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Vietnamese Officials

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NEWS
May 26, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Efforts by the Bush Administration to link the normalization of relations with Vietnam to progress on a peace settlement in Cambodia have deeply embittered the leadership in Hanoi, with one senior official proclaiming that the relationship has returned to the chilly era of a decade ago. The Vietnamese are so disillusioned with U.S.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2001 | MAI TRAN and MONTE MORIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A Baldwin Park man arrested for allegedly trying to bomb the Vietnamese Embassy in Bangkok earlier this year is one of a small group of Southern Californian exiles working to overthrow Vietnam's Communist government. Vo Van Duc, 41, a former architectural student and construction contractor, was arrested Friday by FBI agents as he stepped off a flight at John Wayne Airport from Seattle.
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NEWS
May 31, 1992 | Reuters
Vietnam's Prime Minister Vo Van Kiet, in a new crackdown on corruption, has told officials they must not exchange gifts with foreign businessmen, the official weekly Saigon Economy said Friday. Foreign business people complain that in order to get things done quickly, they sometimes have to give Vietnamese officials valuable "gifts" or bribes.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 27, 2001
Dr. Nguyen Ton Hoan, 84, for seven months the vice premier of South Vietnam and longtime leader of the Dai Viet, or Greater Vietnam Party of Vietnamese Nationalists opposed to both French and communist rule, died Sept. 19 in Mountain View, Calif. Born in Tay Ninh, South Vietnam, Hoan was trained as a physician at the University of Hanoi but devoted his life primarily to politics. He led a Vietnamese student resistance movement against the French and helped found the Dai Viet in 1939.
NEWS
February 19, 1986 | Associated Press
Members of a congressional delegation just back from Southeast Asia said today they believe that there are Americans living in Vietnam, but they declined to discuss their evidence. "We determined after this visit and lengthy discussions with Vietnamese officials that it is not a question of whether there are live Americans in Vietnam. The question is, Who are they? Why are they there?" Rep. Gerald B. H. Solomon (R-N.Y.) said at a news conference.
NEWS
November 2, 1986
Vietnam plans to return the remains of three U.S. servicemen killed during the Vietnam War sometime in the next several weeks and will investigate 19 new reports of other American remains, a U.S. military official said. Lt. Col. Joe Harvey, head of the Joint Casualty Resolution Center in Hawaii, said on returning from Hanoi after three days of talks that U.S. and Vietnamese officials also discussed the joint excavation of a downed American warplane, but reached no agreement.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 1986 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
Rep. Robert K. Dornan (R-Garden Grove) and a delegation that arrived Friday to seek information about missing Vietnam War soldiers cut short their stay when a high-ranking Vietnamese official abruptly canceled his talks with them. Two hours after the nine-member congressional entourage arrived in Hanoi, Vietnamese officials announced that Foreign Minister Nguyen Co Thach would not be able to keep his scheduled Saturday appointment with the American officials.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 1986 | JOSH GETLIN, Times Staff Writer
Vietnamese officials told Rep. Robert K. Dornan (R-Garden Grove) and a congressional delegation Saturday that some Americans may still be living in remote sections of Vietnam that are not under government control. The Americans also were told that Vietnam soon will hand over the remains of 14 U.S. soldiers who were killed during the war and will provide information on an additional 70 listed as missing in action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 23, 1986 | RAY PEREZ, Times Staff Writer
Rep. Robert K. Dornan (R-Garden Grove) told Vietnamese community leaders Saturday that the Communist government in Hanoi seems to be easing its position on the release of thousands of Vietnamese political prisoners. Dornan, who returned last week from Hanoi as a part of a congressional delegation in search of POWs, had taken with him the names of about 600 Vietnamese who are suspected prisoners who have relatives in Orange County.
NEWS
August 14, 1985 | From Times Wire Services
Vietnam, in its largest accounting of Americans missing in action, today presented crates containing remains of 26 soldiers killed during the Vietnam War to U.S. officials. At the same time, Vietnamese officials reiterated Vietnam's willingness to have the United States establish a permanent MIA liaison office in Hanoi and said they are in favor of high-level talks on the MIA issue.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1998
We were saddened to see that The Times has fallen for the standard government line of Vietnamese cooperation on the POW/MIA issue (Dec. 27, "Issue of MIAs in Vietnam Losing Steam"). The statement about "Vietnam's cooperation, long in coming but now substantial . . . " is totally incorrect. The U.S. government has misinformed the American people regarding archival access as well as the supposed "no notice" live sighting investigations. There are no such things as "no notice" live sighting investigations.
NEWS
February 5, 1995 | GEORGE ESPER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The Vietnam War is long over, and with it the flood of war orphans who were the flotsam and jetsam of that agony. But 20 years after the end of the war, Vietnam still struggles economically and must cope with a new crop of orphans who are a product of its poverty. Here in this suburb of the former Saigon is one haven for them, a tribute to one woman's compassion and hope. The Marina Picasso orphanage, built and supported by the granddaughter of the famous artist Pablo Picasso, is one of the rare symbols of modernization and progress in a country that stood still for half a century, preoccupied by wars with the French, Americans, Chinese and Cambodians.
BUSINESS
January 26, 1994 | CHARLES P. WALLACE
ISSUE: Vietnamese officials are optimistic that oil production will play an increasingly important role in their country's economy, despite disappointing results from early offshore exploration. When Vietnam opened its coastal waters to exploration in the 1980s, 26 major European, Japanese and Australian firms lunged at the chance to hunt for oil in what many consider to be the last part of the world where reserves are likely to exist and exploration has been minimal.
NEWS
May 31, 1992 | Reuters
Vietnam's Prime Minister Vo Van Kiet, in a new crackdown on corruption, has told officials they must not exchange gifts with foreign businessmen, the official weekly Saigon Economy said Friday. Foreign business people complain that in order to get things done quickly, they sometimes have to give Vietnamese officials valuable "gifts" or bribes.
NEWS
January 25, 1992 | Reuters
Vietnam's Foreign Minister Nguyen Manh Cam became the most senior Hanoi official Friday to visit Cambodia since the end to a war that started with a Vietnamese invasion 13 years ago.
NEWS
May 26, 1991 | CHARLES P. WALLACE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Efforts by the Bush Administration to link the normalization of relations with Vietnam to progress on a peace settlement in Cambodia have deeply embittered the leadership in Hanoi, with one senior official proclaiming that the relationship has returned to the chilly era of a decade ago. The Vietnamese are so disillusioned with U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1998
We were saddened to see that The Times has fallen for the standard government line of Vietnamese cooperation on the POW/MIA issue (Dec. 27, "Issue of MIAs in Vietnam Losing Steam"). The statement about "Vietnam's cooperation, long in coming but now substantial . . . " is totally incorrect. The U.S. government has misinformed the American people regarding archival access as well as the supposed "no notice" live sighting investigations. There are no such things as "no notice" live sighting investigations.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 9, 1986
Although Josh Getlin's Feb. 23 article, "Dornan Leaves Hanoi With New Respect for Old Enemy," was well-written and an excellent account of my recent MIA/POW fact-finding mission to Hanoi, I take strong exception to the headline, which implies that I respect the Communist Vietnamese government. As a staunch defender of liberty and justice, I could never respect a nation that enslaves and imprisons its own people--including nuns, priests and Buddhist monks for the nonviolent expression of their beliefs.
NEWS
January 15, 1989 | DAVID HOLLEY, Times Staff Writer
A high-ranking Vietnamese official, reported to be Vice Foreign Minister Dinh Nho Liem, arrived here Saturday on an unannounced mission apparently aimed at ending the Cambodian conflict. China and Vietnam, key backers of the opposing sides in Cambodia, have refused to comment on the arrival of the small Vietnamese delegation. But it appears to be the beginning of the two nations' most serious contact yet in the search for a settlement of the decade-old conflict.
NEWS
November 2, 1986
Vietnam plans to return the remains of three U.S. servicemen killed during the Vietnam War sometime in the next several weeks and will investigate 19 new reports of other American remains, a U.S. military official said. Lt. Col. Joe Harvey, head of the Joint Casualty Resolution Center in Hawaii, said on returning from Hanoi after three days of talks that U.S. and Vietnamese officials also discussed the joint excavation of a downed American warplane, but reached no agreement.
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