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Vietnamese Hong Kong

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October 30, 1991 | CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Britain and Vietnam signed an accord in Hanoi to repatriate from Hong Kong all Vietnamese "boat people" who are found not to be political refugees, Alistair Asprey, Hong Kong's secretary for security, said Tuesday. "This understanding brings into effect an orderly return program, which will apply initially to all new arrivals found to be illegal immigrants, and then subsequently to all other Vietnamese illegal immigrants already in (Hong Kong) detention centers," he said.
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NEWS
June 1, 2000 | Associated Press
Authorities closed Hong Kong's last Vietnamese refugee camp Wednesday, ending the quarter-century boat people saga in the Chinese territory and leaving more than 100 people homeless. At midnight, security guards marched out of the remote camp at Pillar Point before officials pulled the front gate shut and hung a sign announcing its permanent closure.
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NEWS
November 10, 1991 | CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Above a high steel wall topped with barbed wire surrounding the 25,616 Vietnamese "boat people" at Whitehead detention center here, black letters on a fluttering white flag sent a message to the world: "SOS." A sense of desperation is growing and tensions have run high since an Oct. 29 agreement between Britain and Vietnam providing for the forced repatriation of all Vietnamese in Hong Kong who are found not to be political refugees.
NEWS
May 10, 1996 | MAGGIE FARLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a desperate attempt to avoid being forced to return to their native land, as many as 200 Vietnamese asylum-seekers broke out of a Hong Kong detention center early today and fled into the hills after setting some of the camp's buildings on fire. The well-organized escape began before dawn as groups of migrants, mostly men, cut at least six holes in the wire-mesh fences, police said.
NEWS
November 25, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
About 500 people held a noisy but peaceful demonstration in Orange County's Little Saigon to protest the forced repatriation of Vietnamese refugees in Hong Kong. The marchers, mostly local Vietnamese-Americans, waved placards and banners denouncing a recent agreement between British authorities in Hong Kong and the Communist Vietnamese government. The Oct. 29 agreement provides for the forced repatriation of all Vietnamese in Hong Kong who are found to be economic rather than political
NEWS
May 13, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
After months of political and financial wrangling, Britain and Vietnam completed an agreement that could force thousands of Vietnamese boat people out of Hong Kong and back to their Communist homeland. The agreement, signed in Hanoi, fleshes out a skeletal pact signed Oct. 29 allowing Hong Kong to deport boat people not granted refugee status. After the October agreement, which applied only to recent arrivals, Hong Kong deported 123 Vietnamese. Now Hong Kong can expel 22,466.
NEWS
January 18, 1990 | United Press International
U.N. officials said Wednesday that a meeting on the problem of Vietnamese "boat people" in Hong Kong will be held in Geneva next Tuesday and Wednesday after several postponements. The talks among the countries most involved were organized by the U.N. high commissioner for refugees, Thorvajd Stoltenberg of Norway. An international conference last year agreed that there should be no forced repatriation of boat people.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1991 | ERIC YOUNG
About 500 people held a noisy but peaceful demonstration in Westminster's Little Saigon on Sunday to protest the forced repatriation of Vietnamese refugees in Hong Kong. The marchers, mostly Vietnamese-Americans from Orange County, waved placards and banners denouncing a recent agreement between British authorities in Hong Kong and the Communist Vietnamese government. The Oct.
NEWS
September 3, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
It started last Sunday morning over 85 grams of rice, the daily ration for each of the 5,500 Vietnamese "boat people" already suffering from malnutrition and disease at one of Hong Kong's refugee detention camps on an island called Tai A Chau. When it ended Monday afternoon in an assault on the island by police helicopters, gunboats and 350 anti-riot police, the Hong Kong media had dubbed it "24 Hours of Terror."
NEWS
December 10, 1991 | CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Hong Kong government forced 28 more Vietnamese boat people, including 12 new arrivals denied refugee status, to return to their Communist homeland today. It was the second such operation since Britain and Vietnam signed a deal on Oct. 29 to forcibly return all boat people found not to be political refugees. A similar operation two years ago caused an international outcry.
NEWS
May 9, 1996 | From Reuters
Authorities transferred 549 Vietnamese refugees to a Hong Kong prison Wednesday pending deportation, denying allegations that the jail would be dangerously overcrowded. "The management of Victoria Prison can actually comfortably accommodate that," Dickie Chan, chief superintendent for prisons, told government radio. "For example, if a cell usually has one fiberglass bed, in order to accommodate them, we will put a double-tier bunk there."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 23, 1995 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hundreds of placard-toting Vietnamese Americans from Orange County marched at the British Consulate General's office here Monday, demanding humane treatment for Vietnamese refugees in Hong Kong following a weekend clash. On Friday, a 13-hour struggle broke out when 1,500 refugees from the Whitehead Detention Center were transferred to High Island, apparently in preparation for their repatriation, said Angus Mackay, spokesman for the British Consulate General.
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | CHRISTINE COURTNEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
As efforts to repatriate thousands of Vietnamese "boat people" to their homeland reach a critical phase, the U.N. refugee agency in Hong Kong is facing a new wave of criticism.
NEWS
April 8, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hong Kong deported 57 Vietnamese to Hanoi under its program of forced repatriation of "boat people" denied refugee status. Refugee Coordinator Brian Bresnihan said a flight carrying 52 women, four boys and one girl left without incident. It was the 10th flight since Britain and Vietnam signed an agreement in 1991 allowing the deportations and brought the total of Vietnamese sent home involuntarily since then to 513.
NEWS
May 13, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
After months of political and financial wrangling, Britain and Vietnam completed an agreement that could force thousands of Vietnamese boat people out of Hong Kong and back to their Communist homeland. The agreement, signed in Hanoi, fleshes out a skeletal pact signed Oct. 29 allowing Hong Kong to deport boat people not granted refugee status. After the October agreement, which applied only to recent arrivals, Hong Kong deported 123 Vietnamese. Now Hong Kong can expel 22,466.
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Recent violence in a Vietnamese refugee camp in Hong Kong, rather than fostering outside sympathy for the detainees' hopes of resettlement abroad, is intensifying the determination of authorities to send most "boat people" back to Vietnam. Robert van Leeuwen, the top U.N.
NEWS
February 18, 1990 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Judging by the experience of Le Van Kim, the thousands of Vietnamese "boat people" who face forced repatriation from Hong Kong will encounter no official retribution when they return home, but a life of enduring adversity. In contrast, when Nguyen Ngoc Son returned voluntarily to Haiphong last month from a camp in Hong Kong, he had to cope with little more, by his own account, than a wife embittered by his infidelity. His adjustment problems have been negligible.
NEWS
June 1, 2000 | Associated Press
Authorities closed Hong Kong's last Vietnamese refugee camp Wednesday, ending the quarter-century boat people saga in the Chinese territory and leaving more than 100 people homeless. At midnight, security guards marched out of the remote camp at Pillar Point before officials pulled the front gate shut and hung a sign announcing its permanent closure.
NEWS
February 4, 1992 | DAVID HOLLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fighting among refugees in a detention center for Vietnamese boat people in Hong Kong left at least 18 dead and 128 injured Monday night in the worst violence since the camps were set up more than a decade ago, authorities said. The 18 people who died were in a building set on fire during fighting that broke out between rival gangs during festivities marking arrival of the Lunar New Year, according to police in the British colony.
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