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December 6, 1998 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They don't call him Vietnam's James Bond for nothing. Six years ago, Vietnamese refugee Ly Tong literally leaped to fame over Ho Chi Minh City's skies. Flying from Bangkok to Vietnam, he amiably summoned a flight attendant as they neared the former Saigon. Then he slung a rope around her neck, declared he had a bomb (a bluff) and forced the pilot to fly low above the city. Flinging 50,000 leaflets ahead of him, Tong wriggled through the cockpit window and parachuted into Vietnam.
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NEWS
December 6, 1998 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They don't call him Vietnam's James Bond for nothing. Six years ago, Vietnamese refugee Ly Tong literally leaped to fame over Ho Chi Minh City's skies. Flying from Bangkok to Vietnam, he amiably summoned a flight attendant as they neared the former Saigon. Then he slung a rope around her neck, declared he had a bomb (a bluff) and forced the pilot to fly low above the city. Flinging 50,000 leaflets ahead of him, Tong wriggled through the cockpit window and parachuted into Vietnam.
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NEWS
December 6, 1998 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They don't call him Vietnam's James Bond for nothing. Six years ago, Vietnamese refugee Ly Tong literally leaped to fame over Ho Chi Minh City's skies. Flying from Bangkok to Vietnam, he amiably summoned a flight attendant as they neared the former Saigon. Then he slung a rope around her neck, declared he had a bomb (a bluff) and forced the pilot to fly low above the city. Flinging 50,000 leaflets ahead of him, Tong wriggled through the cockpit window and parachuted into Vietnam.
NEWS
December 6, 1998 | CLAUDIA KOLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
They don't call him Vietnam's James Bond for nothing. Six years ago, Vietnamese refugee Ly Tong literally leaped to fame over Ho Chi Minh City's skies. Flying from Bangkok to Vietnam, he amiably summoned a flight attendant as they neared the former Saigon. Then he slung a rope around her neck, declared he had a bomb (a bluff) and forced the pilot to fly low above the city. Flinging 50,000 leaflets ahead of him, Tong wriggled through the cockpit window and parachuted into Vietnam.
BOOKS
April 1, 1990 | Don T. Phan, Phan, a Vietnamese immigrant, is a businessman and a free-lance writer. and
"Hearts of Sorrow" is an oral history of the travails of Vietnamese emigres in America, told through the words of 14 refugees. The author, an anthropology professor at San Jose State University, includes as subjects many residents of Santa Clara County, where one of the largest Vietnamese communities in the United States is located. Obviously a sympathetic observer, he devotes much of the opening chapters to debunking common "misconceptions" about refugees, such as alleged high welfare dependency, special treatment on the part of government authorities and extensive gang activities.
BUSINESS
September 23, 1996 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Occidental Chemical Shuns Vietnam Venture: The unit of Los Angeles-based Occidental Petroleum Corp. has pulled out of a $109-million polyvinyl chloride resin venture in southern Vietnam, the Vietnam Investment Review said. The state-controlled weekly said Occidental Chemical Corp. walked away from the venture with Marubeni Corp. and two local firms because the authorities had licensed a rival project. The venture, Oxy-Vina Plastics & Chemical Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 24, 2002 | From Times Staff Reports
An Orange County legislator who represents the largest community of Vietnamese outside Vietnam was stopped from visiting that country 10 hours before his trip. State Sen. Joe Dunn, D-Garden Grove, was planning a weeklong trip to Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City with his brother, Michael, and an aide, Chuyen Nguyen, to learn more about his constituents' culture, values, history and lifestyles. The Vietnamese government revoked his and Nguyen's visas Thursday, declining to explain.
NEWS
September 24, 1987 | Associated Press
A U.S. military team will go to Hanoi today to receive the remains of three people who Vietnam says were Americans killed in the Vietnam War, the U.S. Embassy said Wednesday. The visit follows recent visits to Hanoi by American officials trying to break a deadlock on resolving the fates of 1,776 Americans listed as missing in Vietnam. Embassy spokesman Ross Petzing said the 14-member group will fly to Hanoi aboard a U.S.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 10, 2004 | From Associated Press
A homosexual killer is leading police on a harrowing journey into an underworld they never knew existed. It's up to officer Lan to solve the case before another victim is found, but he must first confront his own prejudices against a gay brother he refuses to accept. It sounds like a hot new Hollywood teaser -- only it's in Vietnamese. Vietnam's favorite TV show, "The Crime Police," opens its new season this month by tackling a taboo topic and offering a lesson about tolerance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 10, 1985 | G. M. BUSH
Jack Shockley, a member of the Westminster police force since 1959 and the police chief since 1980, will retire April 26. Shockley, 50, said he and his wife, Darlene, plan to travel around the United States for much of the rest of the year. He said he had planned to work at least until 1987, but an illness changed his plans. He said that being able to "go through the ranks and to have the opportunity to work all the various divisions of the department" has been gratifying.
BOOKS
April 1, 1990 | Don T. Phan, Phan, a Vietnamese immigrant, is a businessman and a free-lance writer. and
"Hearts of Sorrow" is an oral history of the travails of Vietnamese emigres in America, told through the words of 14 refugees. The author, an anthropology professor at San Jose State University, includes as subjects many residents of Santa Clara County, where one of the largest Vietnamese communities in the United States is located. Obviously a sympathetic observer, he devotes much of the opening chapters to debunking common "misconceptions" about refugees, such as alleged high welfare dependency, special treatment on the part of government authorities and extensive gang activities.
NEWS
November 24, 1989 | From United Press International
Cambodian resistance commander Prince Norodom Ranariddh has broadcast offers of rewards to defectors from the Communist Cambodian government ranging up to $40,000 in gold for anyone fleeing with a Soviet-built MIG jet fighter. Ranariddh, commander of the forces loyal to his father, Prince Norodom Sihanouk, said in the Wednesday night broadcast that the safety of defectors would be assured.
NEWS
October 23, 1988 | United Press International
The Khmer Rouge guerrilla group announced Saturday that it is prepared to accept an international peacekeeping force as part of an agreement to end the nine-year-old Cambodian conflict. The move eliminates a major difference between the Khmer Rouge and resistance coalition partners Prince Norodom Sihanouk and Son Sann, who have said a peacekeeping force would ensure that the Khmer Rouge does not use its military superiority to retake power in Cambodia in the event of a Vietnamese withdrawal.
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