Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsVigilante
IN THE NEWS

Vigilante

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 23, 1997
Phil Carpenter's letter (July 16) about vigilantism and Megan's Law is as shortsighted and poorly thought out as the law itself. Carpenter believes that the only people who have to fear Megan's Law are the criminals themselves. This is simply not true. What if a vigilante decided to burn the home of a registered sex offender? What if neighboring homes caught on fire? What if the neighbors in those homes burned to death? It is easy to see how this law could have a negative effect on many more people than the registered sex offender.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
April 15, 2014 | By Tracy Wilkinson and Cecilia Sanchez
MEXICO CITY - The Mexican government has set a date for the so-called self-defense militias in the troubled western state of Michoacan to dissolve and account for their weapons, a move that does not necessarily signal the end of the vigilante movement. Alfredo Castillo, the administration's point-man for Michoacan state, said in a series of interviews Tuesday that the militias had agreed to disband by May 10. Those who want to continue patrolling the towns of Michoacan will have to become part of a new statewide rural police force, Castillo said.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1989
There are two implications to be gleaned from a recent Times story on relations between developers and Los Angeles' increasingly assertive neighborhood associations. One is merely unlovely; the other is instructive. Nowadays, when developers confront local opponents to one of their projects, they can expect to be asked for more than modifications to the building itself.
WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Richard Fausset and Cecilia Sanchez
MEXICO CITY - A key leader of the vigilante “self-defense” movement in Mexico's Michoacan state said Monday that he was refusing a government order to disarm, and roadblocks to keep out federal forces charged with taking away the vigilantes' weapons were reported in numerous cities. Vigilante leader Jose Manuel Mireles said in a radio interview that the government had not sufficiently pacified the state. “Armed and masked” drug cartel members began appearing in the streets just hours after the government's announcement last week declaring it was time for the vigilantes to disarm, he said.
WORLD
April 7, 2014 | By Richard Fausset and Cecilia Sanchez
MEXICO CITY - A key leader of the vigilante “self-defense” movement in Mexico's Michoacan state said Monday that he was refusing a government order to disarm, and roadblocks to keep out federal forces charged with taking away the vigilantes' weapons were reported in numerous cities. Vigilante leader Jose Manuel Mireles said in a radio interview that the government had not sufficiently pacified the state. “Armed and masked” drug cartel members began appearing in the streets just hours after the government's announcement last week declaring it was time for the vigilantes to disarm, he said.
WORLD
April 11, 2013 | By Richard Fausset and Cecilia Sanchez, Los Angeles Times
MEXICO CITY - Debate is intensifying over armed vigilante patrols that have sprung up in crime-plagued sections of rural Mexico, particularly in the state of Guerrero, where some patrols joined forces this week with a radical teachers union that has been wreaking havoc with massive protests, vandalism and violent confrontations with police. The two groups, on the surface, would appear to have little in common. The vigilante patrols, typically made up of masked campesinos , are among dozens that have emerged in the countryside in recent months, purporting to protect their communities from the depredations of the drug cartels.
NATIONAL
January 25, 2011 | By Nicholas Riccardi, Los Angeles Times
As her mother tells it, 9-year-old Brisenia Flores had begged the border vigilantes who had just broken into her house, "Please don't shoot me. " But they did ? in the face at point-blank range, prosecutors allege, as Brisenia's father sat dead on the couch and her mother lay on the floor, pretending that she too had been killed in the gunfire. FOR THE RECORD: Border vigilante: A story in Wednesday's Section A on the trial of a border vigilante in Arizona accused of killing a 9-year-old girl and her father misidentified a defense attorney in the case.
NEWS
March 15, 1987 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Florentina Roble, a neighborhood official in this war-torn city 600 miles south of Manila, dropped by the office of the city's military commander last week to volunteer her services in the struggle against the nation's Communist insurgency. Roble had never fired a gun in her life, she said. But the soft-spoken, middle-age woman told the commander that she would do her best to organize a civilian vigilante squad to keep the Communists out of her neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 3, 2010
Liberal guilt won out over a British hitman amid films in limited release this weekend. Director Nicole Holofcener's well-reviewed drama "Please Give," starring Catherine Keener, opened to an estimated $128,696 at three theaters in New York City and two in Los Angeles this weekend, giving it a healthy per-location average of $25,739. "Harry Brown," which stars Michael Caine as a reluctant aging vigilante, debuted to a decent but less impressive $180,957 at 19 theaters in Los Angeles, New York, Chicago and San Francisco.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2009 | Dennis Lim
If the revenge thriller seems like an especially inflexible genre, it might be because its founding formula is basically a biblical credo: an eye for an eye. In film after film, a vigilante hero is wronged and because of the failures of the legal system must take matters into his -- or, in some cases, her -- own hands. There is no real suspense over the outcome -- payback is exacted, in due course -- but the nominal pleasures of most of these movies lie precisely in their familiarity, in their brazen appeal to our most basic instincts.
WORLD
March 12, 2014
MEXICO CITY - One of the best-known leaders of Mexico's vigilante “self-defense” movement has been arrested on suspicion of participating in a double homicide, raising new doubts about the federal government's strategy of partnering with armed campesino groups in the fight against a powerful drug cartel in Michoacan state. Hipolito Mora Chavez, a lime grower who gained fame for leading one of the first local uprisings of autodefensa groups early last year in the small city of La Ruana, was arrested Tuesday evening by state officials.
WORLD
February 22, 2014 | By Mery Mogollon and Chris Kraul
CARACAS, Venezuela - Opponents and supporters of President Nicolas Maduro held massive demonstrations Saturday in central Caracas and other Venezuelan cities as the unofficial death toll rose to 11 in more than a week of unrest. Leading the opposition demonstration in eastern Caracas was Liliana Tintori, wife of Leopoldo Lopez, the former Caracas borough mayor who was arrested this week and charged with inciting violence that has erupted during protests. Lopez and other opposition leaders say armed pro-government vigilantes have been responsible for the deaths and that the opposition has demonstrated peacefully to protest rising crime and shortages.
WORLD
February 16, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
CHILPANCINGO, Mexico - On a cool evening in February, Pioquinto Damian, the head of the Chamber of Commerce here in Guerrero's capital city, was locked away in his downtown apartment, afraid to step outside. He was convinced that the mayor had tried to kill him in an ambush just a few days before. In response, the governor had assigned him 18 heavily armed police officers as bodyguards. A few miles outside town, hundreds of members of autodefensas - vigilante "self-defense" militias composed largely of fed-up farmworkers - were patrolling the streets of semirural suburbs with ancient rifles and shotguns, hoping to rid them of the drug cartel thugs who had terrorized them for years.
WORLD
February 8, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY -- The vigilante "self-defense" groups in Mexico's Michoacan state on Saturday entered Apatzingan, the stronghold of the Knights  Templar drug cartel, carrying no weapons but escorted by troops and federal police. The vigilantes have long considered Apatzingan, a city of more than 90,000, to be a prime target in their fight against the cartel, which has wormed its way deep into the fabric of Michoacan society. The vigilantes' threat to take the city by force last month prompted the federal government to send thousands of troops into the southwestern state to avoid a bloody showdown.
WORLD
February 6, 2014 | By Cecilia Sanchez and Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - Four human heads were reportedly discovered Thursday in Michoacan state, one of several recent incidents that suggest the Knights Templar drug cartel may be lashing out as the federal government and vigilante groups attempt to retake territory under cartel control. The heads were found in the indigenous community of Zacan, about 200 miles west of Mexico City, according to numerous news reports. The newspaper El Universal reported that a "message with threats from organized crime" was found along with the body parts.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 30, 2014 | By Robert Abele
The only real response to a thuddingly unfunny vigilante satire like "May I Kill U" is, "Well, I hope that filmmaker got something out of his system. " Writer-director Stuart Urban's movie introduces us to bicycle cop Baz (Kevin Bishop), who doesn't have the best response to getting hit on the head by looters during 2011 riots in London: He quickly decides to start murdering transgressors, filming his deeds with his helmet-cam, then uploading the footage so he can become a death-wish social media darling.
WORLD
February 16, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
CHILPANCINGO, Mexico - On a cool evening in February, Pioquinto Damian, the head of the Chamber of Commerce here in Guerrero's capital city, was locked away in his downtown apartment, afraid to step outside. He was convinced that the mayor had tried to kill him in an ambush just a few days before. In response, the governor had assigned him 18 heavily armed police officers as bodyguards. A few miles outside town, hundreds of members of autodefensas - vigilante "self-defense" militias composed largely of fed-up farmworkers - were patrolling the streets of semirural suburbs with ancient rifles and shotguns, hoping to rid them of the drug cartel thugs who had terrorized them for years.
WORLD
January 30, 2014 | By Richard Fausset and Cecilia Sanchez
MEXICO CITY -- Mexico's attorney general said Thursday that he has proof that some of the arms being used by the vigilante “self-defense” groups of Michoacan state were supplied by a drug cartel, the Jalisco New Generation, according to news reports. The self-defense groups sprang up last February to take on a drug cartel called the Knights Templar. Many members are rural landowners and farmworkers fed up with the harassment and extortion by the Knights Templars. But there has been wide speculation that the groups had some connection to, or support from, the New Generation, a rival of the Knights Templar.
WORLD
January 25, 2014 | By Richard Fausset
MEXICO CITY - Boots on the ground was the easy part. Last week, Mexican President Enrique Peña Nieto sent a massive surge of military and federal police to embattled Michoacan state. The federal forces currently patrolling its cities, highways and backroads have brought a tenuous peace to a region that had faced a potential showdown between the dominant Knights Templar drug cartel and armed vigilante militias that emerged to drive the cartel off. Now Peña Nieto must find a long-term solution for the troubled area known as Tierra Caliente, or Hot Land, where years of corruption and neglect - and the subsequent tyranny imposed by criminals - have eroded faith in government authority at all levels, allowing civil society to all but unravel.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|