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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2000 | Alex Murashko, (714) 966-5974
Little Saigon Radio (KWIZ-AM [1480]) will be celebrating its seventh anniversary of broadcasting at the station on Saturday. The Vietnamese-language station has been on the air since July 1, 1993, and has rallied support for many community causes, including raising money for flood victims in Vietnam. An invitation-only buffet lunch will be served at the station on Brookhurst Street. Information: (714) 918-4444.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2009 | My-Thuan Tran
In a dimly lighted warehouse at the end of an alleyway in Orange County's Little Saigon, five reporters sat side by side on mismatched chairs, talking on telephones and typing away on their keyboards. There was no air conditioning, and two large fans provided little relief from the muggy air. This was the temporary home of Viet Herald Daily News, the newest paper to hit the stands in this ethnic enclave. At a time when most U.S. newspapers are struggling to survive, Vietnamese-language news media here are flourishing.
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BUSINESS
February 22, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two men were strangers in Vietnam. By coincidence, Nguyen Viet and Ho Thanh Viet escaped from Saigon on the day it fell, April 30, 1975. Along with thousands of other South Vietnamese, they fled the Communist takeover aboard U.S. Navy ships. Both men eventually made their way to the United States, where they sought to carve out a new existence in an unfamiliar land by learning to program computers.
BUSINESS
October 22, 2005 | From Associated Press
The San Jose Mercury News, a paper that has won accolades for diversifying its newsroom and trying to improve coverage of minorities, said it would stop printing its Spanish-language newspaper and would sell a Vietnamese publication after failing to make them profitable. Their last editions as Mercury News publications will be Nov. 11, said Mercury News Publisher George Riggs. The Viet Mercury is being sold to a group of businessmen including a former Mercury News staffer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 2009 | My-Thuan Tran
In a dimly lighted warehouse at the end of an alleyway in Orange County's Little Saigon, five reporters sat side by side on mismatched chairs, talking on telephones and typing away on their keyboards. There was no air conditioning, and two large fans provided little relief from the muggy air. This was the temporary home of Viet Herald Daily News, the newest paper to hit the stands in this ethnic enclave. At a time when most U.S. newspapers are struggling to survive, Vietnamese-language news media here are flourishing.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 1993 | DE TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In hopes of catching the ears of some of the 100,000-plus Vietnamese-Americans living in the Southland, Little Saigon Radio Broadcasting today begins a daily nine-hour broadcast of Vietnamese-language programming over KWIZ-FM (96.7). The mix of music and talk programming, the most extensive Vietnamese-language broadcast in Southern California, will air each weekday beginning at 6 a.m.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 1992 | Compiled by Trin Yarborough , For The Times
Counselor, Evans Adult School, Los Angeles; Vietnamese language teacher, UCLA Extension. In my classes, teaching English as a second language, the majority (of the students) came from Latin America and the rest from Asia, Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union, and a few from Africa. The students would get very excited learning about each other's cultures. And they really appreciated it when we talked in class about some customs of this country that seem quite unusual to most of them.
BUSINESS
February 21, 1993 | DEAN TAKAHASHI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The two men were strangers in Vietnam. By coincidence, Nguyen Viet and Ho Thanh Viet both escaped from Saigon on the day it fell, April 30, 1975. Along with thousands of other South Vietnamese, they fled the Communist takeover aboard U.S. Navy ships. Though they filtered through different refugee camps, both men eventually made their way to the United States, where each sought to carve out a new existence in an unfamiliar land by learning to program computers.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1989 | MARIA L. La GANGA, Times Staff Writer
For employees of Nguoi Viet, the major Vietnamese-language newspaper in Orange County, putting out an edition was real drudgery before Victor Nguyen came along. Writing stories wasn't the problem; typesetting was. And the Vietnamese language--with its flurry of accents over nearly every word--was at the heart of the difficulty. Until recently, there was no computer software to handle the complexities of Vietnamese. So Nguoi Viet employees had to type stories into the computer without the accents, print out a master copy of each story and advertisement and fill in the accent marks by hand before the paper went to press.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1993 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With relatively few Orange County colleges offering any instruction in Vietnamese language, everyone from history students to city officials is clamoring for training that officials say is in short supply in a region with the nation's largest Vietnamese population. Only two of the county's 10 community colleges have consistently offered Vietnamese language classes, school officials say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 29, 2002 | VIVIAN LETRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Two Garden Grove high schools will offer foreign-language courses in Vietnamese starting in September, joining the few public schools in the state that teach the language as an elective. Students of Vietnamese heritage make up 32% of the Garden Grove Unified School District's high school enrollment, and more than half the student bodies of its two high schools--Bolsa Chica and La Quinta--where the courses will be offered.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2000 | Alex Murashko, (714) 966-5974
Little Saigon Radio (KWIZ-AM [1480]) will be celebrating its seventh anniversary of broadcasting at the station on Saturday. The Vietnamese-language station has been on the air since July 1, 1993, and has rallied support for many community causes, including raising money for flood victims in Vietnam. An invitation-only buffet lunch will be served at the station on Brookhurst Street. Information: (714) 918-4444.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1999 | TINI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dramatic growth over the last decade in the number of Vietnamese-language radio programs based in Orange County has fundamentally changed the Vietnamese emigre community, observers say. It was radio that brought some 15,000 people into the streets of Westminster for a single rally earlier this year, and the power of the medium--which already reaches across the country--is only likely to increase with use of the Internet and plans for a full-fledged Vietnamese-language radio station in the works.
NEWS
February 11, 1997 | JOSEPH HANANIA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sherry Kanzer, buyer for Kinokuniya Books in downtown Los Angeles, says many of her customers aren't comfortable reading books in English. "The way of expressing yourself in the Japanese language is different. For example, English uses a lot of verbs. In Japanese, the verb is often omitted." But it's not just linguistics that sets her store apart from mainstream English-language bookstores.
NEWS
July 12, 1995 | THAO HUA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eagerly poised in front of a small television in the Nguoi Viet newsroom, Ha Tuong Cat struggled Tuesday to analyze President Clinton's announcement while trying to take it in emotionally. Ha, a staff writer for the nation's largest Vietnamese-language daily newspaper, a man who fought for South Vietnam, reflects the sentiments of his colleagues troubled by plans to restore diplomatic ties with Hanoi. "It is hard," he said, his voice trembling. "We have to try to reflect the community, and here, the community is much more volatile when it comes to this issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1995 | QUYEN DO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Seven-year-old Sandy Nguyen of Westminster says she loves being a Girl Scout. She enjoys camping, going on field trips and learning how to cook. But that's not where her scouting lessons end. "I guess my mom wants me to learn Vietnamese too," Sandy said. What makes her troop--Troop No. 2194--different is that all the girls are Vietnamese Americans. When it's time for a cooking lesson, they learn more than how to fry hamburgers.
NEWS
July 6, 1994 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Though Huong Lam's mother and father almost always communicate with one another in Vietnamese, Huong isn't able to speak much of her parents' native language. "I understand some Vietnamese, but I can't respond in the language. When my parents ask me something in Vietnamese, I answer in English," said the 14-year-old Fountain Valley High School freshman. "I wish I knew Vietnamese, but it's a very difficult language; it's hard to remember because I'm always speaking English."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1993 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dalena's ancestors are Scotch-Irish. Her hair is blond, her eyes blue. She was born in Indiana and grew up in Florida--a long way from Southeast Asia. She didn't utter a word of Vietnamese until three years ago, just before she decided to debut at a nightclub in Anaheim, singing Vietnamese songs with incredible clarity for a Westerner.
NEWS
July 6, 1994 | JULIE BAWDEN DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Though Huong Lam's mother and father almost always communicate with one another in Vietnamese, Huong isn't able to speak much of her parents' native language. "I understand some Vietnamese, but I can't respond in the language. When my parents ask me something in Vietnamese, I answer in English," said the 14-year-old Fountain Valley High School freshman. "I wish I knew Vietnamese, but it's a very difficult language; it's hard to remember because I'm always speaking English."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1993 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With relatively few Orange County colleges offering any instruction in Vietnamese language, everyone from history students to city officials is clamoring for training that officials say is in short supply in a region with the nation's largest Vietnamese population. Only two of the county's 10 community colleges have consistently offered Vietnamese language classes, school officials say.
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