Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVietnamese Education
IN THE NEWS

Vietnamese Education

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | STEVE EMMONS and DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writers
Orange County's Vietnamese community--one of the largest outside Southeast Asia--sees gangs and crime as its worst problems and assistance in learning English as its greatest need. A sampling of the county's estimated 100,000 Vietnamese residents suggests that nearly two-thirds of them perceive at least some anti-Vietnamese prejudice here, although most say that they have not experienced it personally.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2010 | By My-Thuan Tran, Los Angeles Times
The last time Daniel Dien Luong saw his father was through the fence of a former army barracks in southern Vietnam more than 30 years ago. His father was being held prisoner by the Communist government, which had arrested thousands of former military personnel to be "re-educated" after the Vietnam War. The 13-year-old rode his bike two hours to visit his father every Saturday afternoon at 1 p.m. They waved at each other from afar as armed...
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1990 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For four years, Hau Nguyen was imprisoned in Vietnamese re-education camps. On a diet of only three ears of corn a day, the former South Vietnamese army captain was forced to hike 10 miles into the jungle, chop trees into 14-foot sections and drag them back to be sold by the Communists for firewood.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2006 | Christian Berthelsen and Mai Tran, Times Staff Writers
Trustees of the troubled Westminster School District left students, teachers and parents baffled Wednesday by withdrawing a job offer to a superintendent seven days after it voted to hire her. With little explanation, the board voted Tuesday night to rescind a decision to hire KimOanh Nguyen-Lam, who many think would have been the first Vietnamese American superintendent in Orange County. Two board members who had voted to hire Nguyen-Lam changed sides to revoke the offer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2001 | THUY-DOAN LE and DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An Orange County Vietnamese refugee is under investigation by federal immigration officials for allegedly committing atrocities against fellow prisoners at a communist "re-education" camp more than two decades ago, including beating a man to death. The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service began the investigation last year after several survivors of the Thanh Cam prison camp near Hanoi identified Thi Dinh Bui of Garden Grove as one of the camp's brutal enforcers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 2006 | Christian Berthelsen and Mai Tran, Times Staff Writers
Trustees of the troubled Westminster School District left students, teachers and parents baffled Wednesday by withdrawing a job offer to a superintendent seven days after it voted to hire her. With little explanation, the board voted Tuesday night to rescind a decision to hire KimOanh Nguyen-Lam, who many think would have been the first Vietnamese American superintendent in Orange County. Two board members who had voted to hire Nguyen-Lam changed sides to revoke the offer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 2010 | By My-Thuan Tran, Los Angeles Times
The last time Daniel Dien Luong saw his father was through the fence of a former army barracks in southern Vietnam more than 30 years ago. His father was being held prisoner by the Communist government, which had arrested thousands of former military personnel to be "re-educated" after the Vietnam War. The 13-year-old rode his bike two hours to visit his father every Saturday afternoon at 1 p.m. They waved at each other from afar as armed...
NEWS
October 30, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The highest level U.S.-Vietnam talks in two years concluded today with agreement to expand efforts to resolve the fates of American servicemen missing in Vietnam, Radio Hanoi reported. The radio said Gen. John W. Vessey, the U.S. presidential envoy, met Deputy Prime Minister Nguyen Co Thach for "constructive" talks that included plans to resettle former Vietnamese re-education camp prisoners in the United States and the situation in Cambodia--the last obstacle to improved U.S.
NEWS
January 5, 1990 | From Times wire services
After many years of internment and waiting, the first group of former Vietnamese "re-education camp" inmates allowed to resettle in the United States arrived in the Thai capital today. A total of 156 inmates and their families arrived on morning and afternoon charter flights from Ho Chi Minh City, a U.S. Embassy spokesman said. Many will go to California after a week in a Thai immigration facility.
NEWS
December 26, 1988 | NICK B. WILLIAMS Jr., Times Staff Writer
Down the hall, a chorus of Vietnamese voices ran the scales and a prize-winning accordionist was pumping a mazurka in the adjoining studio, but 7-year-old Dao Thuy Linh was all concentration. Under the watchful eye of her teacher, Linh's nimble fingers picked out a traditional Vietnamese tune on a 16-string instrument. Finishing without a flub, she beamed as her classmates, crowded into the doorway, broke into applause.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 12, 2001 | THUY-DOAN LE and DANIEL YI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
An Orange County Vietnamese refugee is under investigation by federal immigration officials for allegedly committing atrocities against fellow prisoners at a communist "re-education" camp more than two decades ago, including beating a man to death. The U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service began the investigation last year after several survivors of the Thanh Cam prison camp near Hanoi identified Thi Dinh Bui of Garden Grove as one of the camp's brutal enforcers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 1990 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For four years, Hau Nguyen was imprisoned in Vietnamese re-education camps. On a diet of only three ears of corn a day, the former South Vietnamese army captain was forced to hike 10 miles into the jungle, chop trees into 14-foot sections and drag them back to be sold by the Communists for firewood.
NEWS
February 5, 1989 | STEVE EMMONS and DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writers
Orange County's Vietnamese community--one of the largest outside Southeast Asia--sees gangs and crime as its worst problems and assistance in learning English as its greatest need. A sampling of the county's estimated 100,000 Vietnamese residents suggests that nearly two-thirds of them perceive at least some anti-Vietnamese prejudice here, although most say that they have not experienced it personally.
NEWS
March 19, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In another of its ongoing breaks from the past, Vietnam has chosen English over French and Russian as the favored foreign language for students to learn and has turned to its former ideological enemies in the West to help redesign the educational curriculum. Vietnam is already phasing out English-language textbooks written by Russian advisors in the mid-1980s.
NEWS
August 1, 1989 | CHRIS WOODYARD and DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writers
An agreement that would free thousands of former Vietnamese prisoners to emigrate to the United States was hailed in Orange County Monday as "a major breakthrough," and one that could mean reunification of many families in the largest Vietnamese community in the nation. "Yes, this is good news because we have been waiting for so long," said Nhu Hao T. Duong, executive director for the Community Resources Opportunity Project in Santa Ana. "To us, this is a major breakthrough."
Los Angeles Times Articles
|