complaints from residents who said the planned link between the community's two main shopping hubs did not accurately represent Vietnamese culture. "The controversy created by a few members of the Vietnamese community has discouraged us from moving forward," developer Frank Jao said Tuesday of the project he was heading with six other property owners. "It's dead in our hearts, and in our plans," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2000 | CATHY PASCUAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lack of knowledge about the Pap smear and cultural myths about cancer are costing Vietnamese American women their lives, experts say. Vietnamese Americans have the highest cervical cancer rate (43 cases per 100,000) of all ethnic groups. The number is 5.7 times that of non-Latino whites and 7 1/2 times that of Japanese Americans, who have the lowest rate (5.8 cases per 100,000), according to the National Cancer Institute.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2000 | MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ho Van Nguyen knelt Sunday in the Buddhist temple and gave a silver tray stacked with figurines and cookies to her 82-year-old grandfather. His stern face broke into a smile. Then tears streamed down his face. "I'm honoring my grandparents because they raised my parents," said 20-year-old Nguyen, of Westminster. Her parents were working Sunday and unable to attend the packed services at Duoc Su Temple in Garden Grove.
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