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April 18, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
Averting a "critical situation," leaders in Orange County's Vietnamese community accepted an apology from Westminster City Councilman Frank Fry Jr. today and ended a recall effort against him. Chuyen V. Nguyen, a spokesman for a Vietnamese ad hoc committee, said at a news conference that members of Orange County's Vietnamese community regretted remarks branded as "insensitive" that Fry made to a group of South Vietnamese military veterans....
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NEWS
June 13, 1994 | DOREEN CARVAJAL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Along the sunbaked macadam parking strips of Little Saigon, a candidate is stalking handshakes. Chung Nguyen's hands are poised and his suit is pressed to the crisp corners of political correctness. His campaign manner is the proper blend of sincerity and enthusiasm, an attitude that endures even when a few Vietnamese American voters warily regard his extended hand like some limp fish at the market. "They don't know what to do at first, because Asian leaders don't usually campaign that way," explained Nguyen, a 37-year-old computer programmer and a resident of Orange.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1992 | THUAN LE
In homes and in temples, Vietnamese residents gathered Tuesday to wish each other Chuc Mung Nam Moi-- Happy New Year. In Westminster, home to one of the county's largest concentrations of exiled Vietnamese, among the places residents came together to usher in Tet, the Lunar New Year, was the A Di Da Temple, where they prayed to deities and ancestors to grant them a happy new year. Through a variety of ceremonies, the celebrants ushered in the Year of the Monkey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1992 | ROSE KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two violent, gang-related crimes that occurred back to back last week, community leaders met Wednesday to try to mobilize Vietnamese residents. The 2-week-old Vietnamese Gang Prevention Committee is urging residents to give police any information they have about gang members and gang-related activities, and is advising parents who suspect their children of gang involvement to bring them into counseling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1990
So most Americans are upset by the continuing arrival of immigrants. But the immigrants don't come because they want to. Why would people want to leave the nation where they were born and grew up, where they know the language and customs, where friends and relatives are nearby, to come to the United States that is notorious for its racism and bigotry, tolerance of economic and social exploitation, where they must learn a difficult language and adopt...
NEWS
June 13, 1994 | DOREEN CARVAJAL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Along the sunbaked macadam parking strips of Little Saigon, a candidate is stalking handshakes. Chung Nguyen's hands are poised and his suit is pressed to the crisp corners of political correctness. His campaign manner is the proper blend of sincerity and enthusiasm, an attitude that endures even when a few Vietnamese American voters warily regard his extended hand like some limp fish at the market. "They don't know what to do at first, because Asian leaders don't usually campaign that way," explained Nguyen, a 37-year-old computer programmer and a resident of Orange.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
Years of cultural bridge-building collapsed earlier this month when Westminster City Councilman Frank Fry Jr. insulted the city's growing Vietnamese community by advising a group wishing to parade in honor of its war dead, "If you want to be South Vietnamese, go back to South Vietnam." Vietnamese residents who fled here after the war now make up 15% of the city's population of 75,000 and are destined to play a vital role in developing its economic future. The Little Saigon district of colorful Asian-style shopping malls has more than 700 businesses, many owned by Vietnamese, and city officials dream of the day it will become a tourist magnet similar to Los Angeles' Chinatown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
Years of cultural bridge-building collapsed earlier this month when Westminster City Councilman Frank Fry Jr. insulted the city's growing Vietnamese community by advising a group wishing to parade in honor of its war dead, "If you want to be South Vietnamese, go back to South Vietnam." Vietnamese residents who fled here after the war now make up 15% of the city's population of 75,000 and are destined to play a vital role in developing its economic future. The Little Saigon district of colorful, Asian-style shopping malls has more than 700 businesses, many owned by Vietnamese, and city officials dream of the day it will become a tourist magnet similar to Los Angeles' Chinatown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1992 | ROSE KIM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After two violent, gang-related crimes that occurred back to back last week, community leaders met Wednesday to try to mobilize Vietnamese residents. The 2-week-old Vietnamese Gang Prevention Committee is urging residents to give police any information they have about gang members and gang-related activities, and is advising parents who suspect their children of gang involvement to bring them into counseling.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 1992 | THUAN LE
In homes and in temples, Vietnamese residents gathered Tuesday to wish each other Chuc Mung Nam Moi-- Happy New Year. In Westminster, home to one of the county's largest concentrations of exiled Vietnamese, among the places residents came together to usher in Tet, the Lunar New Year, was the A Di Da Temple, where they prayed to deities and ancestors to grant them a happy new year. Through a variety of ceremonies, the celebrants ushered in the Year of the Monkey.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 9, 1990
So most Americans are upset by the continuing arrival of immigrants. But the immigrants don't come because they want to. Why would people want to leave the nation where they were born and grew up, where they know the language and customs, where friends and relatives are nearby, to come to the United States that is notorious for its racism and bigotry, tolerance of economic and social exploitation, where they must learn a difficult language and adopt...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
Years of cultural bridge-building collapsed earlier this month when Westminster City Councilman Frank Fry Jr. insulted the city's growing Vietnamese community by advising a group wishing to parade in honor of its war dead, "If you want to be South Vietnamese, go back to South Vietnam." Vietnamese residents who fled here after the war now make up 15% of the city's population of 75,000 and are destined to play a vital role in developing its economic future. The Little Saigon district of colorful Asian-style shopping malls has more than 700 businesses, many owned by Vietnamese, and city officials dream of the day it will become a tourist magnet similar to Los Angeles' Chinatown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 30, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
Years of cultural bridge-building collapsed earlier this month when Westminster City Councilman Frank Fry Jr. insulted the city's growing Vietnamese community by advising a group wishing to parade in honor of its war dead, "If you want to be South Vietnamese, go back to South Vietnam." Vietnamese residents who fled here after the war now make up 15% of the city's population of 75,000 and are destined to play a vital role in developing its economic future. The Little Saigon district of colorful, Asian-style shopping malls has more than 700 businesses, many owned by Vietnamese, and city officials dream of the day it will become a tourist magnet similar to Los Angeles' Chinatown.
NEWS
April 18, 1989 | DAVID REYES, Times Staff Writer
Averting a "critical situation," leaders in Orange County's Vietnamese community accepted an apology from Westminster City Councilman Frank Fry Jr. today and ended a recall effort against him. Chuyen V. Nguyen, a spokesman for a Vietnamese ad hoc committee, said at a news conference that members of Orange County's Vietnamese community regretted remarks branded as "insensitive" that Fry made to a group of South Vietnamese military veterans....
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 1988
Last week the Vietnamese community celebrated Tet, the beginning of the lunar new year. While not a religious holiday, the three-day observance began for many of Orange County's 90,000 Vietnamese residents with visits to churches, temples and pagodas to honor the dead, reflect on the past and pray for the future. The holiday, steeped in 4,000 years of tradition, transcends the religious boundaries of Buddhists, Confucianists, Catholics and Protestants.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1986
In an attempt to build trust, Garden Grove police officers are staging a crime-prevention fair Saturday for the city's Vietnamese residents. The fair's purpose is to alleviate fear of the police on the part of many Vietnamese, Community Service Officer Thiem Cao said. "Police back home (in Vietnam) are completely different from police here," said Cao, a five-year veteran of Garden Grove's police force. In Vietnam, when police knock on the front door, "it means trouble," Cao said.
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