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Vietnamese Population

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2003 | William Lobdell, Times Staff Writer
A 62-year-old priest born in Vietnam and schooled in the United States was appointed auxiliary bishop of Orange on Friday, placing the nation's first Vietnamese American Roman Catholic bishop at the center of the country's largest Vietnamese population. The appointment of Dominic Dinh Mai Luong by Pope John Paul II reflects the rapid, one-generation maturation of the Vietnamese American community within the Catholic Church since the end of the Vietnam War in 1975.
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NEWS
December 1, 2005 | Leslee Komaiko
Pho 97 Some pho aficionados consider the various incarnations served at this Chinatown eatery (formerly known as Pho 79) the best in L.A. In addition to pho dac biet, a beef lover's delight, there is good cha gio: crisp, golden spring rolls that you tuck into cool lettuce leaves. * Pho dac biet, $5.41; cha gio, $6.44. 727 N. Broadway, Suite 120, downtown L.A.; (213) 625-7026.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1993 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With relatively few Orange County colleges offering any instruction in Vietnamese language, everyone from history students to city officials is clamoring for training that officials say is in short supply in a region with the nation's largest Vietnamese population. Only two of the county's 10 community colleges have consistently offered Vietnamese language classes, school officials say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2003 | William Lobdell, Times Staff Writer
A 62-year-old priest born in Vietnam and schooled in the United States was appointed auxiliary bishop of Orange on Friday, placing the nation's first Vietnamese American Roman Catholic bishop at the center of the country's largest Vietnamese population. The appointment of Dominic Dinh Mai Luong by Pope John Paul II reflects the rapid, one-generation maturation of the Vietnamese American community within the Catholic Church since the end of the Vietnam War in 1975.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1994 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Americans finally came to grips with that profound, self-inflicted wound called the Vietnam War. It was a nasty, immoral mess, but we can now stand before Maya Lin's Vietnam Veterans Memorial, know our soldiers fought bravely, weep and try to heal ourselves. An exhibition at Cal State Fullerton reminds us that another legacy of that conflict took the form of tens of thousands of Vietnamese immigrants who, utterly displaced, came here hoping to piece together decent lives.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2000 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly a decade, Dr. Co Pham has advocated reconciliation and free trade between the United States and Vietnam, engendering such fierce protests in Orange County's Little Saigon community that he hired armed guards to protect his medical clinic. Now, as the two nations edge closer to a sweeping trade accord nearly 25 years after the Vietnam War's end, the native of Hanoi has stepped up his controversial campaign.
NEWS
May 26, 2002 | VIVIAN LETRAN and SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bach Van Nguyen, 92, has reconciled himself to his loneliness. His wife is dead and the mistress who once came between them is gone. He doesn't get along with his adult children in Florida and rarely speaks to them. His most constant companion is a plastic yellow bird, bought for $8, that chirps at the sound of his voice in a nearly empty Garden Grove studio apartment. "The bird likes to talk to me," Nguyen says gleefully.
NEWS
February 28, 1992 | PATRICK MOTT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The building in the city that once crumbled under a rain of artillery is clean, trim and inviting, not unlike a resort hotel, and the young Vietnamese people who live there are much the same. But they are not quite Vietnamese, and they don't want to stay. They long to be American, but they are not quite American. They are hopeful, but they are also bewildered, dispossessed, lost in a world of hazy culture and ethnicity between Orient and Occident.
NEWS
December 1, 2005 | Leslee Komaiko
Pho 97 Some pho aficionados consider the various incarnations served at this Chinatown eatery (formerly known as Pho 79) the best in L.A. In addition to pho dac biet, a beef lover's delight, there is good cha gio: crisp, golden spring rolls that you tuck into cool lettuce leaves. * Pho dac biet, $5.41; cha gio, $6.44. 727 N. Broadway, Suite 120, downtown L.A.; (213) 625-7026.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1997 | PATRICE APODACA and DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The possibility of Vietnam becoming a full trading partner with the United States comes as good news to Southern California, particularly Orange County, home of the largest concentration of Vietnamese immigrants in the world. Businesses owned by Vietnamese Americans will be among the first to benefit, observers say, because of their ties to the homeland. Other local companies stand to gain as well, including engineering and construction services providers, such as Irvine-based Fluor Corp.
NEWS
May 26, 2002 | VIVIAN LETRAN and SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Bach Van Nguyen, 92, has reconciled himself to his loneliness. His wife is dead and the mistress who once came between them is gone. He doesn't get along with his adult children in Florida and rarely speaks to them. His most constant companion is a plastic yellow bird, bought for $8, that chirps at the sound of his voice in a nearly empty Garden Grove studio apartment. "The bird likes to talk to me," Nguyen says gleefully.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2000 | MARC BALLON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly a decade, Dr. Co Pham has advocated reconciliation and free trade between the United States and Vietnam, engendering such fierce protests in Orange County's Little Saigon community that he hired armed guards to protect his medical clinic. Now, as the two nations edge closer to a sweeping trade accord nearly 25 years after the Vietnam War's end, the native of Hanoi has stepped up his controversial campaign.
BUSINESS
December 18, 1997 | PATRICE APODACA and DARYL STRICKLAND, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The possibility of Vietnam becoming a full trading partner with the United States comes as good news to Southern California, particularly Orange County, home of the largest concentration of Vietnamese immigrants in the world. Businesses owned by Vietnamese Americans will be among the first to benefit, observers say, because of their ties to the homeland. Other local companies stand to gain as well, including engineering and construction services providers, such as Irvine-based Fluor Corp.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 6, 1994 | WILLIAM WILSON, TIMES ART CRITIC
Americans finally came to grips with that profound, self-inflicted wound called the Vietnam War. It was a nasty, immoral mess, but we can now stand before Maya Lin's Vietnam Veterans Memorial, know our soldiers fought bravely, weep and try to heal ourselves. An exhibition at Cal State Fullerton reminds us that another legacy of that conflict took the form of tens of thousands of Vietnamese immigrants who, utterly displaced, came here hoping to piece together decent lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 28, 1993 | THUAN LE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With relatively few Orange County colleges offering any instruction in Vietnamese language, everyone from history students to city officials is clamoring for training that officials say is in short supply in a region with the nation's largest Vietnamese population. Only two of the county's 10 community colleges have consistently offered Vietnamese language classes, school officials say.
NEWS
February 28, 1992 | PATRICK MOTT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The building in the city that once crumbled under a rain of artillery is clean, trim and inviting, not unlike a resort hotel, and the young Vietnamese people who live there are much the same. But they are not quite Vietnamese, and they don't want to stay. They long to be American, but they are not quite American. They are hopeful, but they are also bewildered, dispossessed, lost in a world of hazy culture and ethnicity between Orient and Occident.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1994
Re: the leader of the Vietnamese community in Southern California: It's so outrageous and ridiculous that someone with only 1.5% of the total Vietnamese population in Southern California could claim to be the leader of the Vietnamese community in Southern California. If those people couldn't play a democratic game in the election, please do not try to play a clown game. H. THEM Garden Grove
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