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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1991 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ask Hung Le what's in a name, and the 27-year-old Reseda man will rattle off a listof stunning replies: For the sake of his name, Le escaped alone from his native Vietnam as a child, was shuffled between foster families in the United States, refused to be adopted, got himself classified as an "incorrigible delinquent," graduated from Pepperdine University at the top of his class and married his college sweetheart.
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NEWS
October 27, 1998 | EVELYN LARRUBIA and SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The father of a gang member-turned-state's-evidence was gunned down over the weekend in what investigators say was revenge or intimidation, but the son, Truong Dinh, testified in Van Nuys as scheduled Monday against the notorious Asian Boyz street gang. Dong Dinh, 64, answered the door at his north San Jose home Friday night and was shot to death execution-style by an unknown assailant. Police said there were no witnesses.
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NEWS
October 27, 1998 | EVELYN LARRUBIA and SCOTT GLOVER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The father of a gang member-turned-state's-evidence was gunned down over the weekend in what investigators say was revenge or intimidation, but the son, Truong Dinh, testified in Van Nuys as scheduled Monday against the notorious Asian Boyz street gang. Dong Dinh, 64, answered the door at his north San Jose home Friday night and was shot to death execution-style by an unknown assailant. Police said there were no witnesses.
NEWS
June 26, 1994 | DIANE SEO
Taped to the wall of Ho Hoang's Chinatown apartment is a handwritten Vietnamese proverb that in English means: "On the outside, things look pretty. But on the inside, there's misery." But as Hoang and his 12-year-old twin daughters, Tam and Thien, gather on the floor of their virtually barren apartment, their eyes can't disguise the sadness that comes from years of poverty, misfortune and family separations.
NEWS
December 18, 1989
More than 300 Vietnamese-Americans quietly demonstrated Sunday in front of the British Consulate in Los Angeles, protesting last week's forced repatriation of Vietnamese refugees from the British colony of Hong Kong. Demonstrators received no response from inside the closed consulate offices on Wilshire Boulevard. They held signs, flags from the Republic of Vietnam, which fell to Vietnamese Communists in 1975, and a six-foot version of the Statue of Liberty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES, Times Staff Writer
It was a day of reunions at Los Angeles International Airport for a 21-year-old man who had not seen his mother since he was 14 years old; for a teen-age boy who had never met his little sister; for a college student who last saw his father in 1975 when he was taken away to be "re-educated" in a Southeast Asian prison camp.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1992 | MILES CORWIN
They come by boat, past the Statue of Liberty, these huddled masses, through New York Harbor to Ellis Island, the country's most famous port of entry. This is how the tourists visit the Ellis Island Immigration Museum, one of New York's most popular attractions. Today's immigrants arrive in America on airplanes, and dozens of airports throughout the country are the new Ellis Islands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1991 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ask Hung Le what's in a name, and the 27-year-old Reseda man can offer a stunning reply. For the sake of his name, Le escaped alone from his native Vietnam as a child, was shuffled between foster families in the United States (refusing to be adopted), got himself classified as an "incorrigible delinquent," graduated from Pepperdine University at the top of his class and married his college sweetheart.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1989 | MARK CHALON SMITH
Danh Pham is a tiny man with the slightly sour look of a hard-working businessman who doesn't have time for nosy strangers. Arms crossed, he listens as Tony Lam, restaurateur and man-about-town in Orange County's Little Saigon, asks him to enlighten a reporter about his small video rental business. After much talk in Vietnamese, Pham remains noncommittal, even suspicious, behind the counter of Danh's Video, his shop in a mini-mall off Garden Grove's Bolsa Avenue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1991 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mai Elliott left Vietnam in 1968, fleeing the southerly creep of communist troops through her homeland and the violence that followed them. The horror of war lingers in dreams, of course. But she also sees the war's aftermath in the confused, anxious faces of Vietnamese refugees in the San Fernando Valley.
NEWS
November 19, 1992 | JOHN L. MITCHELL
For many Californians, the riots were more than a momentary blip on the screen--they were a flash point for lasting and fundamental changes in their lives. The devastation left a legacy of broken dreams for many, awakened a sense of social justice in some, unleashed anger and hatred in others, and rekindled a spirit of hope among others.
NEWS
August 17, 1992 | VICTOR MERINA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Thanh Lam lived through war, survived a perilous sea journey to freedom and endured a year's stay in a Malaysian refugee camp before coming to America. And then, 3 1/2 months ago, the 25-year-old man was shot dead, sitting in his pickup truck waiting for a traffic light to change at a corner in Compton. Lam, born in Vietnam of Chinese parents, loved automobiles and basketball. He wore T-shirts, jeans and caps touting such favorite teams as the Georgetown Hoyas and the Lakers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 23, 1992 | MILES CORWIN
They come by boat, past the Statue of Liberty, these huddled masses, through New York Harbor to Ellis Island, the country's most famous port of entry. This is how the tourists visit the Ellis Island Immigration Museum, one of New York's most popular attractions. Today's immigrants arrive in America on airplanes, and dozens of airports throughout the country are the new Ellis Islands.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 1991 | AARON CURTISS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mai Elliott left Vietnam in 1968, fleeing the southerly creep of communist troops through her homeland and the violence that followed them. The horror of war lingers in dreams, of course. But she also sees the war's aftermath in the confused, anxious faces of Vietnamese refugees in the San Fernando Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1991 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ask Hung Le what's in a name, and the 27-year-old Reseda man can offer a stunning reply. For the sake of his name, Le escaped alone from his native Vietnam as a child, was shuffled between foster families in the United States (refusing to be adopted), got himself classified as an "incorrigible delinquent," graduated from Pepperdine University at the top of his class and married his college sweetheart.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 1991 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Ask Hung Le what's in a name, and the 27-year-old Reseda man will rattle off a listof stunning replies: For the sake of his name, Le escaped alone from his native Vietnam as a child, was shuffled between foster families in the United States, refused to be adopted, got himself classified as an "incorrigible delinquent," graduated from Pepperdine University at the top of his class and married his college sweetheart.
NEWS
May 31, 1988 | BORIS YARO and NIESON HIMMEL, Times Staff Writers
Authorities were investigating possible connections between two fires in Los Angeles' Chinatown and two smaller fires in Garden Grove, all set within 24 hours at firms owned by Vietnamese immigrants, arson investigators said Monday. One of the Chinatown fires destroyed a shopping center in the 700 block of North Hill Street. Damage to the building and the six businesses it contained, including a textile firm, was estimated at $450,000. At about the same time, 2 a.m.
NEWS
November 19, 1992 | JOHN L. MITCHELL
For many Californians, the riots were more than a momentary blip on the screen--they were a flash point for lasting and fundamental changes in their lives. The devastation left a legacy of broken dreams for many, awakened a sense of social justice in some, unleashed anger and hatred in others, and rekindled a spirit of hope among others.
NEWS
December 18, 1989
More than 300 Vietnamese-Americans quietly demonstrated Sunday in front of the British Consulate in Los Angeles, protesting last week's forced repatriation of Vietnamese refugees from the British colony of Hong Kong. Demonstrators received no response from inside the closed consulate offices on Wilshire Boulevard. They held signs, flags from the Republic of Vietnam, which fell to Vietnamese Communists in 1975, and a six-foot version of the Statue of Liberty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1989 | CHARISSE JONES, Times Staff Writer
It was a day of reunions at Los Angeles International Airport for a 21-year-old man who had not seen his mother since he was 14 years old; for a teen-age boy who had never met his little sister; for a college student who last saw his father in 1975 when he was taken away to be "re-educated" in a Southeast Asian prison camp.
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