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Viggo Mortensen

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ENTERTAINMENT
August 17, 1997 | Steve Hochman
As the Navy SEAL adversary of trainee Demi Moore in "G.I. Jane," Viggo Mortensen continues his steady rise in Hollywood, with a role opposite Diane Lane in the Dustin Hoffman-produced indie "The Blousemaker" coming next. But the New York native, 38, remains committed to the L.A. underground as a poet and spoken-word performer, working alongside such notables as his ex, ex-X singer Exene Cervenkova. TREND WATCH: "Last two summers it's been aliens. I suppose if 'G.I.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK - Mark Wahlberg and Denzel Washington were at a corner table celebrating the start of production on their western action-comedy "2 Guns" last year when they spotted an odd sight. On the dance floor, sweatily busting moves while surrounded by a gaggle of women, was their director: the rugged, bearded Icelander Baltasar Kormakur. "Denzel looked at me and said, 'What's up with your boy?'" Wahlberg recalled as he sipped bottled water at a midtown restaurant last week, trotting out a not-bad Washington impersonation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
December 21, 2002 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
The cutest guy in Middle-earth has an urge to smoke. Mumbling something about going to his car, Viggo Mortensen, the dashing human hero of the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy, heads out of Chez Jay, Hollywood's favorite dive in spitting distance of the ocean. The Santa Monica place is pretty skeevy as Sunday brunch spots go, which is of course part of its charm. That may be especially true for Mortensen, who finds the industry's sleeker trappings as skeevy as some Bel-Air-ians would find Chez Jay.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Robert Abele
In the Argentine thriller "Everybody Has a Plan," the lure of a new life with old trappings draws restless Buenos Aires doctor Agustin (a Spanish-speaking Viggo Mortensen) into the dingy, threat-laced world of his delta-dwelling twin brother Pedro. But the noir-ish contours of writer-director Ana Piterbarg's story yield a frustratingly dissipated movie, one with few storytelling pleasures and an overabundance of forced mood. Mortensen, a reliably brooding actor who always seems to distrust dialogue as a way to reveal character, is appropriately cast in the dual role of a citified creature willing to engineer an identity shift to exorcise a crushing melancholy, as well as a backwoods denizen comfortable in his own isolated, occasionally criminal existence.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2007 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
AS Viggo Mortensen and director David Cronenberg plotted the unforgettable bathhouse knife fight in their new crime thriller, "Eastern Promises," Cronenberg told the actor he wanted realism and "body-ness." The director wanted to challenge his audience to really experience the intimacy of such violence. "Well, it's obvious," Mortensen told him, "I have to play this naked." Boy does he.
NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By Michael Ordoña, Special to the Times
Some of this season's award contending films are the fruit of deep-rooted creative partnerships. Here, we look at three such pairings: the longtime alliance of director Martin Scorsese and editor Thelma Schoonmaker, frequent collaborators David Cronenberg and Viggo Mortensen, and the budding brotherhood of Oren Moverman and Woody Harrelson. "Hugo" Scorsese and Schoonmaker have worked together on all the director's features since 1980, including "Hugo," which melds the stories of a young orphan living in a Paris train station in the 1930s and the early days of filmmaking.
NEWS
April 3, 1994 | Kenneth Turan
Sean Penn's 1991 writing and directing debut is a psychodrama so intensely personal that it is difficult to read or even experience as anything more than a not-quite-veiled commentary on his own life. Based loosely on Bruce Springsteen's brooding song "Highway Patrolman," it is a Vietnam-era parable of two Midwestern brothers--the local sheriff (David Morse, left) and the local hell-raiser (Viggo Mortensen)--dealing in their own ways with the collapse of their family.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Robert Abele
In the Argentine thriller "Everybody Has a Plan," the lure of a new life with old trappings draws restless Buenos Aires doctor Agustin (a Spanish-speaking Viggo Mortensen) into the dingy, threat-laced world of his delta-dwelling twin brother Pedro. But the noir-ish contours of writer-director Ana Piterbarg's story yield a frustratingly dissipated movie, one with few storytelling pleasures and an overabundance of forced mood. Mortensen, a reliably brooding actor who always seems to distrust dialogue as a way to reveal character, is appropriately cast in the dual role of a citified creature willing to engineer an identity shift to exorcise a crushing melancholy, as well as a backwoods denizen comfortable in his own isolated, occasionally criminal existence.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2005 | Susan King
Ashton Holmes left the East Coast for Los Angeles about two years ago -- and within months had landed a role in "A History of Violence," which opened Friday. Holmes, 23, plays Jack Stall, the teenage son of a small-town couple (Viggo Mortensen, Maria Bello) whose life changes when his father becomes a national hero by fighting off a pair of drifters who show up in his diner, looking for trouble.
NEWS
January 3, 2012 | By Michael Ordoña, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"A Dangerous Method," the intellectually stimulating look at the formative days of psychoanalysis, presents Viggo Mortensen in a transformative performance as Sigmund Freud, Michael Fassbender as his restrained protégé and rival, Carl Jung, and a bold Keira Knightley as the patient-turned-practitioner who came between them. But it was almost a Julia Roberts movie. "I first heard of and was intrigued by the story of Sabina Spielrein in a book by Aldo Carotenuto, 'A Secret Symmetry,'" says screenwriter Christopher Hampton of the character played by Knightley.
NEWS
December 15, 2011 | By Michael Ordoña, Special to the Times
Some of this season's award contending films are the fruit of deep-rooted creative partnerships. Here, we look at three such pairings: the longtime alliance of director Martin Scorsese and editor Thelma Schoonmaker, frequent collaborators David Cronenberg and Viggo Mortensen, and the budding brotherhood of Oren Moverman and Woody Harrelson. "Hugo" Scorsese and Schoonmaker have worked together on all the director's features since 1980, including "Hugo," which melds the stories of a young orphan living in a Paris train station in the 1930s and the early days of filmmaking.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 23, 2011 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
Before it became known as psychoanalysis, the radical new method of dealing with emotional crises pioneered by Sigmund Freud, Carl Jung and others was known simply as "the talking cure. " And it is talk - smart, satisfying and sometimes even thrilling - that is at the heart of "A Dangerous Method. " "Method" stars Viggo Mortensen as Freud, Michael Fassbender as Jung, and a game but somewhat miscast Keira Knightley as Sabina Spielrein, a woman who influenced them both. The confident directing style of David Cronenberg is essential in making this kind of intellectually stimulating cinema look easy, but the critical component in the film's success is Christopher Hampton's classically well-written script.
NEWS
November 18, 2009 | Sam Adams
John Hillcoat needed a face. To carry the lead in "The Road," his adaptation of Cormac McCarthy's post-apocalyptic novel about a father and son roaming the charred remains of what was once America, would require an actor capable of sustaining an intimate two-hander in which the bulk of his scenes would be played opposite a young boy. The lead actor would also need the drawing power to support the movie's $25-million budget. But it was the face that concerned him most. "I was really looking for the everyman from the book," Hillcoat recalled before the movie's premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September.
NEWS
November 18, 2009
With more than 30 films to his credit, starting with a small role as an Amish farmer in Harrison Ford's "Witness," Viggo Mortensen has only recently begun catching the eye of the award groups. In addition to ensemble wins and nominations for the three films in the "Lord of the Rings" series, the actor caught the industry's attention in a big way for his work in 2007's "Eastern Promises." Academy Award 2008: Nominated for lead actor, "Eastern Promises" BAFTA Award 2008: Nominated for lead actor, "Eastern Promises" British Independent Film Award 2007: Won best actor for "Eastern Promises" Golden Globes 2008: Nominated for best performance by an actor in a motion picture drama for "Eastern Promises" Screen Actors Guild Award 2008: Nominated for outstanding male actor in a lead role, "Eastern Promises"
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 2007 | Gina Piccalo, Times Staff Writer
AS Viggo Mortensen and director David Cronenberg plotted the unforgettable bathhouse knife fight in their new crime thriller, "Eastern Promises," Cronenberg told the actor he wanted realism and "body-ness." The director wanted to challenge his audience to really experience the intimacy of such violence. "Well, it's obvious," Mortensen told him, "I have to play this naked." Boy does he.
NEWS
November 18, 2009 | Sam Adams
John Hillcoat needed a face. To carry the lead in "The Road," his adaptation of Cormac McCarthy's post-apocalyptic novel about a father and son roaming the charred remains of what was once America, would require an actor capable of sustaining an intimate two-hander in which the bulk of his scenes would be played opposite a young boy. The lead actor would also need the drawing power to support the movie's $25-million budget. But it was the face that concerned him most. "I was really looking for the everyman from the book," Hillcoat recalled before the movie's premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival in September.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 2013 | By Steven Zeitchik
NEW YORK - Mark Wahlberg and Denzel Washington were at a corner table celebrating the start of production on their western action-comedy "2 Guns" last year when they spotted an odd sight. On the dance floor, sweatily busting moves while surrounded by a gaggle of women, was their director: the rugged, bearded Icelander Baltasar Kormakur. "Denzel looked at me and said, 'What's up with your boy?'" Wahlberg recalled as he sipped bottled water at a midtown restaurant last week, trotting out a not-bad Washington impersonation.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 2005 | Susan King
Ashton Holmes left the East Coast for Los Angeles about two years ago -- and within months had landed a role in "A History of Violence," which opened Friday. Holmes, 23, plays Jack Stall, the teenage son of a small-town couple (Viggo Mortensen, Maria Bello) whose life changes when his father becomes a national hero by fighting off a pair of drifters who show up in his diner, looking for trouble.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 5, 2004 | Kenneth Turan, Times Staff Writer
"Perhaps you have never heard of the great horse race of the Bedouin, held annually for a thousand years," says the arrogant factotum Aziz, oozing disdain. "It is known as" (pause for effect) "the Ocean of Fire." Given that the year is 1890, it's likely that Frank Hopkins, the Western cowboy being spoken to, has never heard of the Bedouin, let alone this daunting 3,000-mile, 68-day endurance test across the trackless wastes of Arabia.
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