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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 1993 | MELANA ZYLA, Melana Zyla is an analyst at the Asian Studies Center of the Heritage Foundation in Washington. and
Thanks to all the tinkering, the Administration's embargo on trade with Vietnam is looking less and less like a hard line and more and more like a sieve. The President would do well to dispose of it completely. It makes a mockery of the political ideals it is supposed to uphold, feeds corruption in Vietnam, needlessly punishes American business and hurts the poor families of Vietnamese refugees more than it hurts the communist regime in Hanoi. On Sept.
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OPINION
January 30, 2013 | Patt Morrison
Almost on impulse, almost 35 years ago, Richard M. Walden and a friend rounded up six tons of relief supplies and a jet to ferry them to Vietnamese boat people in Malaysia. Thus was Operation California - now Operation USA - born. A Times headline soon called him the "charity buccaneer," a red-tape-slashing contrarian who fretted about the "international web of neglect," and who still has sharp words for relief efforts unmet and relief agencies that don't measure up. He has steadfast celebrity supporters, like Julie Andrews, but the advent of social media that let anyone text a few bucks to Lady Gaga's favorite charity in the middle of a concert has made things harder for brick-and-mortar charities like Operation USA. Walden soldiers on, boldly going where too many charity-come-latelies can only try to go. You began in 1979 as Operation California; now it's Operation USA. Our legal name is Operation California.
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MAGAZINE
October 1, 1989
Too many people are trying to reverse the facts of history by pretending that the young men we sent to fight and die in Vietnam were heroes who did something glorious for us. To the contrary, like the Vietnamese people, our soldiers were miserable victims of an insane policy, and their accomplishments came to zero. Although physically and emotionally damaged, Kim Phuc wants to come here and work for reconciliation. That is heroic. EUGENE KUSMIAK, Fallbrook
OPINION
January 26, 2013
Re "Buried history in Hanoi," Opinion, Jan. 20 My wife and I just returned from Hanoi, my first visit since serving as a battalion surgeon in the Marines during the war. We stayed at the Metropole hotel, which Op-Ed article writer Tom Hayden visited recently, but we didn't enter the bomb shelter. Rather, we were impressed by the resilience of the Vietnamese people, who remember the "American war" but nonetheless look forward. The cities we visited were energetic and growing.
NEWS
October 23, 1992 | DAVID HALDANE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
One of President Bush's key Orange County-based Vietnamese-American supporters said Thursday that he would resign from the President's reelection campaign if Bush proceeds with plans to normalize U.S. relations with Vietnam before Inauguration Day. "It would be wrong for us to recognize a country that still oppresses the Vietnamese people," said Ky Ngo, a co-chairman of the Bush/Quayle campaign in Orange County. "I oppose that and I think the majority of Vietnamese (Americans) oppose it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1999
I am a young Vietnamese American. I grew up in Vietnam and was educated in the United States. I would like to thank all Americans who support the Vietnamese American community. Some Americans may forget or do not know why more than 2 million Vietnamese people and 58,000 American soldiers died during the Vietnam War, but we don't. Our parents fought and we are still fighting for freedom in Vietnam. We are not protesting against the owner of the video store [in Westminster], but we are protesting against the Socialist Republic of Vietnam.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1991 | LYNN SMITH and THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The church is red brick, pastel-paned Middle America. The music is a drum-and-guitar version of the "Battle Hymn of the Republic." The religion is hand-clapping, tears-of-joy Pentecostal. It is a typical evangelical revival meeting--except here all the Bibles, the sermons and the faces are Vietnamese.
NEWS
August 16, 1993 | Here are portions of the address Pope John Paul II gave Sunday to representatives of Vietnamese Catholics during his visit to Denver
Dear Vietnamese Friends, My visit to Denver for the World Youth Day gives me this opportunity to meet you, members of the Vietnamese community of the United States, and to reaffirm my pastoral solicitude and affection for the whole Vietnamese people. I greet each one of you. I greet the community in exile, and I send a special word of esteem and friendship to your brothers and sisters in your homeland, where many are listening to my voice through a radio link-up.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1994
John McAlister in his introduction to "Vo Nguyen Giap" (Opinion, Jan. 9) and his interview created many false perceptions, among them that lifting the U.S. embargo against Vietnam would be a "cure-all" solution for all Vietnamese economic ills and that Vietnamese communists have always wanted to be on our side. First, the sorry state of the Vietnam economy was a direct result of Vietnamese economic and political policies, not from the U.S. embargo, as he asserted. After the war ended in 1975, victorious communist Northern Vietnamese imposed a Soviet-style economy on the South, centralizing all decisions, collectivizing all agricultural and industrial productions, and destroying all forms of private ownership.
OPINION
January 26, 2013
Re "Buried history in Hanoi," Opinion, Jan. 20 My wife and I just returned from Hanoi, my first visit since serving as a battalion surgeon in the Marines during the war. We stayed at the Metropole hotel, which Op-Ed article writer Tom Hayden visited recently, but we didn't enter the bomb shelter. Rather, we were impressed by the resilience of the Vietnamese people, who remember the "American war" but nonetheless look forward. The cities we visited were energetic and growing.
TRAVEL
September 20, 2009
Thanks to Karin Esterhammer for sharing her family's life in Vietnam ["One Family's Plan B: Sweet Home Vietnam," Sept. 13]. I admire her and her spouse for their adventuresome spirit and for raising a child who, at 8 years old, is willing to try their adventure. I savored every tidbit about their daily life in Ho Chi Minh City. The best part was their interactions with their neighbors and vendors. I hope you will publish a follow-up story. This was the best article I've ever read in the Travel section, and I've subscribed to the L.A. Times for more than 30 years.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 2005
Tim RUTTEN asks whether "the U.S. media are somehow falling short on this story [of the Iraq war]" ["Pulitzers Cast a Blind Eye on Iraq," April 9]. Can there be any doubt? Do you remember Vietnam? Surely there is no comparison. The grisly photographs, the daily tally of body counts -- ours and theirs -- presented as "kill ratios," the intense coverage of public protests against the war. During the Vietnam era, whether for good or for bad (take your pick), it was unequivocally the media, through its close scrutiny and critical exposure of the government's conduct of the war and its effects on both U.S. service personnel and their families and the Vietnamese people, that produced the negative reaction on the part of the American people that finally and belatedly spurred our government to bring that sad chapter of American history to its end. The reporting on the war in Iraq could not be more different.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 3, 2001 | MAI TRAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For Nhu-Ngoc Ong, an aspiring social scientist, the trip back to Vietnam was the first step toward achieving her goal of becoming an expert on the issues of her native land. The 24-year-old UC Irvine graduate student, who emigrated from Vietnam to California a decade ago, spent a month in Hanoi, the nation's capital, training researchers for a groundbreaking public survey of political and social attitudes.
NEWS
April 28, 2000 | MATTHEW EBNET, Times Staff Writer
His self-portrait is a black-and-white photograph, two images of him merging somewhere near the middle with blur and darkness. His facial features are unrecognizable. It is a sad image of a man adrift among two cultures and homes and languages, and one that Ryan Pham figures will define the rest of his life.
NEWS
April 15, 2000 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
He is the last of Vietnam's revolutionary heroes, a white-haired man of 87, barely 5-foot-3, who long ago was removed from the corridors of power and now passes his days talking about past victories and the achievements of communism. But Gen. Vo Nguyen Giap--the architect of Vietnam's military victories over France and the United States--has lost neither his drawing power nor his celebrity status.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2000 | QUYEN DO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
About 1,000 people jammed a Buena Park auditorium Sunday to commemorate 53 days of protest rallies against the government of Vietnam, which were sparked one year ago by a Westminster video store owner's display of the Communist country's flag.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1994 | TINA NGUYEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Squinting into the bright sun, Huy Thi Vu hid tears as shereceived Communion at a special outdoor Mass on Sunday at Santa Ana Stadium to honor 117 Vietnamese Catholic martyrs. Along with Vu, more than 5,000 Vietnamese Roman Catholics gathered as part of an annual celebration of the martyrs, slain in their homeland from the 16th to 19th centuries. All were proclaimed saints in 1988 by Pope John Paul II in the largest group canonization in church history.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 1995 | JOHN POPE, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
After spending decades in Communist prison camps in Vietnam, Nguyen Chi Thien escaped in 1979 and scaled the wall of the British Embassy in Hanoi to deliver his life's work, a collection of more than 400 poems. The title: "Flowers From Hell." He was captured and again imprisoned, but the work won him international recognition and was translated into eight languages.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 2, 1999
I am a young Vietnamese American. I grew up in Vietnam and was educated in the United States. I would like to thank all Americans who support the Vietnamese American community. Some Americans may forget or do not know why more than 2 million Vietnamese people and 58,000 American soldiers died during the Vietnam War, but we don't. Our parents fought and we are still fighting for freedom in Vietnam. We are not protesting against the owner of the video store [in Westminster], but we are protesting against the Socialist Republic of Vietnam.
NEWS
August 18, 1996 | BINH HA HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They came from around the world to pursue a goal that may not even be accomplished in the next decade: pushing for democracy and economic development in Vietnam. About 350 people from 11 countries gathered at the third triennial Vietnamese Professional Society conference Saturday to discuss how to press for democratic reforms while the Communist government vows to maintain political control.
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