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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1991
Your article on Port Hueneme proposing to charge a view tax is not new (July 2). In Bath, England, this tax was imposed a couple of hundred years ago. To this day there are still houses with windows boarded up. In those day they called it "daylight robbery." It would be the same today. JAY A. ARCHER Glendale
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BUSINESS
August 5, 2012 | Michael Hiltzik
Promoters of ideological campaigns just love college professors. That may sound implausible, but it's not so hard to understand: Attaching a professor's name to your cause confers instant credibility and projects objectivity, there are lots of professors around, and their professional work may be so technical and abstruse that no one will know if they really do support your position. As a result, it's a rare campaign that won't at one point or another publish a list of faculty members, jangling with PhDs, backing it up. One wonders if that explains the strange relationship between the right-wing multimillionaire Joe Ricketts and Selahattin and Ayse Imrohoroglu, a Turkish-born husband-and-wife team of economists at the University of Southern California.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 27, 1991
As residents of Port Hueneme, we are only two of many who think the City Council should seriously reconsider the so-called "View Tax." Port Hueneme is not a community of wealthy people. It is made up, for the most part, of retirees living on Social Security, the poor and the middle class--who all struggle to make ends meet. Surely there are other avenues open that could be used to raise funds if a few bright people could sit down and take the time to do some creative financial planning?
BUSINESS
December 20, 2007 | Karen E. Klein, Special to The Times
Dear Karen: I'm interested in buying a portrait studio in Texas. I went there, talked with the broker and the owner and looked over the facilities. I liked what I saw, but when I asked to see tax returns for the business the broker told me I could get access to them only after we agreed on a purchase price. Is this right? Answer: Business owners are understandably reluctant to give their tax returns to just anyone.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1998
It all depends on your point of view. To Port Hueneme City Manager Dick Velthoen and his City Council bosses, levying a special assessment on residents with ocean vistas back in 1991 looked like a dandy way to add a few bucks to the city's threadbare purse. To the residents targeted by the proposed assessment, it looked like they were being singled out to pay maintenance bills for a beach the whole world was welcome to use.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1991
The Port Hueneme City Council now holds the new title as laughing stock champ of the country, for the enactment of its now famous view tax. The former holder was the Oxnard City Council when in 1989 it permitted beachfront building heights to be taller than those on the inland lots. Lest the Oxnard City Council entertain the idea of recapturing the title by also enacting a view tax, let it first repay those inland lot owners (upwards of $50,000 each) for taking their views away when it voted to allow the mini-skyscrapers now being built on the beach.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 1992
An RV park on the beach or a view tax? Those are the options offered to the citizens of Port Hueneme to bring in $400,000 of additional revenue for the city. Neither option has received a positive response. The Ventura County Taxpayers Assn. suggests one more option: abolish the city's Police Department and contract with the county Sheriff's Department for police services. At the very least the city and the county should conduct a study to determine the annual savings, currently estimated at $300,000 to $400,000, then allow the citizens to make their choice.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 6, 1991
The city of Port Hueneme has declared war on its citizens. Examples include the imposition of the view tax; two-hour parking signs on West Surfside Drive and South Ventura Road, accompanied by discriminatory enforcement (thinly veiled "revenue enhancement" policies); erection of a single sign on the west end of Hueneme Beach banning dogs on the beach, leashed or otherwise (Where are the notices on the rest of the beach?); harassment of the local "undesirables" (in other words, surfers)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1998
Re "State Court Refuses to Hear 'View Tax' Case," Feb. 6. Three cheers for Dorothy Blake, who valiantly fought and won against City Hall. Those of us who live at the beach owe her a tremendous debt of gratitude. This issue is but another one of City Manager Dick Velthoen's legacies to the citizens of Port Hueneme. Mr. Velthoen should be held accountable for the millions of our tax dollars that he has so carelessly wasted. His "brilliant" ideas have turned our city's finances into nightmares.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1997 | NICK GREEN
There's no end in sight for the drawn-out legal battle over Port Hueneme's nationally notorious "view tax." The City Council voted 3 to 2 Wednesday to seek a review by the California Supreme Court of an appeal court decision that ordered the city to pay more than $1 million to 1,252 oceanfront homeowners and their attorneys.
NEWS
February 17, 2002
Re "Irvine to Ask Landowners to OK Higher Tax," Feb. 9: I see Irvine is going to ask for a tax hike to keep parks and streets looking good. That doesn't make sense. How can Irvine's City Council find millions of dollars each year in an effort to kill the county's El Toro airport plans and not have enough money to do the things a City Council ought to do? My guess is the probability of two-thirds of Irvine's voters approving any tax hike hovers somewhere between slim and none. It seems to me the better way to get Irvine out of its financial bind is to reject Measure W on the March 5 ballot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 26, 1998
It all depends on your point of view. To Port Hueneme City Manager Dick Velthoen and his City Council bosses, levying a special assessment on residents with ocean vistas back in 1991 looked like a dandy way to add a few bucks to the city's threadbare purse. To the residents targeted by the proposed assessment, it looked like they were being singled out to pay maintenance bills for a beach the whole world was welcome to use.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1998 | NICK GREEN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
From the window of her beachfront condominium, 77-year-old widow Dorothy Blake savors the anticipation of a breaking wave. She enjoys glorious winter sunsets. And watches cargo ships steam in and out of nearby Port of Hueneme. "I live here because I love living at the edge of the sea," she said. Blake figures she pays for the privilege of that view via property taxes and the $100,000 purchase price she paid in 1980 for her modest, 1,000-square-foot condominium.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1998
Re "State Court Refuses to Hear 'View Tax' Case," Feb. 6. Three cheers for Dorothy Blake, who valiantly fought and won against City Hall. Those of us who live at the beach owe her a tremendous debt of gratitude. This issue is but another one of City Manager Dick Velthoen's legacies to the citizens of Port Hueneme. Mr. Velthoen should be held accountable for the millions of our tax dollars that he has so carelessly wasted. His "brilliant" ideas have turned our city's finances into nightmares.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1998 | NICK GREEN
The city of Port Hueneme will soon be about $1 million poorer and 1,252 residents and their attorneys a little richer after the state Supreme Court declined to review the "view tax" court case. Both sides had expected the California Supreme Court would refuse to hear the last-ditch appeal by the city of what lower courts have called an "illegal tax."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 13, 1997
Re "GOP Lawmakers Are Counting on Making Taxes Pay in 1998 Agenda," Dec. 1: Although Ronald Brownstein does not directly quote me as saying "not only does the public cherish many of the deductions it would sweep away," its placement would suggest this is something I conveyed in my interview with him. I did not. Instead, I said the home mortgage deduction should be protected. Even more critically, the article quotes me as saying, "Americans remain very comfortable with the notion of progressivity."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 26, 1991
To offset beach maintenance costs, Port Hueneme recently imposed a special assessment of $66 to $184 a year on beach-area homeowners, based on their view of and proximity to the ocean. The assessment is unprecedented in California. Should property owners pay an extra tax for beach upkeep based on their proximity to the shore? Jerry Sanford, Ventura County assessor I have a very large concern with that.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 21, 1997 | NICK GREEN
There's no end in sight for the drawn-out legal battle over Port Hueneme's nationally notorious "view tax." The City Council voted 3 to 2 Wednesday to seek a review by the California Supreme Court of an appeal court decision that ordered the city to pay more than $1 million to 1,252 oceanfront homeowners and their attorneys.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 5, 1997 | TRACY WILSON
After slapping Port Hueneme property owners with what amounts to an illegal tax, the city must now pay more than $1 million in reimbursement costs and attorneys' fees, a panel of three appellate judges decided Tuesday. The state Court of Appeal upheld a lower court decision to invalidate Port Hueneme's so-called view tax on the grounds that it unfairly targeted 1,252 oceanfront landowners. The city's lawyer said an appeal is likely.
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