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Vietnamese Women

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NEWS
April 7, 2000
Three generations of Vietnamese women lost their world to war but rebuilt their fortunes in California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2009 | Patricia Sullivan, Sullivan writes for the Washington Post.
Frederick Gulden, an architect dubbed "the last American in Vietnam" when stranded in the country for 15 months after the U.S. military withdrew, died of complications from esophageal cancer April 4 at George Washington University Hospital. He was 86 and lived in Alexandria, Va. Gulden had established a Saigon office for the architectural firm DeLeuw Cather International in 1972, after two years with the U.S. Agency for International Development.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 1, 2009 | Patricia Sullivan, Sullivan writes for the Washington Post.
Frederick Gulden, an architect dubbed "the last American in Vietnam" when stranded in the country for 15 months after the U.S. military withdrew, died of complications from esophageal cancer April 4 at George Washington University Hospital. He was 86 and lived in Alexandria, Va. Gulden had established a Saigon office for the architectural firm DeLeuw Cather International in 1972, after two years with the U.S. Agency for International Development.
BOOKS
September 22, 2002 | JAMES E. CACCAVO, James E. Caccavo is a writer, photographer and former editor who worked in Vietnam from 1968 to 1970 for the Red Cross and Newsweek magazine. He is a trustee on the Indochina Media Memorial Foundation and a contributor to the Requiem book and exhibit project.
War is an equal opportunity abuser. It wounds or kills whomever it wants, whenever it wants, regardless of age or gender. But for women wanting to cover the war in Vietnam, the news media in the 1960s were not equal opportunity employers. Women covering the war were confronted with more than one adversary. Besides the North Vietnamese Army and the Viet Cong, women had to deal with discouraging attitudes from their employers and American military brass.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 7, 1990 | SONNI EFRON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The beleaguered production of "Miss Saigon" has come under new attack, this time from Vietnamese-Americans who charge that the hit London musical stereotypes and demeans the Vietnamese. "Again and again, Hollywood and the theatrical world have exploited the Vietnam War, and here we go again," said Chi-Muoi Lo, a Los Angeles actor and playwright who is organizing Vietnamese community protests against the play.
NEWS
January 16, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
The bodies of 11 young Vietnamese women, brutally murdered at sea, washed ashore in southern Thailand, Thai police said today. The bodies, some naked and others only in pants, were strung together with nylon rope. The rope, twisted round the necks of some of the women, suggested they were dragged behind a boat before being cut loose into the sea, police said. "We know they were Vietnamese because we found Vietnamese currency," a police officer in Nakorn Si Thammarat province said.
NEWS
May 20, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six weeks into his new life in America, Nguyen Be Lory is doing the things you would expect a 4-year-old to do. He's discovered Teletubbies and developed a taste for Fruit Loops. At preschool, he makes friends easily and ranks recess as his favorite activity. But nothing in this small boy's short life has been typical. What his classmates don't know is that any day now, the new kid will become one of Vietnam's wealthiest citizens, when the first $7.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1990
Two men and a juvenile have been arrested as suspects in the robbery of two Vietnamese women at their Linda Vista home, San Diego police said Thursday. Trug Van Nguyen, 36, and Phul Diam Hai, 20, were arrested late Wednesday at their residence in the 3700 block of 52nd Street, police spokesman Bill Robinson said. A 17-year-old juvenile was also arrested at a house in the 4200 block of 54th Street.
BOOKS
September 22, 2002 | JAMES E. CACCAVO, James E. Caccavo is a writer, photographer and former editor who worked in Vietnam from 1968 to 1970 for the Red Cross and Newsweek magazine. He is a trustee on the Indochina Media Memorial Foundation and a contributor to the Requiem book and exhibit project.
War is an equal opportunity abuser. It wounds or kills whomever it wants, whenever it wants, regardless of age or gender. But for women wanting to cover the war in Vietnam, the news media in the 1960s were not equal opportunity employers. Women covering the war were confronted with more than one adversary. Besides the North Vietnamese Army and the Viet Cong, women had to deal with discouraging attitudes from their employers and American military brass.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 12, 2000 | CATHY PASCUAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lack of knowledge about the Pap smear and cultural myths about cancer are costing Vietnamese American women their lives, experts say. Vietnamese Americans have the highest cervical cancer rate (43 cases per 100,000) of all ethnic groups. The number is 5.7 times that of non-Latino whites and 7 1/2 times that of Japanese Americans, who have the lowest rate (5.8 cases per 100,000), according to the National Cancer Institute.
NEWS
April 7, 2000
Three generations of Vietnamese women lost their world to war but rebuilt their fortunes in California.
NEWS
May 20, 1999 | MARY CURTIUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Six weeks into his new life in America, Nguyen Be Lory is doing the things you would expect a 4-year-old to do. He's discovered Teletubbies and developed a taste for Fruit Loops. At preschool, he makes friends easily and ranks recess as his favorite activity. But nothing in this small boy's short life has been typical. What his classmates don't know is that any day now, the new kid will become one of Vietnam's wealthiest citizens, when the first $7.
NEWS
September 30, 1997 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dinner was deliberately light fare--acorn squash soup and lamb, with dessert of green-apple sorbet and berries. Guests described the evening as cozy and autographed each other's calligraphic menus as souvenirs. But conversation at the opening session of this powerful new group with members from four continents centered on weighty world problems, from human rights to environmental dangers.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 23, 1995 | Kevin Thomas, Kevin Thomas is a Times staff writer
When "From Hollywood to Hanoi" was named Best of the Fest at Telluride in September, 1993, its maker, Tiana, began drumming up publicity for it in hopes of landing a distributor. The film, widely praised and honored at festivals, is a poignant and revealing documentary about the Vietnamese American actress's visit to the country she had left as a child more than 20 years earlier. "From Hollywood to Hanoi" is filled with moments that drive home the terrible toll of war.
NEWS
February 11, 1990 | SUZETTE PARMLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
At first glance, the billboard in San Francisco's downtown featuring a young, denim-clad Vietnamese man with a cigarette dangling from his mouth may look like just another smoking ad aiming to entice. But a double take at the brand name of the cigarette pack the model holds shows the universal symbol of death: a skull and crossbones. And in Vietnamese, the billboard reads: "You wouldn't want your friend to get cancer--so why offer him a cigarette?"
ENTERTAINMENT
March 29, 1985 | SUZANNE MUCHNIC
"Along the Street of Knives," a collaborative installation of photographs and sculpture by Hanh Thi Pham and Richard Turner, approaches a painful topic with artistic grace and emotional horror. Their work is handsomely designed and elegantly finished, but its heart is mired in the cultural devastation of the Vietnam era. Hanh Thi Pham, a Vietnamese refugee, settled in Southern California in 1975 and has established herself as a photographer of provocative tableaux based on her experiences.
NEWS
June 4, 1991 | Reuters
More than 100 women from a northern rural province in Vietnam were sold into slavery and sent across the border to China during the first five months of this year, an official newspaper said Monday. "There has been a rise in Hai Hung of the crime of luring women to the border, then selling them to foreigners," the weekly Dai Doan Ket (Great Solidarity) reported. It said that 52 people, including some state employees, are under investigation for possible involvement in the slave trade.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1990
Two men and a juvenile have been arrested as suspects in the robbery of two Vietnamese women at their Linda Vista home, San Diego police said Thursday. Trug Van Nguyen, 36, and Phul Diam Hai, 20, were arrested late Wednesday at their residence in the 3700 block of 52nd Street, police spokesman Bill Robinson said. A 17-year-old juvenile was also arrested at a house in the 4200 block of 54th Street.
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